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La guerre de 14-18

La guerre de 14-18

http://expositions.bnf.fr/guerre14/index.htm

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World War I (1914–1919): Overview World War I took place between 1914 and 1918. Although the conflict began in Europe, it ultimately involved countries as far away as the United States and Japan. At the time, the English-speaking world knew it as the “Great War”—the term “World War I” was applied decades later. Historians still actively disagree over the fundamental causes of the war.

Teachers' Visual Guide to Using Google Calendar April , 2014 Google Calendar is one of the best free web tools I have been using for few years now. As a teacher, you can use Google Calendar for a wide variety of purposes. You can for instance create events and share them with your students and parents; you can use it to share important dates and information with students. Gallipoli Campaign Gallipoli Landings 25 April 1915 General Sir Ian Hamilton's invasion plan of 25 April was to land his infantry at strategic points along the Aegean coast of the Gallipoli peninsula. These units would then cross to the western side and take the Ottoman forts at Kilitbahir, thereby disabling their heavy guns and allowing the navy to pass unhindered through the narrows of the Dardanelles. The British 29th Division would land across 5 beaches named S, V, W, X and Y at Cape Helles, on the southernmost tip of the peninsula. They would then advance as one force, first taking the high ground of Achi Baba and the nearby village of Krithia, before crossing to capture the forts defending the narrows.

Untold Stories of the First World War Photos, letters and other memorabilia It was the war that tore Europe apart – a struggle between the central powers of Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey and Bulgaria, against the allied powers of Britain, France, Belgium, Russia, Italy and the USA. No European nation was left untouched – even neutral states felt the impact of the war. But it was the ordinary men and women who were affected the most. This exhibition gives those personal accounts from across Europe for the first time, based on stories and items contributed by the public. Renowned historian and WW1 author Peter Englund said: “This important and imaginative project tells the other side of the story, from the point of view of a young soldier who signed up seeking adventure, to the family devastated by news that he was one of millions who would never return.

Woven Finger-Knitting Hula-Hoop Rug DIY Here we go! I’m so excited to kick off this series of finger-knitting projects. For the first project, B proffered his largest ball of finger-knitting for us all to try weaving a rug! First World War internment camps a dark chapter in Canadian history Though the main battles of the First World War were fought across the ocean, back in Canada, there were prisoners and casualties of another kind. In 1914, immigrants from Austria-Hungary, Germany and the other Central Powers were rounded up and locked away in internment camps. More than 8,000 people who considered themselves Canadian were imprisoned for being “enemy aliens.”

5 great apps for fun lessons The ideal app can be just the thing to make a great lesson perfect. Here, educational psychologist and learning apps specialist Peter Maxwell lists five of his favourites. Apple have produced a series of ebooks to help teachers integrate apps into their daily classroom practice. The Apps in the Classroom series is inspired by Apple Distinguished Educators, and each book contains a collection of activities that allow students to utilize a particular app to demonstrate their learning. The books begin with an overview of the app in question before detailing possible activities.

World War II in Color: American Bombers and Their Crews, 1942 Within weeks of the December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and America’s official entry into the Second World War, Allied forces in Europe activated the now-legendary VIII Bomber Command (often referred to as the Eighth Air Force ) to serve as the principal American force to attack Germany from the air. Often in tandem with planes from the Royal Air Force, American B-24s and B-17s — or Flying Fortresses — from the “The Mighty 8th” would spend the next several years bombing strategic towns and cities in Nazi-held Europe. As a jumping off point for countless bombing runs, including many in broad daylight, the United States Army Air Forces (the predecessor of the U.S. Air Force) set up bases in England during the war. In 1942, LIFE’s Margaret Bourke-White spent time with the Bomber Command — an assignment that LIFE shared with its readers in an October 1942 feature notable, although hardly surprising, all these years later for its triumphant tone:

You are the Fleet Admiral of the Navy in WWI what do you do? The Situation You’re the Fleet Admiral of the Navy in World War I. Your ships are being sunk at an alarming rate by the devastatingly effective German U-Boat. The traditional camouflage isn’t working because your environment (sea and sky) changes with the weather. What do you do? This is the German U-Boat Sinking your Battleships

DIY: Wearable words When I was looking around for tutorials on making paper beads, I found some really striking "book beads" and accessories, now collected in this post. I understand (after all the browsing) that you can make really durable "beads" easily ... very little time, skill or money required. Woohoo! Who doesn't need more jewelery? (UPDATE 6/12: See the follow up post for more wordy accessories) BBC Schools - Life in the trenches 31 October 2014Last updated at 15:07 Two British soldiers standing in a flooded communication trench during World War One On the Western Front, the war was fought in trenches. Site consacré à l'illustration "...quite possibly the richest source of book-related design and illustration in the universe. Will displays the fervour of the most dedicated historian whilst time and again proving he has an eye for exceptional images." —David Pearson Read Steven Heller's write-up of 50 Watts on his Atlantic blog. From August 2007 to February 2011 I blogged as A Journey Round My Skull.

The British Soldier Who Killed Nazis with a Sword and a Longbow "Mad Jack" on the far right, clutching a claymore sword. Photo via WikiCommons The first thing the Nazi garrison on Vågsøy Island, Norway, would have heard when the British No. 3 Commando battalion landed on December 27, 1941, was the sudden blaring drone of bagpipes.

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