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Plagiarism.org - Best Practices for Ensuring Originality in Written Work

Plagiarism.org - Best Practices for Ensuring Originality in Written Work

http://www.plagiarism.org/

Related:  plagiarismStudy skillsethical use in the 21st centuryILDigital Citizenship

Put an End to Plagiarism in Your Classroom According to a report by Plagiarism.org, "Studies indicate that approximately 30 percent of all students may be plagiarizing on every written assignment they complete." Kids plagiarize for a variety of reasons. Some kids are lazy, some are unmotivated, some are disorganized, and some just don't understand what plagiarism really is. Whatever the reasons, a few simple steps can help you put an end to plagiarism in your classroom. Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to read and evaluate its level of accuracy, reliability and bias. When we recently assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, the results definitely got our attention.

Remix, Reuse, Recombine: Holding a Seminar on Mash-Up Culture Overview | How are the dynamics of the Web affecting how we read, think and create? What is a “mash-up,” and what does this trend mean for our culture? In this lesson, students reflect on the cultural changes being forged by digital media and prepare and participate in a Socratic seminar on the issues. They then create their own mash-ups and reflect upon what is lost and gained through “recombinant” or appropriation art. How To Make Students Better Online Researchers I recently came across an article in Wired Magazine called “ Why Kids Can’t Search “. I’m always interested in this particular topic, because it’s something I struggle with in my middle and high school classes constantly, and I know I’m not alone in my frustrations. Getting kids to really focus on what exactly they are searching for, and then be able to further distill idea into a few key specific search terms is a skill that we must teach students, and we have to do it over and over again. We never question the vital importance of teaching literacy, but we have to be mindful that there are many kinds of “literacies”. An ever more important one that ALL teachers need to be aware of is digital literacy. I could go off in many directions on this, but for the purpose of this post I’m focusing strictly on the digital literacy of searching.

Copyright Flowchart: Can I Use It? Yes? No? If This… Then… It is the responsibility of all educators to model good digital citizenship for their students. Especially when it comes to copyright, plagiarism and intellectual property. The waters are murky. Education World ® - Student Guide to Avoiding Plagiarism Plagiarism is presenting someone else's words or ideas as your own. The following are all examples of plagiarism: Quoting or paraphrasing material without citing the source of that material. Sources can include Web sites, magazines, newspapers, textbooks, journals, TV and radio programs, movies and videos, photographs and drawings, charts and graphs; any information or ideas that are not your own. Quoting a source without using quotation marks -- even if you do cite it.

Resources and Downloads for Teaching Critical Thinking Tips for downloading: PDF files can be viewed on a wide variety of platforms -- both as a browser plug-in or a stand-alone application -- with Adobe's free Acrobat Reader program. Click here to download the latest version of Adobe Reader. Click on any title link below to view or download that file. A Way With Words Note: This lesson was originally published on an older version of The Learning Network; the link to the related Times article will take you to a page on the old site. Overview of Lesson Plan: In this lesson, students will examine the case of a particular author accused of stealing another author’s work. They then create plagiarized pieces of work and reflect on the writing process. Author(s): Michelle Sale, The New York Times Learning Network Javaid Khan, The Bank Street College of Education in New York City

Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. Responsible Search Strategies for Kids The Internet has given kids unprecedented access to information and entertainment. All they need to do is search for something, and it arrives -- often unfiltered, age-inappropriate, or totally irrelevent. You can keep them in a safe zone using kid-safe browsers and search sites and reference and research tools.

Exploring Plagiarism, Copyright, and Paraphrasing ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Genres in Academic Writing: Reflective writing The purpose of reflective writing is to help you learn from a particular practical experience. It will help you to make connections between what you are taught in theory and what you need to do in practice. You reflect so that you can learn. In reflective writing, you are trying to write down some of the thinking that you have been through while carrying out a particular practical activity, such as writing an essay, teaching a class or selling a product. Through reflection, you should be able to make sense of what you did and why and perhaps help yourself to do it better next time. You might reflect for many reasons in many ways, for example, in a diary or personal log.

Topics of the Times Note: This lesson was originally published on an older version of The Learning Network; the link to the related Times article will take you to a page on the old site. Overview of Lesson Plan: In this lesson, students will compare and contrast Times Topics pages with Wikipedia as potential sources of information and use Times Topics pages to tackle classroom research questions. ( Click here for a companion lesson for Grades 3-5.) Authors: Amanda Christy Brown, The Learning Network Kristin McGinn Mahoney, The Learning Network

Related:  Ethical use in the 21st Century