background preloader

Chaos magic

Chaos magic
The chaosphere is a popular symbol of chaos magic. Many variants exist. For more, see Symbol of Chaos. General principles[edit] Chaos magicians are often seen by other occultists as dangerous or worrisome revolutionaries.[2] History[edit] Origins and creation[edit] This magical discipline was first formulated in West Yorkshire, England in the 1970s.[4] A meeting between Peter J. Influences[edit] Following Spare's death, magicians continued to experiment outside of traditional magical orders. Early days[edit] The first edition of Liber Null does not include the term "chaos magic", but only refers to magic or "the magic art" in general.[6] Texts from this period consistently claim to state principles universal to magic, as opposed to a new specific style or tradition of magic, and describe their innovations as efforts to rid magic of superstitious and religious ideas. Chaos came to be part of this movement defined as "the 'thing' responsible for the origin and continued action of events[...].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaos_magic

Related:  MagycksreligionSouljodiknightEsoteric studies

Symbol of Chaos Symbol of Chaos Variant of Symbol of Chaos, the "Chaosphere" of chaos magic The Symbol of Chaos originates from Michael Moorcock's Eternal Champion stories. In them, the Symbol of Chaos comprises eight arrows in a radial pattern. Lucifer Lucifer is the second of the archangels created by God and the creator of demons. Lucifer was sealed away in the Cage for centuries for the creation of demon kind until his release caused by Sam Winchester, where he would go about bringing forth the Apocalypse, until he was re-sealed with in the Cage by Sam where he is currently trapped with Michael and Adam Milligan. History God created the archangels; Michael, Lucifer, Raphael, and Gabriel. Lucifer formed an especially strong bond with his brother Michael.

Goetia Aleister Crowley's variant of the circle and triangle, used in the evocation of the seventy-two spirits of the Ars Goetia. Goetic Theurgy, another practice described in the Lesser Key of Solomon, is similar to the book's description of Goetia, but is used to invoke aerial spirits. Etymology[edit] Magick and the Occult: Who Was Franz Bardon? Who Was Franz Bardon? Tim Scott Franz Bardon is one of the most important but least known occultists and magicians of the Twentieth Century. Magic carpet A magic carpet, also called a flying carpet, is a legendary carpet that can be used to transport persons who are on it instantaneously or quickly to their destination. In literature[edit] One of the stories in the One Thousand and One Nights relates how Prince Husain, the eldest son of Sultan of the Indies, travels to Bisnagar (Vijayanagara) in India and buys a magic carpet[1] This carpet is described as follows: "Whoever sitteth on this carpet and willeth in thought to be taken up and set down upon other site will, in the twinkling of an eye, be borne thither, be that place nearhand or distant many a day's journey and difficult to reach."[2] The literary traditions of several other cultures also feature magical carpets, in most cases literally flying rather than instantly transporting their passengers from place to place. Another of Vasnetsov's renderings of the same subject

Spheres Of Light (SOL) ** Exact dates and times are from - Equinox and Solstice data from the U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington DC. Cross-Quarter moments are interpolated as the midway points between the Solstices and Equinoxes measured in degrees along the ecliptic. Former NASA scientist Rollin Gillespie uses this spatial method rather than simply splitting in half the time interval between a Solstice and an Equinox.) The Wheel of the Year

The Shepherd of Hermas The Shepherd of Hermas (Greek: Ποιμὴν τοῦ Ἑρμᾶ; sometimes just called The Shepherd) is a Christian literary work of the 2nd century, considered a valuable book by many Christians, and considered canonical scripture by some of the early Church fathers such as Irenaeus.[1][2] The Shepherd had great authority in the 2nd and 3rd centuries.[3] It was bound as part of the New Testament[1] in the Codex Sinaiticus, and it was listed between the Acts of the Apostles and the Acts of Paul in the stichometrical list of the Codex Claromontanus. The work comprises five visions, twelve mandates, and ten parables. It relies on allegory and pays special attention to the Church, calling the faithful to repent of the sins that have harmed it. The book was originally written in Rome, in the Greek language, but a Latin translation was made very shortly afterwards. Only the Latin version has been preserved in full; of the Greek, the last fifth or so is missing. Contents[edit]

List of demons in the Ars Goetia The demons' names (given below) are taken from the Ars Goetia, which differs in terms of number and ranking from the Pseudomonarchia Daemonum of Johann Weyer. As a result of multiple translations, there are multiple spellings for some of the names, which are given in the articles concerning them.[1][2] Demons[edit] King Baal (Bael)[edit] Advanced Esoteric Astrology : Lynn Koiner - Astrological Research NOTE: The esoteric and hierarchical rulerships are given separately on this website. In the 1980s, I developed my own theories on Esoteric Astrology and its theory of Triangles of Energy. I am posting my lecture notes for anyone to use in their own research. The following are areas that I have researched in the field of Esoteric Astrology:

Related:  musiqueReligion