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The English Language In 30 Accents (Animated)

The English Language In 30 Accents (Animated)
Related:  SpeakingEnglish around the world

Which variety of English should you speak? Ahead of UN English Language Day on 23 April, English language and linguistics specialist Dr Urszula Clark presents research on variations in the use of English and what these could mean for education policy and teachers of English. Her live-streamed British Council seminar is later today from 19:00 to 20:00 BST. You are what you speak: place of origin most important identity factor My research took place in the West Midlands region of the UK and looked at variations in the use of English in creative spoken performance such as comedy, drama and poetry, as well as in written texts such as letters to local newspapers, stories and poems written in dialect. The results suggest that people are increasingly and deliberately using English in a way that identifies them with a particular place. Is there a ‘correct’ variety of English? The research highlights how dynamic, fragmented and mobile the English language has become. Which variety of English should we teach?

Which variety of English should you speak? Ahead of UN English Language Day on 23 April 2014, English language and linguistics specialist Dr Urszula Clark presents research Opens in a new tab or window. on variations in the use of English and what these could mean for education policy and teachers of English. Her live-streamed British Council seminar Opens in a new tab or window. is later today from 19:00 to 20:00 BST. You are what you speak: place of origin most important identity factor My research took place in the West Midlands region of the UK and looked at variations in the use of English in creative spoken performance such as comedy, drama and poetry, as well as in written texts such as letters to local newspapers, stories and poems written in dialect. The results suggest that people are increasingly and deliberately using English in a way that identifies them with a particular place. Is there a ‘correct’ variety of English? The research highlights how dynamic, fragmented and mobile the English language has become.

Culture - How Americanisms are killing the English language So it turns out I can no longer speak English. This was the alarming realisation foisted upon me by Matthew Engel’s witty, cantankerous yet nonetheless persuasive polemic That’s the Way it Crumbles: The American Conquest of English. Because by English, I mean British English. Despite having been born, raised and educated on British shores, it seems my mother tongue has been irreparably corrupted by the linguistic equivalent of the grey squirrel. And I’m not alone. Whether you’re a lover or a loather of phrases like “Can I get a decaf soy latte to go?” Speaking on the wireless in 1935, Alistair Cooke declared that “Every Englishman listening to me now unconsciously uses 30 or 40 Americanisms a day”. As a nation we’ve been both invaded and invader, and our language is all the richer for it But how did this happen and why should we care? The first American words to make it across the pond were largely utilitarian – signifiers for flora and fauna that didn’t exist back in Merrie England.

American English Dialects North American English Dialects, Based on Pronunciation Patterns Small-Scale Dialect Map The small map below is the same as the Full-Scale Dialect Map that follows, but shows the entire width of the map (on most monitors). 24-Aug.-2010 Click on any part of this map to move to the equivalent part of the Full-Scale Dialect Map. Full-Scale Dialect Map Instructions For many of the cities or towns on this map, you can listen to an audio or video sample of speech of a native (more specifically, someone who was raised there, though not necessarily born there, and whose dialect clearly represents that place). The cities and towns with a large dot are those which are larger or more important in each state or province. Use the scroll bars to move around on this map, or, even simpler, start at the tiny map above and click the country (U.S. or Canada) that you want to look at. The entire map is clickable, taking you to the list of samples for that state or province. Help! Map Notes Other Sources 1. 2.

5 of My Favorite English Games for ESL Students I saved the best for last. My students requested this game more often than any other game we ever played. It's based on the old drinking game "Ring of Fire," modified for the classroom. Materials needed:A standard deck of playing cards, a whiteboard, 20-30 small slips of blank paper, and a bowl. The setup:Almost none! Place the bowl in the center of a table and spread the cards out, face down, in a circle around the bowl. The activity:Before you start the game, hand every student two small slips of paper. The students will take turns pulling a card. Here are the actions I assign to cards and the penalties involved: K: Ask anyone. Q: Ask a girl. J: Ask a boy. 10: Ask your teacher! 9: Bunny ears! 8: Words. 7: Pick again. 6: Touch your nose! 5: Answer one question. 4: Ask the person on your left. 3: Ask the person on your right. 2: Answer two questions. A: Free card. Note: This is just an example of a setup I use for intermediate university level classes.

The History of the English Language, Animated By Maria Popova The history of language, that peculiar human faculty that Darwin believed was half art and half instinct, is intricately intertwined with the evolution of our species, our capacity for invention, our understanding of human biology, and even the progress of our gender politics. From the fine folks at Open University — who previously gave us these delightful 60-second animated syntheses of the world’s major religions, philosophy’s greatest thought experiments, and the major creative movements in design — comes this infinitely entertaining and illuminating animated history of the English language in 10 minutes: Complement with these 5 essential reads on language and the only surviving recording of Virginia Woolf’s voice, in which she explores the beauty of the English language.

IDEA International Dialects of English Archive | free dialect and accent recordings for the performing arts IDEA International Dialects of English Archive Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom If this is your first time here, then read the Teacher's Guide to Using These PagesIf you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Home | Articles | Lessons | Techniques | Questions | Games | Jokes | Things for Teachers | Links | Activities for ESL Students Would you like to help? If you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Copyright © 1997-2010 by The Internet TESL Journal Pages from this site should not be put online elsewhere.Permission is not required to link directly to any page on our site as long as you do not trap the page inside a frame.

Weird facts about the English language. English surprises us all the time with some of the coolest and strangest features that it manifests. It has been the largest language to have been thoroughly studied, revealing more about the peculiarities of this language. I came to you today with some of the strangest facts that research has revealed about English. Aside from being a language where one drives in parkway and parks in a driveway, recites in a play and plays in a recital, here are some other facts about English: You may find this odd or unbelievably ridiculous but it isn't the language of the motto of the British Crown either, it is French: "[Mon] Dieu et mon Droit".... 2. You might have heard of this before, but if you haven't, it's your lucky day. If you look carefully at the numbers, a pattern immediately emerges. Neat, huh! 3. Here is a cool demonstration that shows what I'm talking about. 1. The meaning changes completely based on the word you stress. 4. 5. 6. With this last fact I conclude my article.

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