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MacGyver, Survivalist, or Stockpiler: The Urban Survival Skills Everyone Should Know

MacGyver, Survivalist, or Stockpiler: The Urban Survival Skills Everyone Should Know
It's your word against his.. If he ain't talkin, your word pretty much wins. Also, don't try draggin him back in your house after he's dead.. The cops will be able to tell he was shot inside your house. As soon as you're involved in a shooting like this, call the cops, then a lawyer.. You are so bad ass. Seriously, you're advocating shooting a potential burglar with your "Mossy, Remy or Mr. We're not all in middle school, you know, and life is not like a Die Hard movie. I don't want to kill anyone. I am not running from my house. You can be a moral coward and subject yourself to the will of a criminal, however I will suffer no such victimization. @jodark It's not cowardly to leave and certainly not morally cowardly to leave if there is an intruder in your house. Unless you were a soldier or a police officer, you have probably not faced a life or death situation, and frankly, you are likely not equipped to fight back adequately.

http://lifehacker.com/5889600/macgyver-survivalist-or-stockpiler-the-urban-survival-skills-everyone-needs-to-know

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Survive The Zombie Apocalypse Well here we are—2012. End of the world time. Sucks, doesn’t it? JNC, Barton-Wright, Self Defence with a cane part 1 Journal of Non-lethal Combatives, February 2000 From Pearson’s Magazine, 11 (January 1901), 35-44. Contributed by Ralph Grasso. Build A Warm Shelter Out Of Everyday Materials Article originally posted at www.PreparedForThat.com Shelter is one of the primary needs of all people, secondary only to water and food. Shelter is needed to keep you safe from wind and weather, and also to provide a warm, dry place to rest and recuperate.

Learn the art of natural navigation - travel tips and articles In this excerpt from Lonely Planet Magazine, natural navigation expert Tristan Gooley shows you how to ditch the compass and GPS and find your way using only the signposts that are all around us. These tips are written from a northern hemisphere perspective - many directions can be reversed for the southern hemisphere - eg, when the sun is at its highest in the southern hemisphere sky it's due north. These tips are just for interest. Please navigate responsibly! Sun When the sun is at its highest in the sky, it is due south – in simple terms, the sun is south at lunchtime.

The Poor Man’s Guide To Survival Gear Special Note: Obviously, an entire book could be written on this subject, which is a task beyond the scope of this article. The purpose of the following piece is to give those with financial difficulty a foothold on prepping without added pain. It is meant to be a starting point, not a compendium. A friend of mine took note recently that a large portion of activists involved in the Liberty Movement had hit extremely hard times, or had been struggling financially even before the general economic collapse began to take hold.

Make an Emergency "Get Home Bag" to Keep at Work Laugh if you want, but we had a case in 2005 where 3/4" of snow fell, and it took me 4 hrs to drive 12 miles. The local school system closed schools without telling DOT first, and so the roads were full of parents before the salt trucks could get out on the roads. As a result, you had cars slip sliding away, and no one knew how to drive in the ICE that occurred, as the melted snow immediately refroze on the roads that were well below freezing. After I gave up on the main roads, I ended up doing a U-turn and went back roads - but it could have been worse. The car behind me was a bright yellow school bus, full of kids. At 8:30 at night.

Crovel: If You Only Get One Tool to Fend Off a Zombie Invasion May 3rd, 2011 by Shane McGlaun The Crovel is an awesome looking survival tool and I really want one even though I have no need for a short spade to dig with. This thing may well be the tool best suited for a life on the run from zombie hoards ever invented. 14 Basic Things To Have In Your Car In Winter Part 1 Growing up near the Cleveland snow belt on Lake Erie has its advantages. Starting with the first snowfall of the year, the local weather people constantly remind you what emergency items to carry in your car for winter in case you got stuck in the snow (or more likely, get stuck in the mud after the snow melts.) Prompted by the latest snow storm and my car accident last week, I’m spreading the word on what to have your car during winter snow emergencies. You probably already have most of the items on the list. The basic items don’t cost a ton of money and are things you can use year round.

How to Forecast Weather Ever wondered how to forecast the weather without actually using instruments? Check the Clouds: Clouds can tell us a lot about the weather. For example, they can tell us if it’s going to be warmer on a particular night by simply being there. Useful YouTube Vids This page is designated be an index to all of the other useful video pages on this site that are filled with great YouTube Videos that I have reviewed and found to be highly useful and related to the topics of this site. Wilderness Survival Videos Wilderness Survival Videos – Page 1 Wilderness Survival Videos – Page 2 Wilderness Survival Videos – Page 3 Bushcraft Videos

What to Put in a Doomsday (or Disaster) Survival Kit While 2012 is an excuse, there's nothing wrong with being prepared. Just look at Katrina, and the devastation it wrought. My personal wake up call was in 1999 when our city got hit with an October heavy wet snow that basically rendered the entire city without power, sub freezing temps, and obviously no grocery stores open. Everything was liveable after about 72 hours when power was somewhat restored to areas, but our house was without heat for a week. If we had not have had a wood stove and a source of fire, we likely would have been in very bad shape. So now, in my pocket, I always carry:

Extreme Minimalism, A Minimalist Project of Travel and Discovey I’ve drawn an unusual amount of attention to my minimalism project this week. First, Dan Patterson of ABC Radio News interviewed me about my 15 things. Dan is one of those amazing interviewers that you wish you were just watching instead of getting interviewed by. Each question was eloquent and succinct. How to Survive Falling Through Ice: An Illustrated Guide If you live in a place where snowy and icy winters are the norm, you know the dangers of falling through the ice. And this guide is especially pertinent for those areas of the country where freezing weather only visits sporadically. When frigid temps descend for a short time upon a location that’s not used to seeing them, people, especially children, are apt to go out exploring their neighborhood ponds and reservoirs. As you can imagine, this creates a danger because the cold weather hasn’t been around long enough to create ice strong enough to walk on.

Vanishing Point: How to disappear in America without a trace Where there's water, life is possible. True, it may be very difficult and very hard to live, depending, but anyone who's driven, hiked, or camped in the American South West will have noticed that cities and ranches crop up where there's surface water or where there's been a well dug. Within the state of California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, and Colorado, there are deserts, mesas, mountains, and forests where normally people never or rarely visit; not-so-secret places where there's water, access to a road within a day's hike, and where a fairly rugged individual may hide while remaining basically healthy, marginally well fed, and reasonably sane.

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