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How the Flipped Classroom Is Radically Transforming Learning

How the Flipped Classroom Is Radically Transforming Learning
Editor's Note:Posts about the flipped class on The Daily Riff beginning in January 2011 have generated over 240,000 views to-date - thanks contributors and readers . . . See our other links related to the flipped class below this guest post. Since this post was written, Bergmann and Sams have released their book, Flip your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. Do check it out. - C.J. Westerberg How the Flipped Classroom was Born by Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams In 2004, we both started teaching at Woodland Park High School in Woodland Park, Colorado. "And how the Flipped Classroom changes the way teachers talk with parents And then one day our world changed. Flipping Increases Student Interaction One of the greatest benefits of flipping is that overall interaction increases: Teacher to student and student to student. Some might ask how we developed a culture of learning. There are a myriad of reasons why a student is not learning well. Are you Ready to Flip?

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Isaac Asimov on the Thrill of Lifelong Learning, Science vs. Religion, and the Role of Science Fiction in Advancing Society by Maria Popova “It’s insulting to imply that only a system of rewards and punishments can keep you a decent human being.” Isaac Asimov was an extraordinary mind and spirit — the author of more than 400 science and science fiction books and a tireless advocate of space exploration, he also took great joy in the humanities (and once annotated Lord Byron’s epic poem “Don Juan”), championed humanism over religion, and celebrated the human spirit itself (he even wrote young Carl Sagan fan mail). Are You Ready to Flip? " . . .not all material is suitable to be taught through a video lesson."Are You Ready to Flip?Part 2 of 3 of "The Flipped Class" by Dan Spencer, Deb Wolf and Aaron Sams

8 Observations on flipping the classroom One of the more unfortunate buzzwords to appear in online education circles and the press is “flipping the classroom”. This means that instead of lecturing students in lessons in school, the teacher records the lecture as a video and uploads it to YouTube – or recommends other people’s videos to the students. The students watch the videos for homework, freeing up the lesson for interactivity, project work and so on. Would you REALLY want to watch this every night?!I not impressed with this brilliant “new” idea. Why not? Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped-classroom model, or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. It is a great first step in reframing the role of the teacher in the classroom. It fosters the "guide on the side" mentality and role, rather than that of the "sage of the stage."

Awesome Chart Comparing Traditional Versus 21st Century Learning February 4, 2015 In his classic book “Education and Experience” John Dewey talks about the dichotomy between traditional and progressive forms of education saying that such a dichotomy polarizes discussions around educational matters. Dewey, instead, argued for an experience-based model that builds on the drawbacks and strengths of both models to form a holistic conceptualization of what a student-centred education should be like. Today, as I stumbled upon this beautiful chart on Mindhsift’s Facebook page I could not help but connect it to Dewey’s discussion of experiential and progressive learning. What in the chart is labelled 21st century learner is in fact the kind of learner Dewey theorized in his work more than half a century ago.

The Flipped Class Revealed Editor's Note: This is Part 3 of 3 of The Flipped Class Series at The Daily Riff. You can start here, by reading this post, and go backwards and still understand what's going on in the conversation. Links to Part 1, "The Flipped Class: What it Is and What it is Not," and Part 2 - "Are You Ready to Flip? Debating the 'Flipped Classroom' at Stanford - Wired Campus Stanford University got lots of attention for inviting the public to participate in a series of free online computer-science classes. One thing that’s drawn less notice is how some of the technologies that help facilitate those mega-classes are changing the experience for Stanford students learning the same subjects. Now a Stanford student is provoking a debate on those innovations, with a blog post critiquing the rigor and format of the “flipped classroom” teaching method deployed in his machine-learning course.

Flipped Classrooms — Tennessee Teaching and Learning Center by guest writer Karen Brinkley If asked to describe a traditional college classroom and style of pedagogy, most people would probably think of students who come to a classroom of chairs in rows to listen to a professor deliver a lecture, and who then did textbook readings and assignments at home. Yet those who have experienced a flipped classroom would describe something completely different. Flipping classrooms is a fairly recent and growing trend sweeping through classrooms across the country. And the name is pretty fitting. Learners Should Be Developing Their Own Essential Questions Having essential questions drive curriculum and learning has become core to many educators’ instructional practices. Grant Wiggins, in his work on Understanding By Design, describes an essential question as: A meaning of “essential” involves important questions that recur throughout one’s life. Such questions are broad in scope and timeless by nature. They are perpetually arguable – What is justice? Is art a matter of taste or principles?

Memory Recall/Retrieval - Memory Processes Recall or retrieval of memory refers to the subsequent re-accessing of events or information from the past, which have been previously encoded and stored in the brain. In common parlance, it is known as remembering. During recall, the brain "replays" a pattern of neural activity that was originally generated in response to a particular event, echoing the brain's perception of the real event. In fact, there is no real solid distinction between the act of remembering and the act of thinking. These replays are not quite identical to the original, though - otherwise we would not know the difference between the genuine experience and the memory - but are mixed with an awareness of the current situation.

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