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Apple Science Experiment

Apple Science Experiment
Fall is here and apples are everywhere! We have been having fun with apple books and crafts and decided to do a little apple experimenting too. The kids love acid and base reactions, but this time instead of combining them we observed to see what effects they would have on apples. We began by choosing which acids and bases we were going to use. The acids were easy, lemon juice and vinegar are two we always have, but I didn’t know of any bases other than baking soda! After some Googling we found out that Milk of Magnesia is a base too! The kids made predictions about what would happen to the apples and wrote them in their notebooks. They next morning we checked on them and saw some changes! We had hypothesized that the ones in the apples would stay fresh the longest and now realized our prediction was not going to come true. The next day all of the apples were even more brown except the ones in lemon juice! This was an easy experiment to set up with the kids! This linky list is now closed.

http://www.coffeecupsandcrayons.com/apple-science-experiment/

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