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Kemilektioner för grundskolan - Tolv månadsteman

Kemilektioner för grundskolan - Tolv månadsteman

http://www.ikem.se/vi-arbetar-med_1/for-skolan-larare-och-elever/grundskolan-kemilektioner

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10 Incredible Chemical Reaction GIFs Explained We encounter thousands of chemical reactions every day: plants use them in photosynthesis, metals rust over time, and combustion reactions provide us with heat and light, among thousands of other daily uses. Chemical reactions occur when reactants transform into new substances, called products, through creating and breaking bonds between atoms. Sometimes the process creates some pretty wild effects. Check out our top 10 chemical reactions below: 1) Disintegration (Mercury Reacts with Aluminum) Image credit: Theodore Gray via Youtube Getting Started with Metacognition Y'all my office smells like something died. Seriously! It started about two weeks ago. I walked in and got hit with a pretty putrid smell. So, naturally, I started to search. I looked everywhere and honestly, there are not that many places to look.

STEAM Project: Tiny Dancers (A Homopolar Motor) Today we are getting a bit artsy with our science! Does the idea of making a wire sculpture that “dances” entice you……? Tiny Dancers is the third project in our collaborative series STEAM POWER: Empowering kids to explore the world through creative projects. Today’s topic is HARNESS! Because harnessing refers to making use of resources to produce energy we decided to try making a homopolar motor. A homopolar motor is probably the simplest DIY motor you can make. Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices When presented with new material, standards, and complicated topics, we need to be focused and calm as we approach our assignments. We can use brain breaks and focused-attention practices to positively impact our emotional states and learning. They refocus our neural circuitry with either stimulating or quieting practices that generate increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, where problem solving and emotional regulation occur. Brain Breaks

Bra flippar till NP i fysik 2016 Upload Micael Lindqvist Loading... Working... Apple Science Experiment Fall is here and apples are everywhere! We have been having fun with apple books and crafts and decided to do a little apple experimenting too. The kids love acid and base reactions, but this time instead of combining them we observed to see what effects they would have on apples. Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Great Websites to Teach Anatomy o... September, 2014 looking for some amazing web tools to teach human anatomy? The websites I have assorted for you below are probably among the best you can find out there. From engaging interactives to live simulations of the body system, these tools will enable your students to explore the mystery of the human body in unprecedented ways.

She Begins To Pour Milk In A Bag. Seconds Later? The Best Treat Ever She Begins To Pour Milk In A Bag. Seconds Later? The... Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 5 Things Every Teacher Should Be Able to Do On YouTube January, 2015 After the post I shared here on how to create flipped videos via the use of annotations and other interactivity features on YouTube, I received a couple of emails from fellow teachers asking about certain functionalities on YouTube. Instead of answering each one individually, I decided to create this post and include in it the major important things a teacher should be able to do on YouTube. Here is what you will get to learn from these tips:Know how to add subtitles and closed captions to your videosAdd and edit annotationsuse enhancement features to improve your videosHow to use YouTube video editor to combine, trim, add music and customize your clipsHow to search YouTube library for copyright-free music to add to your videosHow to swap the audio track on our videos Click on each title to access its corresponding resource page. 3- How to Add Annotations to Your Videos Annotations help you engage with viewers and make your videos more interactive.

Ice melting and evaporating - Stock Video Clip K001/0886 Credit: ANIMATE4.COM/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Caption: Animation of ice melting into liquid water, and then turning into vapour. At the start, the ice exists in a regular hexagonal crystal lattice, with the hydrogen atoms (white) on each water molecule forming hydrogen bonds (blue lines) with an adjacent oxygen atom. This regular arrangement makes ice occupy a larger volume than liquid water. After a pulse of heat (red), the lattice breaks down, as the molecules gain enough energy to disrupt the hydrogen bonding, forming liquid water. After another pulse of heat, the molecules gain enough energy to leave the liquid state altogether, escaping as water vapour, a process called evaporation.

Investigating Gummy Bears Guest blog post by Amy Alvis I was looking on Pinterest for a lab to use with my students to teach them the scientific method. The students will have science fair project to do at the end of the year and I wanted to take them step by step through the process so that they will know exactly what to do for their projects. I found a gummy bear science lab by Sue at Science for Kids: Adventures of an Elementary School Science Teacher. It is an awesome lab, but I wanted my students to have a more complex scientific method model to work with. Click the image below to download the lab worksheets I created for this activity.

Here's Why McDonald's Burgers Don’t Rot Earlier this week, Buzzfeed posted a video that showed burgers from seven different fast food restaurants that had been stored in glass jars for 30 days. At the end, some of them were covered in mold, but some (McDonald burgers in particular) did not look much different from Day 1. This isn’t a new visual aid. Karen Hanrahan famously purchased a McDonald’s hamburger in 1996 that she still carries around as a prop to discourage consumption of fast food in favor of unprocessed food. Countless others have done the same.

You Know How This Experiment Ends, But You Should Watch It Anyway Kinja is in read-only mode. We are working to restore service. First off, I have to marvel at how incredible this is to watch and admit that it made me too gawk, giggle, and grin like a child. I can't wait to show people this. That said, does anyone else wonder how much it had to cost to spend the 3 hours pumping out the air, setting up, and conducting this experiment that everyone know the result of?

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