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Optical Illusions and Visual Phenomena

Optical Illusions and Visual Phenomena
Op­ti­cal il­lu­sion are fas­ci­nat­ing while teach­ing us about our vi­sual per­cep­tion, and lim­its thereof. My em­pha­sis here is on the beauty of per­cep­tual phe­nom­ena, on in­ter­ac­tive ex­per­i­ments, and ex­pla­na­tion of the vi­sual mech­a­nisms in­volved – to the de­gree that they are un­der­stood Be­friend­ing mo­bile de­vices: >50 in­ter­ac­tive demos now with­out Flash, but re­quire up-to-date browser ver­sions. Don’t let it irk you if you don’t see all the phe­nom­ena de­scribed. For many il­lu­sions, there is a per­cent­age of peo­ple with per­fectly nor­mal vi­sion who just don’t see it, often for rea­sons cur­rently un­known. If you are not a vi­sion sci­en­tist, you might find my ex­pla­na­tion at­tempts too high­brow.

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Commute Map In Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says About Us), the author states that commute times throughout history have remained steady at roughly a half hour in each direction. Advances in transportation technology (our feet, horses, bicycles, trains, automobiles, flying cars, etc.) allow us to live farther from where we work. This got me thinking about my own commute from Berkeley to San Francisco, how it compares to those of my neighbors, and how commutes vary across the country. This visualization draws a red circle at the center of each zip code indicating the number of people who travel to or from that area. The blue lines show the driving directions. Notes About The Data

List of paradoxes This is a list of paradoxes, grouped thematically. The grouping is approximate, as paradoxes may fit into more than one category. Because of varying definitions of the term paradox, some of the following are not considered to be paradoxes by everyone. This list collects only scenarios that have been called a paradox by at least one source and have their own article. untitled Eudaimonia Suite On thinking further about my lifelong philosophy project, I've come to see it as a six-part suite on the theme of eudaimonia. Just I have likened my set of Yes arrangements for solo electric bass to a Bach Cello Suite, so the six books I'm writing on the philosophy of happiness might comprise a kind of suite:

Test Your Brain With Brain Teasers and Games Here you can enjoy the Top 25 Brain Teasers, Games & Illusions that SharpBrains readers (primarily adults, but some younger minds too) have enjoyed the most. It is always good to learn more about our brains and to exercise them!. Fun experiments on how our brains and minds work 1. You think you know the colors? Try the Stroop Test 30 Questions Guaranteed to Make You Think Instead of giving you information that you want, I’m going to teach you something today by being indirect. Here’s the lesson: everything you need, every revelation I’ve had, and everything that I could possibly write about on this blog, ca n be found inside yourself. As in – with the proper thinking and questioning, you too can come to the conclusions that I’ve come to. You can help yourself instead of depending on me for help. “But Brett,” you ask, “Won’t that render you obsolete?

How Google Tests Software How Google Tests Software James Whittaker of Google Last week I attended a fantastic and fascinating QASIG talk by James Whittaker of Google. The Superplexus This is the three-dimensional spherical labyrinth that challenges the limits of your manual dexterity and spatial understanding as you maneuver a 5/8" wooden marble through its entire course. The Superplexus is a complex network of chicanes, multi-planar hairpin turns, spirals, and staircases--even a vortex. Hand made from 3- and 6-ply Finnish birch that form the track, over 400 hours are involved in its construction. The labyrinth is set inside a 36" diameter acrylic sphere affixed to a Jatoba base using a stainless steel gimbaled mount that allows you to tilt the sphere in any direction to guide the marble. The entire track laid out on a straight line is 31' longer than a football field.

Interactive graphics for data analysis I got a copy of Martin Theus and Simon Urbanek’s Interactive Graphics for Data Analysis a couple of years ago, whence it’s been sat on my bookshelf. Since I’ve recently become a self-proclaimed expert on interactive graphics I thought it was about time I read the thing. Which is exactly what I did last weekend at the Leeds Festival (in between rocking out). It’s a book of two halves, and despite the title the interactivity isn’t really the focus. The book is actually a guide on how to do exploratory data analysis. The first half of the book works like an advanced chart chooser, explaining which plots are useful for which types of data, and what types of interactivity they can benefit from.

Very Difficult Analytical Puzzles 3. The Fake Coin You have twelve coins. You know that one is fake.

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