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Crowdsourcing

Crowdsourcing

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crowdsourcing

Related:  Modèles d'organisation

What motivates us at work? More than money “When we think about how people work, the naïve intuition we have is that people are like rats in a maze,” says behavioral economist Dan Ariely (TED Talk: What makes us feel good about our work?) “We really have this incredibly simplistic view of why people work and what the labor market looks like.” Instead, when you look carefully at the way people work, he says, you find out there’s a lot more at play — and at stake — than money. Ariely provides evidence that we are also driven by the meaningfulness of our work, by others’ acknowledgement — and by the amount of effort we’ve put in: the harder the task is, the prouder we are. “When we think about labor, we usually think about motivation and payment as the same thing, but the reality is that we should probably add all kinds of things to it: meaning, creation, challenges, ownership, identity, pride, etc.,” Ariely says.

Crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing is a specific sourcing model in which individuals or organizations use contributions from Internet users to obtain needed services or ideas. Definitions[edit] The term "crowdsourcing" was coined in 2005 by Jeff Howe and Mark Robinson, editors at Wired, to describe how businesses were using the Internet to "outsource work to the crowd",[1] which quickly led to the portmanteau "crowdsourcing." Howe first published a definition for the term crowdsourcing in a companion blog post to his June 2006 Wired article, "The Rise of Crowdsourcing", which came out in print just days later:[11] "Simply defined, crowdsourcing represents the act of a company or institution taking a function once performed by employees and outsourcing it to an undefined (and generally large) network of people in the form of an open call.

Knowledge intensive business services Knowledge Intensive Business Services (commonly known as KIBS) are services and business operations heavily reliant on professional knowledge. They are mainly concerned with providing knowledge-intensive support for the business processes of other organizations. As a result, their employment structures are heavily weighted towards scientists, engineers, and other experts. It is common to distinguish between T-KIBS, (those with high use of scientific and technological knowledge - R&D services, engineering services, computer services, etc.), and P-KIBS, who are more traditional professional services - legal, accountancy, and many management consultancy and marketing services.

Wikinomics Concepts[edit] According to Tapscott, Wikinomics is based on four ideas: Openness, Peering, Sharing, and Acting Globally. The use of mass collaboration in a business environment, in recent history, can be seen as an extension of the trend in business to outsource: externalize formerly internal business functions to other business entities. The difference however is that instead of an organized business body brought into being specifically for a unique function, mass collaboration relies on free individual agents to come together and cooperate to improve a given operation or solve a problem. This kind of outsourcing is also referred to as crowdsourcing, to reflect this difference. This can be incentivized by a reward system, though it is not required.

- things i have seen A new housing project by Primus Architects is situated by the coast of the north of Zealand, Denmark. The plot is a partitioning of a larger plot belonging to an old thatched house and is partly enclosed by trees. The two buildings, inhabited by two generations, share the garden, and in the layout of the site plan attention has been given to providing both separate and common spaces. Sweden is shifting to a 6-hour work day Despite research telling us it’s a really bad idea, many of us end up working 50-hour weeks or more because we think we’ll get more done and reap the benefits later. And according to a study published last month involving 600,000 people, those of us who clock up a 55-hour week will have a 33 percent greater risk of having a stroke than those who maintain a 35- to 40-hour week. With this in mind, Sweden is moving towards a standard 6-hour work day, with businesses across the country having already implemented the change, and a retirement home embarking on a year-long experiment to compare the costs and benefits of a shorter working day. "I think the 8-hour work day is not as effective as one would think. To stay focused on a specific work task for 8 hours is a huge challenge.

Wired 14.06: Look Who's Crowdsourcing By Jeff HowePage 1 of 1 The crowd is ready to work. So who’s hiring? Companies in a wide array of industries are devising ways to harness the intelligence and creativity of distributed labor. User-generated content Many commercial websites rely on UGC. For example,Amazon.com and Trip Advisor rely on users to rate products and hotels and restaurants, respectively.[2][3] These reviews are important part of what the two respective websites offer. When UGC is contained in commercial websites it is often monitored by administrators to avoid offensive content or language, copyright infringement issues, or simply to determine relevancy of the content to the site's theme. Because user-generated content is generally free to store, the world's data centers are now replete with exabytes of UGC that, in addition to creating a corporate asset,[4] may also contain data that can be regarded as a liability.[5][6] General requirements[edit]

Management 2.0 : Manage jan 28th, 2010 by Anthony Poncier This first one is related to a conference on Entreprise 2.0 (part of the General Management and Strategy Program) for an audience at HEC Executive Education (HEC is ranked first business school in Europe by the Financial Times). The objective of this article is to share the conference material. In the first part of the program, there was an intervention on Marketing 2.0, so I made only few slides on the subject, not to be redundant with another speaker. This Heart's On Fire (for people who know almost everything cool already!) Fabian Baron Rugs The more I learn about Fabian Baron, the more I love him. I was at a friend's place last night trying to figure out how to decorate her new LES pad and she showed me some rugs by the French creative wunderkind that still have me drooling. The carpet collection is inspired by Liquid Light, a single-volume monograph assembled from the personal work of Fabien Baron.

Kate Raworth Humanity’s 21st century challenge is to ensure that every person has the resources they need to meet their human rights, while collectively we live within the ecological means of this one planet. The ‘doughnut’ of planetary and social boundaries is a playfully serious approach to framing that challenge. The doughnut of social and planetary boundaries The environmental ceiling consists of nine planetary boundaries, as set out by Rockstrom et al, beyond which lie unacceptable environmental degradation and potential tipping points in Earth systems. The social foundation consists of the eleven top social priorities identified by the world’s governments in the run-up to Rio+20 – and below this foundation of resource use lies unacceptable human deprivation such as hunger, ill-health and income poverty.

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