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Cult of Pedagogy

http://www.cultofpedagogy.com/

Related:  May 2016 Faculty WorkshopReading and Writing in CollegeLearning Strategies and Instructional ResourcesArticles, webpages, etc. to read when I have time

How Educators Should Understand Hillary Clinton’s Server When it comes to technology, teachers are too often treated as imbeciles or felons! In 1990, I was hired to teach public school 4th grade. By that time, I had already been engaging children in collaborative online projects for several years and sbsing a telephone for most of my twenty-seven years on earth. Two days into the school year I rebelled against the absurdity of not having a working telephone in my classroom, went to Radio Shack, purchased a $3 phone splitter, found a barely used telephone sitting in an abandoned office, connected the splitter, and began pulling a spool of phone cable down the school corridor. A custodian noticed my efforts and asked if I would like him to drill a few holes to make the job tidier. A few minutes later, I had a computer connected to the Internet via modem so that my students could work on National Geographic Kids Network science projects.

Institute for Writing and Rhetoric Though the connection between reading and writing seems to be a "given," reading was not always a dominant force in writing classrooms. In the nineteenth century, students did not typically write analyses of what they read, but instead wrote themes on prescribed topics, such as Vanity, Democracy, Ethics, and so on. Reading and writing became curricularly linked at the turn of the century, when Harvard and other universities decided that reading literature was essential to learning to write. The reasons for this curricular link are the same today as they were one hundred years ago. Those who argue in favor of reading in the writing classroom claim that reading inspires students, introducing them to great ideas and improving their ability to think critically and analytically. Moreover, reading centers class discussion, giving students something to talk about beyond their own personal experiences.

Find Your Marigold: The One Essential Rule for New Teachers Welcome to your first year of teaching. This year will test you more intensely than just about anything you’ve done up to now. It will deplete all your energy, bring you to tears, and make you question every talent or skill you thought you had. But all these tests, if you approach them the right way, will leave you better and stronger than you are today. Advice is available everywhere you look, and some of it is very good. Still, with everything you have to do right now, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the sheer volume of it all. Teaching and Learning News provide by Expert Educational Consultants In this episode, Alan speaks with Ewan McIntosh, Founder of NoTosh, out of Edinburgh, Scotland. The two begin with a discussion about Ewan’s work with design thinking for developing a new learning ecology within an International Baccalaureate school in Barcelona, Spain. This leads in to a conversation about the emotional process teachers go through in relinquishing some of their established control within the classroom. Finally, they discuss the role of school leaders and the key shifts they must make in order to jump into the design thinking process within their schools. Ewan has been a keynote speaker, a pre-conference master […]

A Map of Learning Theory Concepts, Theorists, Paradigms and Disciplines Learning theory is complex, and while the graphic below may initially seem to reinforce that idea, it actually makes a complicated topic very digestible. Richard Millwood is an assistant professor at Trinity College Dublin, and he also runs Core Education, a nonprofit that helps schools use technology for better learning outcomes. As part of his work for the HoTEL Project (Holistic Approach to Technology Enhanced Learning), Millwood created this guide to learning theories. On his blog, Millwood describes his motivation to collect information and resources about learning theories featured in the map:

Gold Standard PBL: Essential Project Design Elements Adapted from Setting the Standard for Project Based Learning: A Proven Approach to Rigorous Classroom Instruction, by John Larmer, John Mergendoller, Suzie Boss (ASCD 2015). This post is also available as a downloadable article. It’s encouraging that Project Based Learning is becoming popular, but popularity can bring problems. Here at the Buck Institute for Education, we’re concerned that the recent upsurge of interest in PBL will lead to wide variation in the quality of project design and classroom implementation. If done well, PBL yields great results. Graphic Organizers Prepared by Tracey Hall & Nicole Strangman Please visit the AIM Center home page. Introduction One way to help make a curriculum more supportive of students and teachers is to incorporate graphic organizers.

5 Teaching Practices I'm Kicking to the Curb So many of us teach the way we were taught. We may not even realize we’re doing it. And that means certain practices get passed down year after year without question, methods that are such a normal part of the way we do school, we perpetuate them without realizing there are better alternatives. Today I’m going to roll out five of these for your consideration: five teaching practices used every day that are not backed by research. EdTech Acronyms Explained – EDTECH 4 BEGINNERS The amount of new acronyms in the educational technology world is staggering… and often overwhelming for educators. In fact, this list will be up to date for a few hours and then more acronyms and terms will come along! But have a look and get familiar with what they stand for: 1:1 – One to one (usually talking about the ratio of devices in a class per child). API – Application Programming Interface.

An Annotated List of Flipped Class Tools and Resources – Turn to Your Neighbor: The Official Peer Instruction Blog Flipped Class Tool and Resource List from Turn to Your Neighbor We will keep a (clearly very incomplete) list of tools and resources we use and/or discover relative to flipped teaching here. Help us grow this list using the form at the bottom of the page. We try to emphasize free tools on this page. There are many paid, inexpensive tools that we are big fans of including Screenflow (screencasting software) and Learning Catalytics (classroom response and assessment system).

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