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5 Crazy Ways Social Media Is Changing Your Brain Right Now

5 Crazy Ways Social Media Is Changing Your Brain Right Now

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Is Facebook Making Us Lonely? - Stephen Marche Yvette Vickers, a former Playboy playmate and B-movie star, best known for her role in Attack of the 50 Foot Woman, would have been 83 last August, but nobody knows exactly how old she was when she died. According to the Los Angeles coroner’s report, she lay dead for the better part of a year before a neighbor and fellow actress, a woman named Susan Savage, noticed cobwebs and yellowing letters in her mailbox, reached through a broken window to unlock the door, and pushed her way through the piles of junk mail and mounds of clothing that barricaded the house. Upstairs, she found Vickers’s body, mummified, near a heater that was still running. Her computer was on too, its glow permeating the empty space. The Los Angeles Times posted a story headlined “Mummified Body of Former Playboy Playmate Yvette Vickers Found in Her Benedict Canyon Home,” which quickly went viral.

Our Facebook walls boost self-esteem, study finds "Mirror, mirror on the wall/Who in the land is fairest of all?" But unlike Snow White's Queen, many people don't feel better after gazing at their wall mirror. Facebook walls, on the other hand, can have a positive influence on the self-esteem of college students, report social media researchers at Cornell. This is probably because Facebook allows them to put their best face forward, says Jeffrey Hancock, associate professor of communication; users can choose what they reveal about themselves and filter anything that might reflect badly. Feedback from friends posted publicly on people's profiles also tend to be overwhelmingly positive, which can further boost self-esteem, said Hancock, who co-authored a paper published Feb. 24 in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking.

Facebook Addiction' Activates Same Brain Areas As Drugs; How Social Media Sites Hook You In The 2014 social media update from the Pew Research Center showed Facebook continues to be the most popular of the social media sites. Though platform growth has slowed, the level of user engagement has increased, researchers said. Seventy percent of Facebook users engage with the site daily while 45 percent do so several times a day — a 63 percent increase from 2013. More importantly, Facebook has significant overlap with other platforms. Fifty-two percent of online adults use two or more social media sites, another significant increase from 2013. But, are these increased numbers a sign of enjoyment or addiction?

One size does not fit all, CPD in a modern school Published on April 27th, 2015 | by Mark Anderson One of great things about teaching is that each year the page resets itself. Children come back from their summer holidays that little bit different. A little taller, new experiences, maybe with a tan, a little more street-wise, complaining their wrists hurt because their writing practice has fallen by the wayside over the last few weeks. 8 Shocking Suicide Attempts Posted on The Internet The Chinese woman who appears to have posted her suicide on Instagram A young woman in China may have posted her final moments of life on Instagram. The unnamed woman, whose account is jojostai1012, uploaded a series of pictures that were directed toward her ex-boyfriend. One of the messages, when translated, reads, “I will haunt you day and night after I'm dead."

“Tip-of-the-Tongue Syndrome,” Transactive Memory, and How the Internet Is Making Us Smarter by Maria Popova “A public library keeps no intentional secrets about its mechanisms; a search engine keeps many.” “The dangerous time when mechanical voices, radios, telephones, take the place of human intimacies, and the concept of being in touch with millions brings a greater and greater poverty in intimacy and human vision,” Anaïs Nin wrote in her diary in 1946, decades before the internet as we know it even existed. Her fear has since been echoed again and again with every incremental advance in technology, often with simplistic arguments about the attrition of attention in the age of digital distraction. But in Smarter Than You Think: How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better (public library), Clive Thompson — one of the finest technology writers I know, with regular bylines for Wired and The New York Times — makes a powerful and rigorously thought out counterpoint. He writes in the introduction:

Digital Literacy: Professional Development Resource This resource is designed to support primary and secondary teachers to integrate the development of students’ digital literacy into everyday learning. The activities cover the following areas: Developing practitioners’ understanding of digital literacy and its relevance to their own contexts.Planning activities that can be integrated into everyday teaching to support students to develop both subject knowledge and digital literacy.Practical ideas for the classroom, including explorations of free web-based tools and activities. The materials, developed with primary and secondary school teachers as part of Futurelab’s digital participation project, can be downloaded from our website.

'Sharenting' trends: Do parents share too much about kids on social media? Some of social media's greatest stars aren't even old enough to tweet: Pictures of kids playing dress up, having meltdowns and even in the bathtub adorn Facebook walls. Diaper-donning toddlers dancing to the likes of Beyonce and Taylor Swift rack up YouTube views. Countless blogs share stories about everything from potty training to preschool struggles. Today's University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health finds that this so-called "sharenting" isn't going anywhere anytime soon, with more than half of mothers and one-third of fathers discussing child health and parenting on social media and nearly three quarters of parents saying social media makes them feel less alone.

Resources for Teaching Digital Literacy Search Tools Search is the essential 21st century skill. Developing search literacy in students should be the priority of our education. Teachers and students need the ability, search tools and strategies to effectively mine for information, evaluate and validate information. FindingEducation, it’s for teachers to find best education resources on the web , backed by FindingDulcinea’s hand-selected and professionally edited education resource library. Job applications: social media profiles under scrutiny The Chartered Institute of Professional Development (CIPD) has produced a guide to what constitutes good practice for employers conducting pre-employment checks on job applicants. While it goes beyond simple online research into a candidate's background, it does look into how far employers should actually go in using social media checks in support of the recruitment process. It is a growing issue: recent research conducted by the CIPD showed that two out of five employers look at job applicants' online activity or profiles on sites such as Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn at the recruitment stage. In a recent separate survey by Acas, 45% of those involved in hiring staff said they were already using social media tools in recruitment, including screening candidates by viewing their profiles, and around 40% said they would make greater use of them in the future. The CIPD's guide addresses this and other issues that recruiters need to consider.

Five Hidden Dangers of Facebook A Facebook login page is seen on a computer screen in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Thursday, August 27, 2009. Facebook is agreeing to give users more control over their information in response to concerns raised by Canadian privacy officials. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Adrian Wyld) AP Photo/Adrian Wyld Facebook claims it has 400 million users. But are they well-protected from prying eyes, scammers and unwanted marketers?

Sonia Livingstone: Digital Media and Children’s Rights The following post was adapted from a lecture given by Sonia Livingstone at the Palais des Nations, Geneva, on 12 September 2014, at a United Nations Day of General Discussion of the Committee on the Rights of the Child. Fast-developing ICTs are reshaping children’s lives for better and for worse – already in high-income countries, fast expanding in middle-income countries, and increasingly also in low-income countries. More and more children, families and communities rely on technologies as part of the taken-for-granted infrastructure of everyday life. Almost every aspect of children’s lives has an online dimension, whether through their direct engagement with ICT or through the institutional management of contents or services that affect the conditions of children’s lives. Indeed, it is becoming hard to draw the line between offline and online. ITU figures show that some 3 in 4 households the global North have internet access, compared with less than 1 in 4 in the global South.

Capital - Can social media get you fired? Increasingly, as personal and professional lives become more enmeshed, even talented professionals run the risk of getting fired or not getting a new position because of what they post on social networks. One in 10 job seekers between the ages of 16 and 34 have been rejected for a job because of something posted on their profiles. Laws in different countries are still evolving in terms of what employers can and cannot do with what they find via social media sites. But it is not uncommon for both candidates and employees, especially in the United States, to be asked to hand over their personal passwords so supervisors or human resources can access their profiles.

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Don't Miss These Google Resources and Lesson Plans for Teaching Digital Citizenship September 25 , 2014Google Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum is a great resource from Google to help teachers educate their students on the importance of digital citizenship and the different ways and strategies to use to keep themselves safe while using the net. This work is a fruit of a partnership between Google security team and experts from iKeepsafe and it provides some interesting lesson plans that teachers can use in their classrooms. The purpose of these lessons are to : Enable students to think critically Properly evaluate online sourcesHelp students understand how to protect themselves from online threats ( e.g bullies and scammers).think before they shareBe good digital citizens.

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