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How the Flipped Classroom Is Radically Transforming Learning

How the Flipped Classroom Is Radically Transforming Learning
Editor's Note:Posts about the flipped class on The Daily Riff beginning in January 2011 have generated over 240,000 views to-date - thanks contributors and readers . . . See our other links related to the flipped class below this guest post. Since this post was written, Bergmann and Sams have released their book, Flip your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. Do check it out. - C.J. Westerberg How the Flipped Classroom was Born by Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams In 2004, we both started teaching at Woodland Park High School in Woodland Park, Colorado. "And how the Flipped Classroom changes the way teachers talk with parents And then one day our world changed. Flipping Increases Student Interaction One of the greatest benefits of flipping is that overall interaction increases: Teacher to student and student to student. Some might ask how we developed a culture of learning. There are a myriad of reasons why a student is not learning well. Are you Ready to Flip?

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Flip this lesson! A new way to teach with video from TED-Ed Announcing a new way to use video to create customized lessons: the “Flip This Lesson” feature from TED-Ed, now in beta at ed.ted.com. With this feature, educators can use, tweak, or completely redo any video lesson featured on TED-Ed, or create lessons from scratch based on a TEDTalk or any video from YouTube. How? Just plug the video in and start writing questions, comments, even quizzes — then save the lesson as a private link and share with your students.

Flipping the Classroom 4/27/2012 By: Teachers from around the world have adopted the flipped classroom model and are using it to teach a variety of courses to students of all ages. In the excerpt below from the book, Flip Your Classroom (©2012, ISTE® International Society for Technology in Education and ASCD), authors Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams outline reasons why educators should consider this model. Flipping speaks the language of today’s students.

Flipping over the Flipped Classroom? So the new rage in education has a label- The Flipped Classroom! There is a movement that believes that it is the perfect mix use of technology that has and will continue to transform the education of America’s students. The flipped classroom is based upon the use of technology to help deliver lessons outside of the classroom (the lesson is watched at home for homework), thus allowing students to spend class time fully focused on subject matter and the expanse of it.

Learning Platform - itslearning Elisabeth Engum records herself explaining a maths concept for her students and posts the video on itslearning. She asks her students to watch the video at home in the evening, and in class the next day the students complete exercises related to the video. They work together or individually while Elisabeth moves between students helping them solve the equations. Flipping the traditional classroom This is the flipped classroom in action. In the traditional classroom, the teacher is restricted to teaching students from the front of the classroom on the whiteboard.

Bloom et al.'s Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain Citation: Huitt, W. (2011). Bloom et al.' Project-Based Learning Activity A Project-Based Learning Activity About Project-Based Learning What Is Project-Based Learning? Students engaged in project-based learning (PBL) activities "work in groups to solve challenging problems that are authentic, curriculum-based, and often interdisciplinary" (McGrath, 2003). Project-based learning is a component of an inquiry-based approach to learning. The flipped classroom Flip or reverse teaching is an instructional approach that uses the power of technologies to support focused and extended student learning. In the approach developed by American teacher, Karl Fish, teachers 'teach' at night and students do 'homework' during the day.1 In the evening, flip teaching involves students in reading, watching, pausing and replaying video tutorials prepared by the teacher to develop a basic understanding of key learning concepts. They then come to class where they can consolidate, apply and extend their new learning through group discussion, problem solving or experimenting with the concepts they have been introduced to. Essentially, what was traditionally completed at home as homework has been flipped to become the focus of classroom learning. Using this strategy allows classroom instructional time to be focused and targeted to students' needs and prior knowledge.

~synthesis~: inversions There was an article in the NY Times recently about a research study that found that students who study online outperform those that study in the classroom. But according to an email Prof. Kathy Gill at U Washington sent to a listserv, the causative factor was not on/off line, but time on task So it wasn't the medium, it wasn't the message, it was the participation level that made the difference. Finding the right resource to support flipped classrooms in the UK What if traditional methods of classroom teaching and ‘homework’ were switched? Teaching professionals have constantly looked at improving ways of raising learner engagement and attainment. While some have fared better than others, it is technology that has offered the greatest scope for innovation, helping the teacher to spend more time supporting students directly rather than instructing them from the front of the class. Flipped or reversed teaching is not a new concept; it dates back to the early nineties where it was trialled in a study on Peer Instruction at Harvard University. The basis of Professor Eric Mazur’s study was to integrate computer software into the classroom in order to allow the teacher to act as a coach rather than a lecturer. Today, the purpose of flipped learning has not changed.

Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Domains Bloom's Taxonomy was created in 1956 under the leadership of educational psychologist Dr Benjamin Bloom in order to promote higher forms of thinking in education, such as analyzing and evaluating concepts, processes, procedures, and principles, rather than just remembering facts (rote learning). It is most often used when designing educational, training, and learning processes. The Three Domains of Learning The committee identified three domains of educational activities or learning (Bloom, et al. 1956): Cognitive: mental skills (knowledge) Affective: growth in feelings or emotional areas (attitude or self) Psychomotor: manual or physical skills (skills)

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