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Ai Research - Creating a new form of life

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Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence The Machine Intelligence Research Institute (MIRI) is a non-profit organization founded in 2000 to research safety issues related to the development of Strong AI. The organization advocates ideas initially put forth by I. J. History[edit] In 2000, Eliezer Yudkowsky[7] and Internet entrepreneurs Brian and Sabine Atkins founded the Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence to "help humanity prepare for the moment when machine intelligence exceeded human intelligence".[8] At first, it operated primarily over the Internet, receiving financial contributions from transhumanists and futurists. In 2002, it published on its website the paper Levels of Organization in General Intelligence,[9] a preprint of a book chapter later included in a compilation of general AI theories, entitled "Artificial General Intelligence" (Ben Goertzel and Cassio Pennachin, eds.). The 2007 Singularity Summit took place on September 8-September 9, 2007, at the Palace of Fine Arts Theatre, San Francisco.

Codecademy Labs Most significant present-day AI developments Programming, Motherfucker - Do you speak it? Steve Steinberg on weak AI Steve Steinberg, former Legion of Doom member and current Wall Street hacker, posted a rare update to his .CSV blog, and it's a doozy. He unpacks two big developments in "weak" artificial intelligence that manage to slip under the radar, mostly because they don't involve emotional robots or bring The Singularity a few days closer. Along the way, he shreds insurance companies that seek to correlate bad credit with bad driving, and pokes at Google's trust of "man over machine," a "cultural quirk," as Steve puts it, that's overlooked amidst all the talk of algorithms and massive data sets. While strong AI still lies safely beyond the Maes-Garreau horizon (a vanishing point, perpetually fifty years ahead) a host of important new developments in weak AI are poised to be commercialized in the next few years. "new developments in AI"

Introduction to Android Development Mobiletuts+ will be covering all major mobile platforms - iPhone, Windows, Android and Blackberry. Today we'll be taking a look at Android development: explaining why people have choosen to work with Android and providing an overview of the Eclipse IDE and its Java, DDMS and debugging perspectives. Finally, you'll learn how to get started making your first Android app! Android 101 Tutorials: What is Android? Android is an open source mobile operating system that combines and builds upon parts of many different open source projects. Why Android? There are many advantages to developing for the Android platform: Zero startup costs to begin development. Prerequisites before continuing with this article include: You must download and install the Eclipse IDE. The Eclipse IDE Eclipse is a complex, multi-language, and extensible Integrated Development Environment (IDE). After opening Eclipse for the first time, select a workspace to save your project within. The Java Perspective The DDMS Perspective

6 Mashups of Music and Artificial Intelligence | Epicenter  If there is one thing computers do well, it’s math. All of music’s raw components — key, mode, melody, harmony and rhythm — can be expressed mathematically. As a result, computers can help people make music, even if they don’t know their elbow from an F clef. The following apps for computer, web browser and smartphone put the power of artificially intelligent music creation in your hands or let you hear music that was created or manipulated by machines. Without further ado: uJam One of the most impressive demonstrations I’ve seen this year, uJam is the brainchild of longtime audio-software developers Peter Gorges and Axel Hensen and their celebrity partners Hans Zimmer (film composer for Dark Knight, Gladiator, Lion King) and Pharrell Williams (producer for Madonna, Shakira, Gwen Stefani). Following the freemium model, uJam will be free to use on a basic level, with add-ons available for purchase. Emily Howell You can’t use the artificially intelligent Emily Howell software yourself.

Teach yourself to program We are entering the summer, the perfect time to improve yourself, you could go running or swimming, you could learn a new foreign language or perhaps you could learn to program. Self-learning is not as hard as it sounds, and it’s much easier than self-learning Spanish or French. There are really wonderful sources to start learning these new languages, understanding the concept behind programming and giving it a try with some interesting problems. Basic Programming Via XKCD To learn a new programming language, it’s much easier if you already know the concepts because you can start learning the new structures in no time. Programming Concepts : This is a brief tutorial for new programmers from the City University of New York. Learning a Language Whether you already know some programming languages or you are moving forward, you should choose a language to work with. Learning HTML Via Cyanide and Happiness HTML is quite a simple language that doesn't use variables or operations. Learning Python

Watson, Turing, and extreme machine learning One of best presentations at IBM’s recent Blogger Day was given by David Ferrucci, the leader of the Watson team, the group that developed the supercomputer that recently appeared as a contestant on Jeopardy. To many people, the Turing test is the gold standard of artificial intelligence. Put briefly, the idea is that if you can’t tell whether you’re interacting with a computer or a human, a computer has passed the test. But it’s easy to forget how subtle this criterion is. Turing proposes changing the question from “Can machines think?” Alan Turing was thinking explicitly of this: in his 1950 paper, he proposes question/answer pairs like this: Q: Please write me a sonnet on the subject of the Forth Bridge. A: Count me out on this one. Q: Add 34,957 to 70,764. A: (Pause about 30 seconds and then give as answer) 105,621. We’d never think of asking a computer the first question, though I’m sure there are sonnet-writing projects going on somewhere. “What is interesting in 30TB?” Related:

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