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Answers To The Biggest Questions About Flipped Classrooms

Answers To The Biggest Questions About Flipped Classrooms
Flipped classrooms are truly changing education (see ‘ How To Flip An Entire School ‘ and a report on how the flipped classroom can improve test scores .) As a school psychologist intern highly interested in ‘flipping classrooms’, I have consulted with many teachers and school staff that have adopted (or have expressed interest in) the flipped classroom model, and those that have implemented the model, have nothing but great things to say. Below are some frequent questions I get about flipped classrooms from teachers; and my answers, based on personal interactions and professional consultations with teachers. Has it “solved” the homework problem? It is a giant leap in the right direction. As Scott Carr put in his article Homework That Motivates , “[the problem is that] …homework is seen as the pursuit of arbitrary points and compliance with a teacher’s request rather than a learning experience.” How did she ensure students were watching the videos?

http://edudemic.com/2012/11/flipped-classrooms/

Related:  Flipped Classroom Trends, Case Studies & StoriesInglés

More Teachers 'Flipping' The School Day Upside Down hide captionHigh school sophomore Jessica Miller watches her chemistry teacher's lectures on an iPad. Class time is used for working through problems and quizzes, rather than lecturing. Grace Hood/KUNC High school sophomore Jessica Miller watches her chemistry teacher's lectures on an iPad.

Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom The flipped classroom has been gathering steam for a few years now. The premise: watch videos of instruction or lecture at home, and do the “homework” with the teacher in class. The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not In reality, there isn’t a whole lot of philosophical or theoretical information that I believe I can personally share that will be cutting edge, or not met with a new debate.

Before We Flip Classrooms, Let's Rethink What We're Flipping To Integrated into their regular math classes, Globaloria students access online video tutorials and receive expert advice on how to build original educational video games about math topics. Photo credit: World Wide Workshop We're hearing a lot of talk about education in these back-to-school days, but a few conversations rise above the din. One such is the chatter about "flipped classrooms,"1 in which students listen to lectures at home and do homework at school.

Before and After the Flipped Class This is the first in a short series of guest posts. Each guest will be sharing their story of transformation. Each illustrates how one teacher transformed their classroom and their teaching practice. These illustrate how I see the flipped class as a way TO the "answers" facing educators. First up: John Fritzky The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con In 2012, I attended the ISTE conference in San Diego, CA. While I was only there for about 36 hours, it was easy for me to pick up on one of the hottest topics for the three-day event. The "flipped classroom" was being discussed in social lounges, in conference sessions, on the exhibit floor, on the hashtag and even at dinner. People wanted to know what it was, what it wasn't, how it's done and why it works. Others wanted to sing its praises and often included a vignette about how it works in their classroom and how it transformed learning for their students. Still others railed that the model is nothing transformative at all and that it still emphasizes sage-on-the-stage direct instruction rather than student-centered learning.

How To Flip An Entire School I’m the Principal at Clintondale High School – a financially disadvantaged high school located outside of Detroit. Our school has been in debt for the past decade, and during the recession our area suffered immensely. 74 percent of our 570 students qualify for the free or reduced lunch program, 38 percent receive special education services and 70 percent are a racial minority. Like many schools around the country, our students were not doing well in class, and many were failing – two years ago our failure rate was 61 percent. Flipped Classroom 2.0: Competency Learning With Videos The flipped classroom model generated a lot of excitement initially, but more recently some educators — even those who were initial advocates — have expressed disillusionment with the idea of assigning students to watch instructional videos at home and work on problem solving and practice in class. Biggest criticisms: watching videos of lectures wasn’t all that revolutionary, that it perpetuated bad teaching and raised questions about equal access to digital technology. Now flipped classroom may have reached equilibrium, neither loved nor hated, just another potential tool for teachers — if done well. “You never want to get stuck in a rut and keep doing the same thing over and over,” said Aaron Sams, a former high school chemistry teacher turned consultant who helped pioneer flipped classroom learning in an edWeb webinar.

6 Expert Tips for Flipping the Classroom Tech-Enabled Learning | Feature 6 Expert Tips for Flipping the Classroom Three leaders in flipped classroom instruction share their best practices for creating a classroom experience guaranteed to inspire lifelong learning. By Jennifer Demski01/23/13 "If you were to step into one of my classrooms, you'd think I was teaching a kindergarten class, not a physics class," laughs Harvard University (MA) professor Eric Mazur. "Not because the students are children, but because of the chaos and how oblivious the students are to my presence." 'Flipped classroom' gains popularity in schools Flip That Class: A "Flipped Classroom" at New Egypt HS. In a General Chemistry class taught by Dr. Kathleen Chesmel, students watch class lessons at home on video and do their homework in school. Video by Bob Bielk For science teacher Kathleen Chesmel's students at New Egypt High School, homework rarely means hours spent poring over textbooks or hounding parents for problem-solving help.

Outsourced Lectures Raise Concerns About Academic Freedom - Technology By Steve Kolowich S tudents at Massachusetts Bay Community College this year got a rare opportunity to take a computer-science course designed and taught online by some of the top professors in the field. The 17 students in a programming course at MassBay's Wellesley Hills campus watched recorded lectures and completed online homework assignments created by professors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and offered as a massive open online course through edX, a nonprofit MOOC vendor co-founded by MIT. The MassBay students met for regular class sessions with Harold Riggs, a professor of computer science at the community college. Students were required to come for only 90 minutes each week, rather than the customary three hours.

Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped-classroom model, or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. Part 1: Flipping The Classroom? … 12 Resources To Keep You On Your Feet Welcome to another post rich in resources. If you have come here looking for links that will guide you to videos and multimedia to use in a Flipped Classroom that is coming in a future post. Perhaps you have tried a little Flip of your own and want to learn more. If you are beginning to investigate what a Flipped Classroom is, with the thought of possibly trying some kind of Flip yourself… then this is also the right place. I have researched and tried to find you the very best resources to get educators in all positions thinking about what a Flipped Classroom” really is”?

Creating Homework Tutorials (flipped classroom light) on youtube A month ago the renowned educational technology guru, Alan November, came to speak at my school in Tokyo. Though he was only visiting Seisen for a day, he pitched several ideas and encouraged us to choose a few that resonated and experiment with them. One big idea was to let students “own the learning,” and Alan not only promoted the flipped classroom idea but wanted students to be publishing to the world.

The flipped classroom: What to do and not to do The original concept of flipped classroom found teachers turning their lectures into online videos for viewing outside of class. (Shutterstock photo) Teachers all over the country are flipping out over a new progressive education model: The flipped classroom. In a nutshell, the idea of the flipped classroom is based around the question: What’s the best use of class time?

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