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*A Copyright-Friendly Toolkit (Valenza)

However fabulous Creative Commons and Public Domain content may be, sometimes you really need to use copyrighted material. Say you plan to comment on popular media or current events. For instance, you may be planning to critique the portrayal of Native Americans in commercial films. You are going to want to “quote” some commercial films like Pocahontas, Lone Ranger, and Dances with Wolves. If you are reviewing a book, you may want to share its cover art. You may use copyrighted content without asking permission if you believe that your use falls under the doctrine known as Fair Use. In general, when you transform original content, repurpose it, and add value to it in your own remix, you may be able to claim the use fair. According to American University’s Center for Media and Social Impact, these two tests or questions help you plan whether to use the copyrighted work of others without asking permission: The video below explains why the Code for Fair Use in Online Video was created.

https://www.smore.com/f677-a-copyright-friendly-toolkit

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Why I want you to steal my ideas Please don’t steal my car. If you drive away with it, I won’t have it any more, which is a real hassle. Please don’t steal my identity or my reputation either. Neither travels well, and all the time you’re using it, you’re degrading something that belongs to me. But my ideas? More Information on Fair Use Fair use is a legal doctrine that promotes freedom of expression by permitting the unlicensed use of copyright-protected works in certain circumstances. Section 107 of the Copyright Act provides the statutory framework for determining whether something is a fair use and identifies certain types of uses—such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research—as examples of activities that may qualify as fair use. Section 107 calls for consideration of the following four factors in evaluating a question of fair use: Purpose and character of the use, including whether the use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes: Courts look at how the party claiming fair use is using the copyrighted work, and are more likely to find that nonprofit educational and noncommercial uses are fair. In addition to the above, other factors may also be considered by a court in weighing a fair use question, depending upon the circumstances.

5-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more.

Internet Copyright Infringement - 5 Myths vs. Facts Embed Code For hosted site: Click the code to copy Internet Filtering at Schools Is Problematic Giving all children access to the Internet and computing became a rallying cry for educators and elected leaders in the 1990s. In March 1996, President Clinton and Vice President Gore led 20,000 volunteers in a one-day effort to connect thousands of California public schools to the “brave new world of mouse clicking and web surfing.” Yet that brave new world remains unconquered for many students and schools, especially in rural and high-poverty communities. Some have coined the term “digital redlining” to describe how advanced technology has been deliberately denied from certain areas based on geography as well as the race, ethnicity, and income of residents.

About The Licenses Our public copyright licenses incorporate a unique and innovative “three-layer” design. Each license begins as a traditional legal tool, in the kind of language and text formats that most lawyers know and love. We call this the Legal Code layer of each license. But since most creators, educators, and scientists are not in fact lawyers, we also make the licenses available in a format that normal people can read — the Commons Deed (also known as the “human readable” version of the license). The Commons Deed is a handy reference for licensors and licensees, summarizing and expressing some of the most important terms and conditions. Think of the Commons Deed as a user-friendly interface to the Legal Code beneath, although the Deed itself is not a license, and its contents are not part of the Legal Code itself.

The Optimistic Heart of Digital Citizenship Contributed by Renee Hobbs Let’s be frank: there’s a right way and a wrong way to teach digital citizenship. When people hear the term, digital citizenship, most people think of helping students to protect their privacy and be aware of their digital footprint. Copyright & creativity for ethical digital citizens - ikeepsafe.org The project was sponsored in part by a generous grant from the Center for Copyright Information. Click here to review the curriculum without providing your information. With Special Thanks iKeepSafe would like to thank the many experts who contributed to Copyright & Creativity for Ethical Digital Citizens. Legal Review Center for Copyright Information,attorneys and experts

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