background preloader

Artificial intelligence

Artificial intelligence
AI research is highly technical and specialized, and is deeply divided into subfields that often fail to communicate with each other.[5] Some of the division is due to social and cultural factors: subfields have grown up around particular institutions and the work of individual researchers. AI research is also divided by several technical issues. Some subfields focus on the solution of specific problems. Others focus on one of several possible approaches or on the use of a particular tool or towards the accomplishment of particular applications. The central problems (or goals) of AI research include reasoning, knowledge, planning, learning, natural language processing (communication), perception and the ability to move and manipulate objects.[6] General intelligence is still among the field's long-term goals.[7] Currently popular approaches include statistical methods, computational intelligence and traditional symbolic AI. History[edit] Research[edit] Goals[edit] Planning[edit] Logic-based

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_intelligence

Related:  Artificial Intelligencebubble_up february14Data Anaylitics`test 1018

Outline of artificial intelligence The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to artificial intelligence: Artificial intelligence (AI) – branch of computer science that deals with intelligent behavior, learning, and adaptation in machines. Research in AI is concerned with producing machines to automate tasks requiring intelligent behavior. Branches of artificial intelligence[edit] Some applications of artificial intelligence[edit] Philosophy of artificial intelligence[edit] brain bomb People maligning a modern diet tend to poke fingers at the the last 30 - 40 years. During this time obesity became a majority issue in the United States, and diabetes and metabolic syndrome afflicted many millions. However, from a nutritional perspective, diets 100 years ago weren’t that terrific either. Obesity was uncommon, but among certain populations, major vitamin and mineral deficiencies were rampant and deadly. Today, it's rare to see scurvy or other famously maritime deficiency diseases aside from serious long-term alcoholics or eating disordered individuals.

AI Gaydar and Other Stories of the Death of Ignorance After the fall of the Berlin Wall, East German citizens were offered the chance to read the files kept on them by the Stasi, the much-feared Communist-era secret police service. To date, it is estimated that only 10 percent have taken the opportunity. In 2007, James Watson, the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, asked that he not be given any information about his APOE gene, one allele of which is a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Most people tell pollsters that, given the choice, they would prefer not to know the date of their own death—or even the future dates of happy events. Each of these is an example of willful ignorance.

Novel Finding: Reading Literary Fiction Improves Empathy How important is reading fiction in socializing school children? Researchers at The New School in New York City have found evidence that literary fiction improves a reader’s capacity to understand what others are thinking and feeling. Emanuele Castano, a social psychologist, along with PhD candidate David Kidd conducted five studies in which they divided a varying number of participants (ranging from 86 to 356) and gave them different reading assignments: excerpts from genre (or popular) fiction, literary fiction, nonfiction or nothing. After they finished the excerpts the participants took a test that measured their ability to infer and understand other people’s thoughts and emotions. The researchers found, to their surprise, a significant difference between the literary- and genre-fiction readers.

History of artificial intelligence The history of artificial intelligence (AI) began in antiquity, with myths, stories and rumors of artificial beings endowed with intelligence or consciousness by master craftsmen; as Pamela McCorduck writes, AI began with "an ancient wish to forge the gods." The seeds of modern AI were planted by classical philosophers who attempted to describe the process of human thinking as the mechanical manipulation of symbols. This work culminated in the invention of the programmable digital computer in the 1940s, a machine based on the abstract essence of mathematical reasoning. This device and the ideas behind it inspired a handful of scientists to begin seriously discussing the possibility of building an electronic brain. The field of AI research was founded at a conference on the campus of Dartmouth College in the summer of 1956.

Applications of artificial intelligence Artificial intelligence has been used in a wide range of fields including medical diagnosis, stock trading, robot control, law, remote sensing, scientific discovery and toys. However, many AI applications are not perceived as AI: "A lot of cutting edge AI has filtered into general applications, often without being called AI because once something becomes useful enough and common enough it's not labeled AI anymore," Nick Bostrom reports.[1] "Many thousands of AI applications are deeply embedded in the infrastructure of every industry." In the late 90s and early 21st century, AI technology became widely used as elements of larger systems, but the field is rarely credited for these successes. Computer science[edit] AI researchers have created many tools to solve the most difficult problems in computer science.

singular hubbing Udacity gives students videos that they can watch at their own pace and be continually quizzed on. This past August fellow Singularity Hub writer Aaron Saenz wrote about Udacity, the online university created by Stanford artificial intelligence professor and Google autonomous vehicle leader, Sebastian Thrun. At the time Thrun was gearing up to teach his Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course to a class of 200 at Stanford. But why teach 200 when you can teach 1,000…or 160,000? With Udacity, Thrun and fellow AI giant Peter Norvig created an online version of the course, and anyone that wanted to enroll could – for free.

Banking and financial services: New technology solves GDPR Data privacy is driving the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) in the UK, and yet it’s widely felt that banks and other financial services institutions have run out of time to find ways to comply with the requirements. Looming on the horizon for failing to comply is a dark cloud of significant financial penalties. Banking and financial services: New technology solves GDPR Ashton Young, writing for Data Centre News on 26th July 2017 in his article ‘Majority of Organisations Think They’re GPDR Compliant Actually Aren’t’, says a global study by Veritas says the fines that could be imposed for non-compliance could be up 4 percent of global annual turnover or 20 million euros – whatever is the greater – writes Graham Jarvis, Business and Technology Journalist.

Worried Sick Something strange was happening in New Zealand. In the fall of 2007, pharmacies across the country had begun dispensing a new formulation of Eltroxin—the only thyroid hormone replacement drug approved and paid for by the government and used by tens of thousands of New Zealanders since 1973. Within months, reports of side effects began trickling in to the government’s health-care monitoring agency. These included known side effects of the drug, such as lethargy, joint pain, and depression, as well as symptoms not normally associated with the drug or disease, including eye pain, itching, and nausea. Then, the following summer, the floodgates opened: in the 18 months following the release of the new tablets, the rate of Eltroxin adverse event reporting rose nearly 2,000-fold.1

Category:Artificial intelligence From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Subcategories This category has the following 32 subcategories, out of 32 total. Pages in category "Artificial intelligence"

Related:  rabsoundAI