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Kundalini

Kundalini
Kundalini chakra diagram Kundalini (Sanskrit kuṇḍalinī, कुण्डलिनी, pronunciation ) stems from yogic philosophy as a form of feminine shakti or "corporeal energy".[1] Kundalini is described within Eastern religious, or spiritual, tradition as an indwelling spiritual energy that can be awakened in order to purify the subtle system and ultimately to bestow the state of Yoga, or Divine Union, upon the 'seeker' of truth ".[2][3] The Yoga Upanishads describe Kundalini as lying "coiled" at the base of the spine, represented as either a goddess or sleeping serpent waiting to be awakened. In modern commentaries, Kundalini has been called an unconscious, instinctive or libidinal force.[1][4][5] It is reported that Kundalini awakening results in deep meditation, enlightenment and bliss.[6] This awakening involves the Kundalini physically moving up the central channel to reside within the Sahasrara Chakra above the head. Etymology[edit] The Sanskrit adjective kuṇḍalin means "circular, annular". and Related:  Soul

Angel An angel (from the Greek ἄγγελος - ángelos[1]) is a supernatural being or spirit, often depicted in humanoid form with feathered wings on their backs and halos around their heads, found in various religions and mythologies. The theological study of angels is known as "angelology". In Zoroastrianism and Abrahamic religions they are often depicted as benevolent celestial beings who act as intermediaries between Heaven and Earth, or as guardian spirits or a guiding influence.[2] The term "angel" has also been expanded to various notions of spirits found in many other religious traditions. Other roles of angels include protecting and guiding human beings, and carrying out God's tasks.[3] Etymology[edit] The word angel in English is a fusion of the Old English/Germanic word engel (with a hard g) and the Old French angele. Judaism[edit] The term מלאך (mal'āk̠) is also used in the Tanakh; a similar term, ملائكة (malā'ikah), is used in the Qur'an. "... Jewish angelic hierarchy[edit]

Abhijna The Buddha demonstrating control over the fire and water elements. Gandhara, 3rd century CE Abhijñā (Skt., Pali, abhiññā; Tib., mngon shes, མངོན་ཤེས་) has been translated generally as "knowing,"[1] "direct knowing"[2] and "direct knowledge"[3] or, at times more technically, as "higher knowledge"[1][4] and "supernormal knowledge. Pali literature[edit] In Pali literature, abhiññā refers to both the direct apprehension of dhamma (translated below as "states" and "qualities") as well as to specialized super-normal capabilities. Direct knowing of dhamma[edit] In SN 45.159, the Buddha describes "higher knowledge" (abhiññā) as a corollary to the pursuit of the Noble Eightfold Path:[4] What, monks, are the states to be comprehended with higher knowledge? Such direct knowledge, according to the Buddha, is obscured by desire and passion (chanda-rāga):[6] Monks, any desire-passion with regard to the eye is a defilement of the mind. Enumerations of special knowledges[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

Government Government of any kind currently affects every human activity in many important ways. For this reason, political scientists generally argue that government should not be studied by itself; but should be studied along with anthropology, economics, history, philosophy, science, and sociology. Political science Etymology From Middle English government,[citation needed] from Old French government[citation needed] (French gouvernement), from Latin gubernatio ("management, government"). Government is a compound formed from the Ancient Greek κυβερνάω (kubernaō, "I steer, drive, guide, pilot") and the Latin -mente, ablative singular of mēns (“mind”). Classifying government In political science, it has long been a goal to create a typology or taxonomy of polities, as typologies of political systems are not obvious.[5] It is especially important in the political science fields of comparative politics and international relations. The dialectical forms of government Aristarchic attributes Other attributes

Fruit - Exotic Foods at WomansDay.com They say an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but what about a cherimoya? Never heard of it? Cherimoya is a fruit native to the highlands of South America that Mark Twain once called "deliciousness itself." While you may be a pro when it comes to pears, avocados and mangos, there are plenty of fruits considered delicacies in other countries. From durian to salak, discover 10 exotic fruits that are cherished around the world. Rambutan This Ping-Pong-ball-size red fruit is indigenous to Malaysia, and has also been cultivated throughout Thailand, South Vietnam, Indonesia, the Philippines, India and Sri Lanka. Durian This Southeast Asian delicacy is known first and foremost for its potent odor, which is said to be similar to rotting food or garbage. African Cucumber Also known as the horned melon, jelly melon, kiwano or hedged gourd, the African cucumber is a vibrant fruit, featuring a mosaic of green and yellow colors on the inside and bright orange on the outside. Ackee Buddha's Hand Chayote

Samadhi Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Samādhi (समाधि en sanskrit devanāgarī)[1] est un terme sanskrit qui est lié à la philosophie indienne. Il correspond dans les Yoga Sūtra de Patañjali au huitième membre (aṅga) du Yoga. Il signifie complet (sam-) établissement, maintien, « reposition » (-ādhi) de la conscience, de l'attention. Son usage généralisé a entraîné un important élargissement sémantique: ce substantif masculin signifie « union, totalité, accomplissement, achèvement, mise en ordre, rangement, concentration totale de l’esprit, contemplation, absorption[2] ». Le samādhi dans la tradition bouddhique[modifier | modifier le code] Le samādhi en tant que concentration[modifier | modifier le code] En tant que concentration, le samādhi est associé à la pratique de méditation appelée samatha bhavana, le développement de la tranquillité. Plusieurs niveaux de concentrations sont distingués : Concentration grossière, ou préliminaire (parikamma samādhi) Ou concentration de proximité.

Deity In religious belief, a deity ( i/ˈdiː.ɨti/ or C. Scott Littleton's Gods, Goddesses, and Mythology defined a deity as "a being with powers greater than those of ordinary humans, but who interacts with humans, positively or negatively, in ways that carry humans to new levels of consciousness beyond the grounded preoccupations of ordinary life."[2] Historically, natural phenomena whose causes were not well understood, such as lightning and catastrophes such as earthquakes and floods, were attributed to them. Etymology[edit] The word "deity" derives from the Latin deus ("god"), which is related through a common Indo-European origin to Sanskrit deva ("god"), devi ("goddess"), divya ("transcendental", "spiritual"). Other words for the concept[edit] The English word "god" comes from Anglo-Saxon; similar words are found in many Germanic languages (for example, the German "Gott" — "god"). The Turkic word for god is Tengri; it exists as Tanrı in Turkish. Relation with humanity[edit] Polytheism[edit]

Six Yogas of Naropa The Six Yogas of Nāropa (Tib. Narö chö druk, na-ro'i-chos-drug), also called the six dharmas of Naropa.[1] Naro's six doctrines (Mandarin: Ming Xing Dao Liu Cheng Jiu Fa; rendered in English as: Wisdom Activities Path Six Methods of Accomplishment),[2] are a set of advanced Indo-Tibetan Buddhist tantric practices and a meditation sādhana compiled in and around the time of the Indian monk and mystic Nāropa (1016-1100 CE) and conveyed to his student Marpa the translator. The six yogas were intended in part to help in the attainment of siddhi and enlightenment in an accelerated manner. Six Yogas or Six Dharmas?[edit] Peter Alan Roberts notes that the proper terminology is "six Dharmas of Nāropa", not "six yogas of Nāropa": "Tilopa briefly described these six practices in a short verse text entitled Instructions on the Six Dharmas. Classification[edit] The six Dharmas are a synthesis or collection of the completion stage practices of several tantras. The six yogas[edit] Physical exercises[edit]

Shakti The goddess Manasa in a dense jungle landscape with a cobra and a swan. Shakti (Sanskrit pronunciation: [ˈʃʌktɪ]) (Devanagari: शक्ति; from Sanskrit shak, "to be able"), meaning "Power" or "empowerment," is the primordial cosmic energy and represents the dynamic forces that are thought to move through the entire universe in Hinduism.[1] Shakti is the concept, or personification, of divine feminine creative power, sometimes referred to as 'The Great Divine Mother' in Hinduism. On the earthly plane, shakti most actively manifests through female embodiment and creativity/fertility, though it is also present in males in its potential, unmanifest form.[2] Not only is Shakti responsible for creation, it is also the agent of all change. In Shaktism and Shaivism, Shakti is worshipped as the Supreme Being. Evolution[edit] A goddess statue at the Jain temple of Sravanbelagola, India Shakti/Parvati/Sati Peethas[edit] Hindu Goddess. Adi Parashakti[edit] Bhajans and Mantras[edit] Translation: Shaktism[edit]

Standing Up for Freedom Video Log in Cynthia Yildirim Standing Up for Freedom Directed by Carlos Lascano, this emotive piece of work takes us on a metaphorical journey showing mankind's struggle for freedom over the last half century. posted 3 years ago © 2014 Redux, Inc. about redux | contact us | copyright | legal

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