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HyperGrammar

HyperGrammar
Welcome to HyperGrammar electronic grammar course at the University of Ottawa's Writing Centre. This course covers approximately the same ground as our English department's ENG 1320 Grammar course. The content of HyperGrammar is the result of the collaborative work of the four instructors who were teaching the course in Fall 1993: Heather MacFadyen, David Megginson, Frances Peck, and Dorothy Turner. David Megginson was then responsible for editing the grammar and exercises and for converting them to SGML. This package is designed to allow users a great deal of freedom and creativity as they read about grammar. HyperGrammar allows users to create and follow their own lines of thought. This package is currently under construction! Please read the Copyright and Terms of Use before you begin using HyperGrammar, and note that we provide NO WARRANTY of the accuracy or fitness for use of the information in this package. * This site uses the Oxford dictionary spelling.

http://arts.uottawa.ca/writingcentre/en/hypergrammar

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Exercises at Grammar Bytes! Terms of Use You may not alter, sell, or post these materials on a different server. Photocopying for students or linking to materials here does not require my permission. General Writing If you are having trouble locating a specific resource please visit the search page or the Site Map. The Writing Process These OWL resources will help you with the writing process: pre-writing (invention), developing research questions and outlines, composing thesis statements, and proofreading. While the writing process may be different for each person and for each particular assignment, the resources contained in this section follow the general work flow of pre-writing, organizing, and revising. For resources and examples on specific types of writing assignments, please go to our Common Writing Assignments area. Academic Writing

Conciseness Summary: This resource will help you write clearly by eliminating unnecessary words and rearranging your phrases. Contributors:Ryan Weber, Nick HurmLast Edited: 2013-02-27 10:18:41 future tenses - will, going to, doing game future tenses - will, going to, doing: Practice future tenses - will, going to, doing using this ESL fun Game.This game is also excellent for classroom teaching. Teachers can engage students in a classroom vocabulary or grammar review. It is suitable for intermediate and advanced esl learners. The Passive Voice Passive and Active Voices Verbs are also said to be either active (The executive committee approved the new policy) or passive (The new policy was approved by the executive committee) in voice. In the active voice, the subject and verb relationship is straightforward: the subject is a be-er or a do-er and the verb moves the sentence along. In the passive voice, the subject of the sentence is neither a do-er or a be-er, but is acted upon by some other agent or by something unnamed (The new policy was approved).

Grammar. De Montfort This section enables you to focus on grammar awareness. By using the term 'grammar' we mean the placing of words in a certain order, with the correct endings, and linked together in a way that makes grammatical sense. Remember, the Centre for Learning and Study Support (CLaSS) can also help you to develop your academic writing. Difference Between Amiable and Amicable Amiable vs Amicable English and grammar is one of the subjects that we have to study in school. We were taught about language and how to use words properly. The tests would cover everything and require us to compose an essay about a subject that is important to us.

"To Be" Verbs: List of Strong Action Verbs and Eliminating 'To Be' Verbs in Students Vocaulary and Writing Strategies for Eliminating Be Verbs 1) Change the be verb to a strong verb: Example: Tony is afraid of notebook checks. Tony fears notebook checks. Example: Billy is alarmed by the proximity of the shark. Past participle – divided according to the pronunciation ,ENGAMES Last week I taught passive and present perfect tense. I thought that I was well prepared but in both cases we encountered one big problem. The students could not form the past participles correctly. So they fought with the past participles and completely ignored the grammar taught.

Word classes To discuss accuracy and style at the sentence level, we need to be able refer to the different word classes, or parts of speech (verb, noun, adjective, adverb, linker/ conjunction, etc.) we use in sentences. nouns give names to ideas, people, objects and actions verbs give meanings to sentences by telling us what things do, or what they are adjectives describe ideas, people, objects and actions, in other words, nouns and pronouns adverbs describe verbs and adjectives determiners (including articles) tell us which noun is being referred to prepositions show the relationship between nouns and other parts of the sentence linkers (or conjunctions) join similar parts of speech or whole clauses Questions about word classes Sometimes words have more than one meaning and fit into more than one category.

Grammar These OWL resources will help you use correct grammar in your writing. This area includes resources on grammar topics, such as count and noncount nouns, articles (a versus an), subject-verb agreement, and prepositions. Grammar-related exercises can be found here.

The Best of British - People Anorak - No - not an article of clothing (though it means that too), an anorak is another word for a nerd or a square. Apparently originated from the anoraks that were worn by trainspotters whatever the weather. If you are described as being a bit of an anorak, beware! Barmaid - A female bartender in a pub is called the barmaid. Barman - The bartender in a pub is called the barman. Barrister - An attorney that would represent you in court.

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