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Blog Archive » The Web’s third frontier

Blog Archive » The Web’s third frontier
Everyone realizes that the web is entering a new phase in its development. One indication of this transition is the proliferation of attempts to explain the changes that are occurring. Functional explanations emphasize the real time web, collaborative systems and location-based services. Technical explanations argue that the interconnectivity of data is the most significant current development. They consider the web’s new frontiers to be closely related to the semantic web or the “web of things”. Although these explanations are both pertinent and intriguing, none of them offers an analytical matrix for assessing the developments that are now underway. In contrast, other explanations are far too broad to serve any useful purpose. How can the web’s development be understood? The web represents a compendium of technical resources, functionalities and usage practices, and it cannot be reduced to just one of these dimensions. The founding principles The two initial phases of growth

http://www.cratyle.net/en/2010/03/11/the-webs-third-frontier/

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Education Technology - theory and practice: Pearltrees for teachers Year 2012 last post is a guest post from Finnish teacher Tommi Viljakainen. He is a teacher in Elimäki lower and upper secondary school. He teaches English, French and P.E. He is also interested in social media, iPad and the future of education. You can find Tommi also in Twitter under name @tommiviljaA (Finnish) teacher's dive into social media - "I discovered pearls in Pearltrees!"Tips for teachersThis time I thought I could write about Pearltrees from a teacher's perspective.

Curation Nation: How to Win in a World Where Consumers are Creators. By Steven Rosenbaum. McGraw-Hill. Read reviews on Amazon Curation Nation: How to Win in a World Where Consumers are Creators by Steven Rosenbaum New York: McGraw-Hill, 2011 Pearltrees releases a new version, without any pearls nor trees The Paris-based startup founded in 2009 once declared: “We focus on the visual potential of Pearltrees to let people dive deeply into their interests and nearly feel them”. Their product, offering a digital curation tool, was unique because of the visual interface voluntareely original: links and folders symbolized by rounded pearls attached together like the branches of a tree. Today, pearls and trees have disappeared to make room for a brand new and larger organisation tool.

Participation inequality In social sciences, participation inequality consists of difference between levels of participation of various groups in certain activities. Common examples include: In politics, participation inequality typically affects "the kinds of individuals, such as the young, the poor and those with little formal education"[2] who tend to not take the initiative to participate in electoral and related events. State enumeration, such as was done in Canada before the implementation of the National Register of Electors in 1996, "worked to augment voter turnout among all segments of society and thus mitigated a natural tendency toward participation inequality in electoral politics".[2] See also[edit] References[edit]

Pearltrees Raises $6.7M For Its “Collaborative Interest Graph” Pearltrees, a company offering a novel interface for sharing and finding content, has raised 5 million euros ($6.7 million US) in new funding. The basic unit of the Pearltrees service is the pearl, which is basically a bookmark. Users can assemble these pearls into trees based around a topic. 7 Secrets of the Super Organized A few years ago, my life was a mess. So was my house, my desk, my mind. Then I learned, one by one, a few habits that got me completely organized. Am I perfect?

Pearltrees launches Android app, makes leap into file management Android users looking for a novel way to organize your information, look no further. Pearltrees announced that its app is finally launching to Android phones, and the platform is adding some Android-like functionality. From the get-go Pearltrees will support 2,500 Android devices and 98.3 percent of Android operating systems, which is commendable considering the varying assortment of screen sizes and should-be-retired Android OS’ that are still in use out there.

Pearltrees 2.0 Launches with a Brand New User Interface Today Pearltrees officially separated itself from its unique visual interface made of pearls and pearltrees, finally succumbing to the trend of Pinterest-like user experience. It might be more practical for the majority of users to sort and collect content with the new Pearltrees 2.0, however, some people might regret the innovative former interface that allowed to discover related content rapidly by browsing an “ocean” of Pearls. Users still have the possibility to go back to the “pearly” version accessible from the menu in the settings section. Now the Pearltree has been replaced by the “Collection” which is basically a “folder” (or a board) containing various types of content of a topic, for instance, you can collect web pages, images, and notes, just like you can do with Evernote and Pinterest.

1% rule (Internet culture) Pie chart showing the proportion of lurkers, contributors and creators under the 90–9–1 principle In Internet culture, the 1% rule is a rule of thumb pertaining to participation in an internet community, stating that only 1% of the users of a website actively create new content, while the other 99% of the participants only lurk. A variant is the "90–9–1 principle" (sometimes also presented as the 89:10:1 ratio),[1] which states that in a collaborative website such as a wiki, 90% of the participants of a community only view content, 9% of the participants edit content, and 1% of the participants actively create new content. Both can be compared with the similar rules known to information science, such as the 80/20 rule known as the Pareto principle, that 20 percent of a group will produce 80 percent of the activity, however the activity may be defined.

Pearltrees: Slick Social Bookmarking and Curation Tool Now on iPad WHAT: A web-based and iPad application to organize and curate your social life online. Users collect, or bookmark, web pages, tweets, Google+ posts and more, and arrange them in pearls or pearltrees. A pearl holds anything interesting you find on the web with a URL. A pearltree is a collection of webpages that functions like a folder. On the iPad, you simply organize your pearls by touching and dragging. Rumsey Historical Map Collection The David Rumsey Map Collection was started over 25 years ago and contains more than 150,000 maps. The collection focuses on rare 18th and 19th century maps of North and South America, although it also has maps of the World, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Oceania. The collection includes atlases, wall maps, globes, school geographies, pocket maps, books of exploration, maritime charts, and a variety of cartographic materials including pocket, wall, children's, and manuscript maps. Items range in date from about 1700 to 1950s. Digitization of the collection began in 1996 and there are now over 55,000 items online, with new additions added regularly.

When is the social curation bubble going to burst? You just can’t move for social curation services right now. The biggest noise might be coming from Pinterest, which is growing like a weed — but whether it’s the new-look Delicious, Switzerland’s Paperli, shopping curation site Svpply, image service Mlkshk or another site, the fact is that almost everybody seems to want to help you save and sort and share the things you find on the web right now. With this swirl of activity, then, it’s no surprise to hear that Parisian service Pearltrees — slogan “collect, organize, discover” — has just raised another $6 million of funding, led by local conglomerate Groupe Accueil. The company, which has been running in public since 2009, welcomed the injection of funds as a way to help expand and scale up its system for bookmarking and organizing, which is based around a clustered visual interface. And it needs that scale. Right now Pearltrees is small and has moderate momentum, building up 350,000 users in the past three years.

Pearltrees: Visual Collaborative Content Curation for Android Pearltrees is a powerful application that allows people to browse and organize web content visually. This “crowed sourced library”, started on the desktop web in 2009, became mobile in 2011 with the launch of the iPad application soon followed by the iPhone version in 2012. Pearltrees counts now over 2 million monthly active users who have collected 50 million pearls, the iPad and iPhone apps are consistently rated 5 stars and have been downloaded more than a million times. Today, Android users will be able to access Pearltrees from the Google Play store, the application is free and there are currently three discounted Premium versions that offer privacy settings with 1 GB storage for $1.99 per month, with high priority support and 3 GB storage for $3.99 per month.The high-end version, currently priced at $9.99, in addition to the privacy control and high priority support, offers 10 GB storage, customization features, backup and encryption.

Lurker In Internet culture, a lurker is typically a member of an online community who observes, but does not actively participate.[1][2] The exact definition depends on context. Lurkers make up a large proportion of all users in online communities.[3] Lurking allows users to learn the conventions of an online community before they actively participate, improving their socialization when they eventually de-lurk.[4] However, a lack of social contact while lurking sometimes causes loneliness or apathy among lurkers.[5] Lurkers are referred to using many names, including browsers, read-only participants, non-public participants, legitimate peripheral participants, or vicarious learners.[6] History[edit]

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