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BOINC

BOINC
News BOINC Pentathlon announced SETI.Germany invites all BOINC teams to the 5th BOINC Pentathlon, a competition inspired by the Pentathlon in ancient Greece. Teams will compete between May 5 and May 19 at five different BOINC projects to determine the overall winner. 17 Apr 2014, 22:47:19 UTC · Comment Power to Give story in The Daily Californian The UC Berkeley newspaper featured a story on Power to Give, the HTC/BOINC partnership to promote scientific computing on smartphones. 15 Apr 2014, 23:17:20 UTC · Comment New BOINC server VM image available A BOINC server VM image, based on Debian 7 and the latest BOINC code, is available. Thanks to Christian Beer and the University of Halle. 14 Apr 2014, 19:58:30 UTC · Comment

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Related:  BlockChaincomputing

Privacy on the Blockchain Blockchains are a powerful technology, as regular readers of the blog already likely agree. They allow for a large number of interactions to be codified and carried out in a way that greatly increases reliability, removes business and political risks associated with the process being managed by a central entity, and reduces the need for trust. They create a platform on which applications from different companies and even of different types can run together, allowing for extremely efficient and seamless interaction, and leave an audit trail that anyone can check to make sure that everything is being processed correctly.

Gaming the System: Video Gamers Help Researchers Untangle Protein Folding Problem What if the brainpower used playing video games could be channeled toward something more productive, such as helping scientists solve complex biological problems? A team of biochemists and computer scientists from the University of Washington (U.W.) in Seattle now reports that they have successfully tapped into this human problem-solving potential. Their competitive online game "Foldit," released in 2008, enlists the help of online puzzle-solvers to help crack one of science's most intractable mysteries—how proteins fold into their complex three-dimensional forms. The "puzzles" gamers solve are 3-D representations of partially folded proteins, which players manipulate and reshape to achieve the greatest number of points. The scores are based on biochemical measures of how well the players' final structure matches the way the protein appears in nature.

Math Unicode Entities Return to Math Symbols Page Go to the About the Codes section to see how they are implemented. This Page External Links Volunteer Computing Needs You Register | About Us | Contact Us User Name: Password: Forgot Password Latest Edition Archive 80 Million Tiny Images You have submitted 0 labels. Visual dictionary: Visualization of 53,464 english nouns arranged by meaning. Each tile shows the average color of the images that correspond to each term. Visual dictionary Who should hold the keys to our data? In March 2007, Nick Pearce was running the thinktank the Institute for Public Policy Research. That month, one of his young interns, Amelia Zollner, was killed by a lorry while cycling in London. Amelia was a bright, energetic Cambridge graduate, who worked at University College London. She was waiting at traffic lights when a lorry crushed her against a fence and dragged her under its wheels.

Rosetta@home Fluorescent proteins designed from scratch Congrats to all Rosetta@home volunteers who contributed to a recent report in Nature describing the design of a completely artificial fluorescent beta-barrel protein. As described by one of the main authors, Anastassia, in this forum post: The paper presents many “firsts” in computational protein design. It is the first de novo design of the beta-barrel fold (one of the most described folds in the past 35 years, yet mysterious until now). It is also the first de novo design of a protein tailored to bind a small-molecule, which requires very high accuracy in the placement of side chains on protein backbones assembled from scratch. How to Report Bugs Effectively There are a number of ways in which non-programmers can contribute to software projects; documentation and testing are among the most frequently-requested services, but testing that results in useless bug reports accomplishes nothing but frustrating the programmer. Today, Simon Tatham shares what it's like to be on the receiving end of bug reports, and offers suggestions for how you can help resolve problems as quickly as possible. Introduction Anybody who has written software for public use will probably have received at least one bad bug report. Reports that say nothing ("It doesn't work!")

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