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Turning a classroom upside down

Turning a classroom upside down
Roshan, her AP Calculus teacher at the private Bullis School in Potomac, told students that they would be learning their lessons at home with help from videos and other materials that she had made, and then would do “homework” problems in class. Roshan had “flipped” her class — a trend in teaching and classroom management that has been adopted by thousands of teachers across the country for a variety of different subjects. It is a reimagination of life in a classroom. The philosophy behind the flip is that teachers can spend time working with students who need their help in the classroom — and students can work together to solve problems — rather than sitting home alone with work they might not understand and with nobody to ask for help. Skeptics raise questions about flipped classrooms: How many subjects are really appropriate for this technique? “My AP Calc class was a really anxious environment,” said Roshan. Gutschick said she thinks her teacher has succeeded. Related:  Flipped Classroom and Online Learning

The Curious Case of the Flipped-Bloom's Meme (This is the sequel to 'Anatomy of a (Flipped) Meme') rss / email subscribe / follow Steve Last post I dug up the history of the Flipped Classroom idea. In this thrilling conclusion I look a variant: the "Flipped Bloom's Taxonomy" meme, which isn't even a meme yet, although in the last three weeks it has looked to get enough traction via one very influential blog post. Do a google image search for Bloom's and see what shapes you get: The very first image has been FLIPPED upside down! Never Meant to Be One Way Of course, Bloom's taxonomy was never meant to be linear or sequential. The version I always knew was a pyramid: But as with the general flipped learning meme, if you look you can find plenty of examples dating back years. This looks like a flipped pyramid right here, dating from 2001: And the taxonomy was revised in 2000 by Loren Anderson, who also appears to have turned it upside down, although I can't get a really good reference for this. May 5 - A Conversation with Aaron Sams 17 May - 2

4 Ways Flipping Forces Fundamental Change - Getting Smart by Susan Lucille Davis - edchat, edreform, flipped classroom Email Share June 14, 2012 - by Susan Lucille Davis 0 Email Share Photo Courtesy of Flickr: kkimpel I generally like the idea of turning things upside-down if only to see what happens as a result. Flip #1: When and where should learning happen? At its core, flipping the classroom forces us to question the who-what-where-when-and-why of what we do. Flip #2: Why are we lecturing anyway? Too many teachers have confessed to me that they lecture because that’s what they think teaching is, or they lecture because the students won’t read assigned textbook selections and they have to deliver the content somehow (ironically, transferring one boring method of delivery into another). So, why do we feel compelled to do something that we know we do – let’s admit it – rather badly? Flip #3: How can we partner with parents? Let’s face it. Flip #4: Why not be more transparent? Flipping the classroom forces us to reckon with this kind of completely naked exposure of our teaching selves.

The Evolution of Classroom Technology Classrooms have come a long way. There’s been an exponential growth in educational technology advancement over the past few years. From overhead projectors to iPads, it’s important to understand not only what’s coming next but also where it all started. We’ve certainly come a long way but some things seem hauntingly similar to many years ago. Also in 1925, there were “schools of the air” that delivered lessons to millions of students simultaneously. Here’s a brief look at the evolution of classroom technology. c. 1650 – The Horn-Book Wooden paddles with printed lessons were popular in the colonial era. c. 1850 – 1870 – Ferule This is a pointer and also a corporal punishment device. 1870 – Magic Lantern The precursor to a slide projector, the ‘magic lantern’ projected images printed on glass plates and showed them in darkened rooms to students. c. 1890 – School Slate c. 1890 – Chalkboard c. 1900 – Pencil c. 1905 – Stereoscope c. 1925 – Film Projector c. 1925 – Radio c. 1930 – Overhead Projector

10 Tools to Help you Flip Your Classroom Two years ago I "flipped" my high school Anatomy & Physiology class. Read my previous post for the full story. I learned by trial and error. 2. : from the makers of Camtasia ( TechSmith ), this screen capture tool allows you to quickly capture a still image of all or part of your screen. 3. : You will be creating lots of presentations and handouts in your flipped classroom. 4. : After creating your recorded lectures and hand-outs, you will want somewhere to post them sot that your students can access them. The commercial version of wikispaces includes advertising. 5. : The internet has enabled like-minded people, scattered across the globe, quick and easy access to each other. 6. : created by the fathers of flip, Jon Bergman and Aaron Sams, the Flipped Class Network is a social community for teachers interested in and currently using the flipped classroom model. 7. : the cousin of Camtasia Studio (see #1 above), Jing is a light-weight screencasting tool.

‘Flip This Lesson’ From TED-Ed Tired of all those interesting and thought-provoking TED Talks? Me neither. But never one to rest on its laurels, TED-Ed is launching a new way to make these talks a bit more, well, perfect for you. Flip This Lesson It’s called ‘Flip This Lesson’ and it’s basically a video editing tool that lets you create lessons from the vast array of TED Talks. With this feature, educators can use, tweak, or completely redo any video lesson featured on TED-Ed, or create lessons from scratch based on a TEDTalk or any video from YouTube. The Killer Feature This new tool is an open platform which means you can use videos from TED, TED-Ed, or even any YouTube video. I can’t wait to see a talk by Sir Ken Robinson spliced together with Keyboard Cat. Read the full press announcement here .

Flipping for fitness By Jason Hahnstadt Read more by Contributor The flipped learning model can be applied in physical education classes with great success. Physical education (PE) teachers are often on the short end of the stick when it comes to technology innovations in school. When the battle of the bulge is fought every day in our schools, the conversations are usually more about removing the symptoms of childhood obesity, like limiting soda pop in vending machines and offering healthier school lunch options, than addressing the true cause of the problem–lack of overall physical activity. I know what you’re thinking – “Technology in PE? While I admit that PE is likely the last educational frontier you would expect to see being reshaped by the digital revolution, this is exactly what is happening at my school. I’m no technological pioneer. It’s amazing what happens when you embrace emerging technology in school. Flipping my PE class was actually pretty simple.

Flipped Classroom Higher Education Overview - Welcome to Flubaroo The grades created by Flubaroo will be located in an adjacent worksheet called "Grades", as shown: For each submission, Flubaroo will show which questions were answered correctly ("1" point"), which incorrectly ("0" points), and which were not graded. If less than 60% of students got a question correct, the question will be highlighted in orange to alert you. The Flubaroo menu will now offer you the ability to email each student their grades, view a summary report, or regrade the assignment. If you choose to email each student their grade, you'll be given the option to include an answer key in the email. Choosing "View Report" shows you a summary report of the grading. Want to try it out?

The Flipped Class Manifest Photo: Document with Red Line by Dukeii (Editor's Note: The conversation and interest in the flipped class continues . . . From our very first post about this topic in January 2011 to date (3/30/13), The Daily Riff has received 250,000+ views to related posts which are linked below - extending to over 100 countries. "The Flipped Classroom is an intentional shift of content which in turn helps move students back to the center of learning rather than the products of schooling." The Flipped Class Manifest The "Flipped Classroom" is a term that has recently taken root in education. What Does "Flip" Imply? "Flip" is a verb. Secondly, we are flipping the instructional process and using technology to "time-shift" direct instruction where appropriate. For instance, suppose you are teaching a lesson where students at some point will need to use technology to use a linear regression on their data. What Do Classes Look Like? How Does a Flipped Classroom Fit into Instruction? Final Thoughts

The Flipped Classroom is Hot, Hot, Hot There are news stories and web articles about reverse instruction, or ‘flipping the classroom’, published just about every day lately. Here’s 15 news stories from the last 4 weeks focused on this instructional technology phenomenon. Many of these articles mention ‘the flip’ in their title (and for every one of these, there have been one or two additional articles that discuss the concept). In addition to listing these articles here, I’ve also created and shared a video and a Slideshare deck to help to bring attention to this powerful idea and spread the word about it to educators everywhere. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 11. 13. 14. 15. It’s exciting to me to see this high level of interest in this topic, since I’ll be presenting on the subject at the Campus Technology 2012 Conference in Boston in July in my session, “Flipping the Classroom – Succeeding With Reverse Instruction”. About Kelly Walsh Print This Post

The truth about flipped learning By Aaron Sams and Brian Bennett Read more by Contributor May 31st, 2012 Ultimately, flipped learning is not about flipping the “when and where” instruction is delivered; it’s about flipping the attention away from the teacher and toward the learner. A flipped classroom is all about watching videos at home and then doing worksheets in class, right? Wrong! Consider carefully the assumptions and sources behind this oversimplified description. Many assumptions and misconceptions around the flipped class concept are circulating in educational and popular media. Assumption: Videos have to be assigned as homework. Although video is often used by teachers who flip their class, it is not a prerequisite, and by no means must a video be assigned as homework each night. Resulting misconception: Videos are just recorded lectures. For more news about flipped learning, see:Engaging Students with Flipped Learning Resulting misconception: Homework is bad; therefore a flipped class is bad.

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