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Shambhala

Shambhala
In Tibetan Buddhist and Hindu traditions, Shambhala (also spelled Shambala or Shamballa; Sanskrit: शंभाल; Tibetan: བདེ་འབྱུང་; Wylie: bde 'byung, pron. de-jung; Chinese: 香巴拉; pinyin: xiāngbālā) is a kingdom hidden somewhere in Inner Asia. It is mentioned in various ancient texts, including the Kalachakra Tantra[2] and the ancient texts of the Zhang Zhung culture which predated Tibetan Buddhism in western Tibet. The Bön[3] scriptures speak of a closely related land called Olmolungring. Hindu texts such as Vishnu Purana (4.24) mention the village Shambhala as the birthplace of Kalki, the final incarnation of Vishnu who will usher in a new Golden Age (Satya Yuga).[4] Whatever its historical basis, Shambhala gradually came to be seen as a Buddhist Pure Land, a fabulous kingdom whose reality is visionary or spiritual as much as physical or geographic. §In the Buddhist Kalachakra teachings[edit] Shambhala is ruled over by Lord Maitreya. Manjushri Yashas (Tib. §See also[edit] §[edit] Related:  Soul Contracts

Beyul Guru Padmasambhava forecasted beyul while in the presence of Tibetan King Trisong Detsen and others at Samye Monastery :– “in the future when there will be warfare, strife, and difficult circumstances in the world, good people and dharma practitioners should travel to ‘Beyuls’ or hidden valleys situated south of the Tibetan Himalayan range for refuge.” In Buddhism, sacred environments are places to deeply enter the world, and to avoid escaping it. The qualities inherent in such places reveal the interconnectedness of all life and deepen awareness of the spirit and mind's hidden regions. Visiting beyul with good motivation and appropriate merit, the pilgrim can learn to see the world differently from the way it commonly appears, developing and enhancing the Buddhist virtues of wisdom and compassion. Inside beyul, people should abandon their negative actions. See also[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Norbu Sherpa, Lhakpa (2008).

Sanat Kumara Shamballah is said by the adherents to the Ascended Master Teachings, to be a floating city manifested on the etheric plane somewhere above the Gobi Desert in the borderlands of Mongolia.[4][5] The Great White Brotherhood is a spiritual 'fraternity' of Ascended Beings, including Lord Sunat Kumara, long since dedicated to the eventual Salvation of Mankind and the establishment of Divine Law again in this Three-dimensional reality. According to Elizabeth Van Buren, the Brotherhood once maintained (earthly) headquarters hidden in a remote valley near a sacred lake in old Tibet, until relatively recently, when, possibly due to the surmised threat of Communist China, they withdrew, allegedly through subterranean tunnels to an alternative earthly location in Peru, where they are still reported as having an earth base (circa 1985).[6] Sanat Kumara in Hinduism[edit] The Kumar resides in the most sublime center of our planet, Shamballa, the sahasrara of the world. Sanat Kumara in Theosophy[edit]

Great White Brotherhood History[edit] The Mahatma Letters began publication in 1881 with information purportedly revealed by "Koot Hoomi" to Alfred Percy Sinnett, and were also influential on the early development of the tradition. Koot Hoomi, through Sinnett, revealed that high-ranking members of mystic organizations in India and Tibet were able to maintain regular telepathic contact with one another, and thus were able to communicate to each other, and also to Sinnett, without the need for either written or oral communications, and in a manner similar to the way that spirit mediums claimed to communicate with the spirits of the dead. The letters published by Sinnett, which proposed the controversial doctrine of reincarnation, were said to have been revealed through this means.[5] Eckartshausen's idea was expanded in the teachings of Helena P. Ideas about this secret council of sages, under several names, were a widely shared feature of late nineteenth century and early twentieth century esotericism. " . . .

Kalachakra The Kalachakra (Sanskrit: कालचक्र Kālacakra, Tibetan: དུས་ཀྱི་འཁོར་ལོ།, Wylie: dus kyi 'khor lo; Mongolian: Цогт Цагийн Хүрдэн Tsogt Tsagiin Hurden; Chinese: 時輪) is a term used in Vajrayana Buddhism that means wheel of time or "time-cycles". The word Kālacakra is usually used to refer to a very complex teaching and practice in Tibetan Buddhism. Although the teaching is very advanced and esoteric, there is a tradition of offering it to large public audiences. Kālacakra tradition[edit] The Kālacakra deity represents a buddhahood and thus omniscience. The Kālacakra refers to many different traditions: for example, it is related to Hindu Shaiva, Samkhya, Vaishnava, Vedic, Upanishadic and Puranic traditions and also to Jainism. Text of the Kālacakra Tantra[edit] The Kālacakra Tantra is divided into five chapters.[4] Ground Kālacakra[edit] The first two chapters are considered the "ground Kālacakra." Path and fruition[edit] Astrology[edit] History and origin[edit] Manjushri Kirti (Tib. Practice[edit]

Kunlun Mountains The Kunlun Mountains (simplified Chinese: 昆仑山; traditional Chinese: 崑崙山; pinyin: Kūnlún Shān; Wade–Giles: K'un1-lun2 Shan1, pronounced [kʰu̯ə́nlu̯ə̌n ʂán]; Mongolian: Хөндлөн Уулс Hundlun) are one of the longest mountain chains in Asia, extending more than 3,000 km. In the broadest sense, it forms the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau south of the Tarim Basin and the Gansu Corridor and continues east south of the Wei River to end at the North China Plain. The exact definition of this range seems to vary. Extent[edit] From the Pamirs of Tajikistan, it runs east along the border between Xinjiang and Tibet autonomous regions to the Sino-Tibetan ranges in Qinghai province.[3] It stretches along the southern edge of what is now called the Tarim Basin, the infamous Takla Makan or "sand-buried houses" desert, and the Gobi Desert. Altyn-Tagh or Altun Range is one of the chief northern ranges of the Kunlun. The range has very few roads and in its 3,000 km length is crossed by only two.

8 Ways that Spirit Guides Communicate with Us - Forever Conscious Learning to connect with your spirit guides or angels is one of the most valuable tools you can undertake on your conscious journey. (Interested in learning how to connect? Read: How to Connect with your Spirit Guides.) Connecting is one thing, but how do we know when we are receiving a message? Here are 8 of the most common ways that Spirit Guides or Angels communicate with us: 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) 6.) 7.) 8.) While these are some of the common ways that our angels or guides communicate with us we have to remain open to the fact that communication can also be personal and unique depending on the situation and person. Join the Forever Conscious community and receive access to special promotions, information and more.

Azrael Background[edit] Depending on the outlook and precepts of various religions in which he is a figure, Azrael may be portrayed as residing in the Third Heaven.[3] In one of his forms, he has four faces and four thousand wings, and his whole body consists of eyes and tongues, the number of which corresponds to the number of people inhabiting the Earth. He will be the last to die, recording and erasing constantly in a large book the names of men at birth and death, respectively.[4] He will receive the souls in the graves In Judaism[edit] In Jewish mysticism, he is commonly referred to as "Azriel," not "Azrael." In Christianity[edit] There is no reference to Azrael in the Catholic Bible, and he is not considered a canonical character within Christianity. While 2 Esdras is not considered canonical by most Christian views, several quotes from the book are used for the Requiem Anternam, showing that it still has some relevance to traditional Christian view points. In Islam[edit] In Sikhism[edit]

Zhangzhung Zhangzhung (Tibetan: ཞང་ཞུང་ ; Tibetan pronunciation: [ɕaŋɕuŋ]; Chinese: 象雄; Chinese pinyin : Xiàngxióng) was an ancient culture and kingdom of western and northwestern Tibet, which pre-dates the culture of Tibetan Buddhism in Tibet. Zhangzhung culture is associated with the Bon religion, which in turn, has influenced the philosophies and practices of Tibetan Buddhism. Zhangzhung people are mentioned frequently in ancient Tibetan texts as the original rulers of central and western Tibet. Recently, a tentative match has been proposed between the Zhangzhung and an Iron Age culture now being uncovered on the Changtang plateau of northwestern Tibet. §Extent of the Zhang Zhung kingdoms[edit] Tradition has it that Zhang Zhung consisted "of three different regions: sGob-ba, the outer; Phug-pa, the inner; and Bar-ba, the middle. The Territorial Extent of Ladakh during the period of King Nyimagon about 975 A. §History of the Zhangzhung[edit] §Paleolithic findings[edit] §See also[edit] §[edit]

Chakravartin Chakravartin/Chakraborty (Sanskrit: चक्रवर्ति; Pali: cakkavatti) is an ancient Indian term used to refer to an ideal universal ruler, who rules ethically and benevolently over the entire world. Such a ruler's reign is called sarvabhauma. It is a bahuvrīhi, literally meaning "whose wheels are moving", in the sense of "whose chariot is rolling everywhere without obstruction". In Buddhism and Jainism, three types of Chakravartins are distinguished:[1] Chakravala Chakraborty a ruler over all four continents postulated in ancient Indian cosmographyDvipa Chakraborty a ruler over only one of four continentsPradesa Chakraborty: a ruler over only part of a continent. The first references to a cakravala cakraborty appear in monuments from the time of the Maurya Empire (322–185 BCE), dedicated to Chandragupta Maurya and his grandson Ashoka Maurya. In general, the term applies to temporal as well as spiritual kingship and leadership, particularly in Buddhism and Jainism. Maitrayaniya Upanishad[edit]

Violet Flame (1) The violet flame is a considerate flame. It is a loving flame. It is a grateful flame. Those who work in the healing arts understand color has unique healing properties. The violet ray is one of the seven rays and the ray that is descending for the Age of Aquarius. I AM a being a violet fire! We can also use the centering technique to increase the effectiveness of this mantra (decree): Put your thumb, index, and middle fingers of your left hand together and place them in the middle of your chest next to your heart. I AM a being of violet fire! The violet flame can be used to help Mother Earth and the nature spirits (elementals), too. The earth is a planet of violet fire!

Holon Place in Israel Holon (Hebrew: חוֹלוֹן‬ (audio) ; Arabic: حُولُون‎ Ḥūlūn) is a city on the central coastal strip south of Tel Aviv, Israel. Holon is part of the metropolitan Gush Dan area. Etymology[edit] The name of the city comes from the Hebrew word holon, meaning "(little) sand". History[edit] Holon was founded on sand dunes six kilometers (3.7 miles) from Tel Aviv in 1935.[3] The Łódzia textile factory was established there by Jewish immigrants from Łódź, Poland, along with many other industrial enterprises.[3] In the early months of the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, Holon was on the front line, with constant shooting taking place on the border with the village of Tel A-Rish to its northwest—a suburb of Arab Jaffa—and clashes also in the direction of the town of Yazur to the east. Convoy being assembled at Holon. 1948 After the establishment of the state, Holon expanded to include Tel A-Rish (renamed "Tel Giborim", "The Mound of the Heroes") and the orange groves of Yazur. Mayors[edit]

Baphomet "Bahomet" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Bahamut. The 19th century image of a Sabbatic Goat, created by Eliphas Levi. The arms bear the Latin words SOLVE (separate) and COAGULA (join together), i.e., the power of "binding and loosing" usurped from God and, according to Catholic tradition, from the ecclesiastical hierarchy acting as God's representative on Earth. The original goat pentagram first appeared in the book "La Clef de la Magie Noire" by French occultist Stanislas de Guaita, in 1897. Baphomet (/ˈbæfɵmɛt/; from Medieval Latin Baphometh, Baffometi, Occitan Bafometz) is a term originally used to describe an idol or other deity that the Knights Templar were accused of worshiping, and that subsequently was incorporated into disparate occult and mystical traditions. §History[edit] The name Baphomet appeared in July 1098 in a letter by the crusader Anselm of Ribemont: Two Templars burned at the stake, from a French 15th-century manuscript §Alternative etymologies[edit]

A Glossary of Pali and Buddhist Terms This glossary covers many of the Pali words and technical terms that you may come across in the books and articles available on this website. The "[MORE]" link that follows some entries will take you to a more detailed article on the selected topic. Abhidhamma: (1) In the discourses of the Pali canon, this term simply means "higher Dhamma," and a systematic attempt to define the Buddha's teachings and understand their interrelationships. (2) A later collection of analytical treatises based on lists of categories drawn from the teachings in the discourses, added to the Canon several centuries after the Buddha's life. [MORE] abhiññā: Intuitive powers that come from the practice of concentration: the ability to display psychic powers, clairvoyance, clairaudience, the ability to know the thoughts of others, recollection of past lifetimes, and the knowledge that does away with mental effluents (see āsava). ācariya: Teacher; mentor. adhiṭṭhāna: Determination; resolution. ajaan, ajahn, achaan, etc

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