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Wealth Inequality in America

Wealth Inequality in America

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPKKQnijnsM

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EU migrant crisis: What we know about Syrian refugee boys Aylan and Galip Kurdi The Turkish smuggler who owned the boat is believed to have abandoned it when the sea became rough, leaving the passengers struggling to control it for an hour before it overturned. The boys’ father, Abdullah, was one of the few survivors. He was in the sea for three hours before he was rescued by the Greek coastguard. He tried to hold onto his family but one by one they were washed from his grasp. Where had they come from? The Kurdi family, who are ethnic Kurds, had fled the conflict in Syria, where they lived in the war-torn town of Kobane.

Poodwaddle POODWADDLE WORLD CLOCKThe World Stats Counter (V 7.0) This minute 250 babies will be born, 100 people will die, 20 violent crimes will be reported, and the US debt will climb $1 million. The World Clock tells more than time. It shows a live picture of our changing world. The World Clock is too large for a single page.

Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong Source: Data from Richard Reeves and Isabel Sawhill America is the land of opportunity, just for some more than others. That's because, in large part, inequality starts in the crib. Rich parents can afford to spend more time and money on their kids, and that gap has only grown the past few decades. Indeed, economists Greg Duncan and Richard Murnane calculate that, between 1972 and 2006, high-income parents increased their spending on "enrichment activities" for their children by 151 percent in inflation-adjusted terms, compared to 57 percent for low-income parents.

In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters ATLANTA – Stacey Calvin spends almost as much time commuting to her job — on a bus, two trains and another bus — as she does working part-time at a day care center. She knows exactly where to board the train and which stairwells to use at the stations so that she has the best chance of getting to work on time in the morning and making it home to greet her three children after school. “It’s a science you just have to perfect over time,” said Ms. Rich-Get-Richer Effect Observed in BitCoin Digital Currency Network In January 2009, a small group of Internet enthusiasts began an unusual economic experiment when they began to trade a new type of digital cash known as BitCoin. After a shaky start, the idea caught on and grew rapidly after 2011. Today, bitcoins can buy a wider range of goods and services. In total, the BitCoin marketplace has hosted over 17 million transactions and the value of all the bitcoins in circulation is over $1 billion.

In graphics: Iran, sanctions and the nuclear deal: Iran’s nuclear deal becomes a reality SOMETIME in the next few days Iran’s “Implementation Day” is almost certain to be declared. That is the moment when Iran is deemed to have complied with all its obligations in dismantling those parts of its nuclear programme that would soon have put it weeks away from being able to build a bomb. All nuclear-related sanctions, including the freezing of $100bn of Iranian assets, will be lifted. 40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that. Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new. A few are important to know, some interpret and display data in a beautiful or creative way, and a few may even make you chuckle or shake your head.

Stop Supporting Child Slavery By Avoiding These 6 Companies – Collective Evolution Who doesn’t love chocolate? Americans sure do. In fact, the average American citizen eats over 11 pounds of chocolate each year. The Benefits of Economic Expansions Are Increasingly Going to the Richest Americans Economic expansions are supposed to be the good times, the periods in which incomes and living standards improve. And that’s still true, at least for some of us. But who benefits from rising incomes in an expansion has changed drastically over the last 60 years. Pavlina R. Tcherneva, an economist at Bard College, created a chart that vividly shows how. (The chart appears in print in the Fall 2014 edition of the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, in her article “Reorienting fiscal policy: A bottom-up approach.”)

CEO-to-worker pay gap is obscene; want to know how obscene? Nothing seems to get U.S. corporations' dander up like a threat to the pay and perks of their chief executives. That's one explanation for corporate America's superheated, turbocharged, over-the-top reaction to the CEO pay ratio rule recently proposed by the Securities and Exchange Commission. The rule requires most large public companies to calculate the ratio of the pay of their chief executive officer to the median pay of all their employees. First Persian Gulf War 1980 Iran and Iraq had a long history of territorial and ethnic conflicts. A disputed waterway along their common border had been the focus of a number of conflicts since the 16th century, and in the 20th century, tensions between the two countries built as treaties and pacts were repeatedly made and broken. Tensions increased further in the 1970s as Iran gave shelter and arms to Kurdish rebels fighting against Saddam Hussein’s regime. In 1975, the two countries brokered a deal in the Algiers Agreement in which Iraq made some territorial concessions in exchange for Iran ceasing its support of the Kurdish rebels. Peace was short-lived, however, as the 1979 Iranian Islamic revolution espoused a pan-Islamic religious nationalism, which Hussein perceived as a threat to his notion of a pan-Arab nationalism which was more secular in nature and did not include the ethnic Persians of Iran.

Top 10 Strangest Things In Space Space Let’s be honest: space is an absolutely crazy place. Most science fiction writers throw in a planet with two stars that looks vaguely like Southern California, and call it a day. But the cosmos is a lot stranger than we give it credit for: Everyone knows that shooting stars are just meteors entering the atmosphere, right?

This Map Shows the Most Valuable Brand for Each Country The world’s most valuable brand is owned by a company that you likely interact with every day. In fact, you may have even gotten to this web page using it. That brand is Google – and it dominates the internet with a 64% market share in search, while generating 41% of all digital advertising revenue globally. According to Brand Finance’s most recent 2017 list, Google’s “brand value” has recently increased to $109.5 billion, which is just enough to supplant Apple’s $107.1 billion brand from the top of the list. What is “brand value”?

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