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Turning a classroom upside down

Turning a classroom upside down
Roshan, her AP Calculus teacher at the private Bullis School in Potomac, told students that they would be learning their lessons at home with help from videos and other materials that she had made, and then would do “homework” problems in class. Roshan had “flipped” her class — a trend in teaching and classroom management that has been adopted by thousands of teachers across the country for a variety of different subjects. It is a reimagination of life in a classroom. The philosophy behind the flip is that teachers can spend time working with students who need their help in the classroom — and students can work together to solve problems — rather than sitting home alone with work they might not understand and with nobody to ask for help. Skeptics raise questions about flipped classrooms: How many subjects are really appropriate for this technique? “My AP Calc class was a really anxious environment,” said Roshan. Gutschick said she thinks her teacher has succeeded. Related:  Flipped Classroom and Online Learning

The Curious Case of the Flipped-Bloom's Meme (This is the sequel to 'Anatomy of a (Flipped) Meme') rss / email subscribe / follow Steve Last post I dug up the history of the Flipped Classroom idea. In this thrilling conclusion I look a variant: the "Flipped Bloom's Taxonomy" meme, which isn't even a meme yet, although in the last three weeks it has looked to get enough traction via one very influential blog post. Do a google image search for Bloom's and see what shapes you get: The very first image has been FLIPPED upside down! Never Meant to Be One Way Of course, Bloom's taxonomy was never meant to be linear or sequential. The version I always knew was a pyramid: But as with the general flipped learning meme, if you look you can find plenty of examples dating back years. This looks like a flipped pyramid right here, dating from 2001: And the taxonomy was revised in 2000 by Loren Anderson, who also appears to have turned it upside down, although I can't get a really good reference for this. May 5 - A Conversation with Aaron Sams 17 May - 2

8 Crucial Resources For Flipped Classrooms Have you “flipped” yet? My colleagues have this week; it’s PSSA week in Pennsylvania (PSSAs are standardized tests.). That’s not the flipped I meant, however. I meant, have you flipped your classroom yet? YouTube This might be the most popular tool teachers have used for flipped instruction. You don’t have to establish a class list to allow for student discussion. Other services, such as those that approximate a LMS, require a lot of preparation before a teacher can use it. You can edit the video online (somewhat). Evernote Tutorial as a Cartoon Trim and stabilize Swap audio tracks Change the look of the video (for instance, make it look like a cartoon) Add annotations Add captions Download the new version of the video for offline use It’s easy to share with colleagues, friends, and professional development organizations. I would assume that teachers might want to share their videos with other teachers or use them when they present at professional development conferences. Edmodo Schoology

‘Flip This Lesson’ From TED-Ed Tired of all those interesting and thought-provoking TED Talks? Me neither. But never one to rest on its laurels, TED-Ed is launching a new way to make these talks a bit more, well, perfect for you. Flip This Lesson It’s called ‘Flip This Lesson’ and it’s basically a video editing tool that lets you create lessons from the vast array of TED Talks. With this feature, educators can use, tweak, or completely redo any video lesson featured on TED-Ed, or create lessons from scratch based on a TEDTalk or any video from YouTube. The Killer Feature This new tool is an open platform which means you can use videos from TED, TED-Ed, or even any YouTube video. I can’t wait to see a talk by Sir Ken Robinson spliced together with Keyboard Cat. Read the full press announcement here .

The Flipped Classroom: Explanation & Resources The flipped classroom model, in which traditional teaching methods and the order of a student’s day are basically reversed to make use of resources online and/or outside of class while moving what we know as traditional “homework” into actual classroom time, has been slowly gaining steam around the country since its unofficial inception in 2004, but the recent onslaught of high quality educational resources being released from the likes of Khan Academy, MIT, and others has really kicked the movement into high gear. What is the flipped classroom model? Does it work? Background on the flipped classroom: The Daily Riff: How the flipped classroom was born The Atlantic: Flipped classrooms promote personalization in higher education The Washington Post: The flip: Turning a classroom upside down Articles on the flipped classroom in action: The classroom flip: a rural case Zanesville, OH teachers use technology to flip classrooms Homework stays at school in flipped classrooms Dean’s training resources

The Flipped Class Manifest Photo: Document with Red Line by Dukeii (Editor's Note: The conversation and interest in the flipped class continues . . . From our very first post about this topic in January 2011 to date (3/30/13), The Daily Riff has received 250,000+ views to related posts which are linked below - extending to over 100 countries. "The Flipped Classroom is an intentional shift of content which in turn helps move students back to the center of learning rather than the products of schooling." The Flipped Class Manifest The "Flipped Classroom" is a term that has recently taken root in education. What Does "Flip" Imply? "Flip" is a verb. Secondly, we are flipping the instructional process and using technology to "time-shift" direct instruction where appropriate. For instance, suppose you are teaching a lesson where students at some point will need to use technology to use a linear regression on their data. What Do Classes Look Like? How Does a Flipped Classroom Fit into Instruction? Final Thoughts

Part 1: Flipping The Classroom? … 12 Resources To Keep You On Your Feet Welcome to another post rich in resources. If you have come here looking for links that will guide you to videos and multimedia to use in a Flipped Classroom that is coming in a future post. Perhaps you have tried a little Flip of your own and want to learn more. If you are beginning to investigate what a Flipped Classroom is, with the thought of possibly trying some kind of Flip yourself… then this is also the right place. I have researched and tried to find you the very best resources to get educators in all positions thinking about what a Flipped Classroom” really is”? Many educators are beginning to become aware of the growing teaching method referred to as “Flipping The Classroom”. You see, at first this definition does make a lot of sense, and like so many “best practices” I see great value in the idea. Yes, I am a proponent of incorporating various multimedia and online learning in a blended environment. The Twelve Resources To Better Understand Flipping the Classroom Like this:

How FC Works What happens when the students have more control in the classroom? Flipped classrooms are being tested out around the world and we’ve featured a few examples in case you wanted to see who is flippin’ out. Until now, we didn’t have an in-depth look at the effects of a flipped classroom or answers to the big questions it raises. Thanks to Susan Murphy of Algonquin College (check out her awesome blog suzemuse.com !), we have our answers. She used the flipped classroom model for her First Year Video and Audio Production class which is part of the Interactive Multimedia Developer program. What inspired you to use the flipped classroom model? One of the big challenges I was having in my video production class was teaching the required software (Adobe Premiere Pro). I wasn’t sure if it was going to work – but I had to give it a shot! Have you gotten any feedback (positive or negative) on the video production class? I have had a lot of great feedback on the class.

iPad Curriculum FC: A Full Picture Due to Khan Academy’s popularity, the idea of the flipped classroom has gained press and credibility within education circles. Briefly, the Flipped Classroom as described by Jonathan Martin is: Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved. Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. A compiled resource page of the Flipped Classroom (with videos and links) can be found at The Flipped Classroom Model Summary

Wordplay - Spanish Vocabulary Game FC: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. See Part 2 and 3 links below. - C.J. The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not by Jon Bergmann, Jerry Overmyer and Brett Wilie There has been a lot of interest in the flipped classroom. The traditional definition of a flipped class is: The Flipped Classroom is NOT: A synonym for online videos. Originally published The Daily Riff July 2011 Jon Bergmann is one of the first teachers to flip his classroom and has recently co-authored a book on the the Flipped Class which is to be published by ISTE press. Video Montage from Conference Below

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