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Wind Map

Wind Map
An invisible, ancient source of energy surrounds us—energy that powered the first explorations of the world, and that may be a key to the future. This map shows you the delicate tracery of wind flowing over the US. The wind map is a personal art project, not associated with any company. We've done our best to make this as accurate as possible, but can't make any guarantees about the correctness of the data or our software. Please do not use the map or its data to fly a plane, sail a boat, or fight wildfires :-) If the map is missing or seems slow, we recommend the latest Chrome browser. Surface wind data comes from the National Digital Forecast Database. If you're looking for a weather map, or just want more detail on the weather today, see these more traditional maps of temperature and wind.

http://hint.fm/wind/

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Debunking the student loans crisis - Mar. 30 State cutbacks to higher education are forcing some people to take out more student loans. NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Total student loan debt has topped $1 trillion ... but there's no need to panic. Most borrowers have a reasonable amount of debt, and the total balance is not likely to cause major damage to the economy like the mortgage crisis did, experts say. "I don't think it's a bubble," said Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of Finaid.org, a financial aid website.

World Map Signatory States (183) Ratifying States (162) Non-Signatory States (13) San Francisco Crimespotting Notice anything different?We’ve been working on the interface design, read more about it on the blog. San Francisco Crimespotting is an interactive map of crimes in San Francisco and a tool for understanding crime in cities. If you hear sirens in your neighborhood, you should know why. Crimespotting makes this possible with interactive maps and RSS feeds of crimes in areas that you care about. We’ve found ourselves frustrated by the proprietary systems and long disclaimers that ultimately limit information available to the public. Listen to an Earthquake’s Eerie ‘Whale Songs’ Is it possible to “hear” an earthquake? Not the rumbling of the ground that results, but the earthquake itself. Even if you could, what’s the point of listening? About a dozen years ago, geophysicist Ben Holtzman and musician/sound designer Jason Candler set out to answer these questions, with a side goal of sharing their passion for earthquakes with the public. From the fruits of their research, the SeismoDome show was born. Holtzman and Candler co-produce the show—with Holtzman writing scientific content, creating sounds from seismic data, and working with collaborators to produce the visual elements, while Candler handles the sound engineering and design and helps with the writing and conception of the show.

The Visible Universe, Then and Now Before the telescope was invented in 1608, our picture of the universe consisted of six planets, our moon, the sun and any stars we could see in the Milky Way galaxy. But as our light-gathering capabilities have grown, so too have the boundaries of the visible universe. Our interactive map shows how the known universe has grown from 1950 to 2011. In the late 1700s, William Herschel, an English astronomer using a telescope with an 18.7-inch aperture, made the first systematic surveys of the skies, revealing more than 2,000 distant galaxies, nebulae and other objects invisible to the naked eye. Since then, increasingly powerful optical and radio telescopes have greatly expanded our store of knowledge. Hiroshima, U.S.A. Collier's magazine cover from 1950 depicting a mushroom cloud over Manhattan (Chesley Bonestell) There’s no city that Americans fictionally destroy more often than New York. New York has been blown up, beaten down and attacked in every medium imaginable throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.

Medical Geography and Disease Surveillance A Survey has been developed by myself to document and compare GIS utilization in the workplace. This is intended only for sharing at this blogsite (and Medical GIS conferences) –no gimmicks, no advertising. Survey Monkey is used, which is a secured survey site that gathers no private information. Why the survey? There must be others like me trying to deal with the frustrations experienced due the slow progress made when it comes to incorporating high level GIS skills into the workplace. This survey assesses GIS availability and utilization in both academic and non-academic work settings.

Mapping Every Single Job in the United States One of the best visualizations of race in America might be called pointillist. By mapping one dot for every Census-registered human in the country, color-coded for race, a team at the University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center of Public Service rendered abstract social data painfully personal. Robert Manduca, a Harvard PhD student in sociology and a mapmaker, has brought the power of the dot to a new dataset: Jobs.

Cell Size and Scale Some cells are visible to the unaided eye The smallest objects that the unaided human eye can see are about 0.1 mm long. That means that under the right conditions, you might be able to see an ameoba proteus, a human egg, and a paramecium without using magnification. A magnifying glass can help you to see them more clearly, but they will still look tiny. Smaller cells are easily visible under a light microscope. New project: Canvi & temps Canvi & temps are two network browsing spaces built from a compilation of articles, pages, persons and links, all related with complexity in science. The research was carried out by Pau Alsina, Josep Perelló, Michele Catanzaro, Pere Monràs, Carles Tardío, Oriol Vallès, Irma Vilà and Santiago Ortiz. The project is in display at Arts Santa Mónica, in the context of a Cultures of Change exhibit. This historical (it includes citations since 1927) and transversal (it contains more than 30 categories of fields of knowledge) research offers and ample vision of the collection of aproaches, strategies and tactics, reseach methods and interests known as complexity science. Canvi & Temps offer two different ways of experiencing the contents of the network and its interrelations.

5 Counter-Intuitive Productivity Tips Since I decided to become an expert on productivity and time management and started studying these topics, I’ve run into many examples of counter-intuitive advice that actually works. I find it fascinating that whenever you want to really understand something – anything – you will discover that the real truth behind it is usually counter-intuitive. So, here are 5 very useful productivity tips that you can immediately use.

Map: Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks This interactive map visually plots global outbreaks of measles, mumps, whooping cough, polio, rubella, and other diseases that are easily preventable by inexpensive and effective vaccines. Red triangles indicate attacks on vaccinators and healthcare workers, as well as announcements from both governments and non-state actors that have had an impact—either positive or negative—on the successful implementation of vaccination programs. The Global Health Program at the Council on Foreign Relations has been tracking reports by news media, governments, and the global health community on these outbreaks since the fall of 2008. This project aims to promote awareness of a global health problem that is easily preventable, and examine the factors that threaten the success of eradicating preventable illnesses such as polio. Learn more about Global Health. On to the Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks map

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