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¿Le damos la vuelta al aula…? The Flipped Classroom

¿Le damos la vuelta al aula…? The Flipped Classroom

http://e-aprendizaje.es/2012/10/15/le-damos-la-vuelta-al-aula-the-flipped-classroom/

Flip Your Classroom Essential Questions: Opening Doors to Student Understanding The authors of Understanding by Design explore how to design and frame essential questions that prompt students to think deeply and create a more stimulating environment for learning. More Flipping the Classroom: A revolutionary approach to learning presents some pros and cons Illustration by Brian Stauffer Back in 2007, two high school science teachers in Woodland Park, CO, decided to try a “crazy idea.” “We said, ‘What if we stopped lecturing and committed all our lectures to videos?’” says Jon Bergmann, now the lead technology facilitator at the Joseph Sears School in Kenilworth, IL. He and fellow educator Aaron Sams posted their short films—15 to 20 minutes long—for students to watch at home.

The Flipped Foreign Language Classroom: RESOURCES The Flipped Language Classroom RESOURCES Below are resources for exploring the possibilities of the flipped classroom, professional learning networks where educators are discussing blended learning and reverse instruction, and tools for designing your own flipped language classroom! What? Flipped teaching is a form of blended learning which encompasses any use of Internet technology to leverage the learning in a classroom, so a teacher can spend more time interacting with students instead of lecturing. This is most commonly being done using teacher-created videos that students view outside of class time.

27 Simple Ways To Flip The Classroom 7 Ways To Use Your iPad In The Classroom 14.67K Views 0 Likes There's a plethora of ways to use your iPad in the classroom but this infographic details some insanely useful apps, methods, and ideas for all teachers. Research, Reports & Studies / Research Research on Flipped Learning Looking for original research, case studies, surveys, infographics or our Literature Reviews? What is the difference between a Flipped Class and Flipped Learning? Along with the Four Pillars of F-L-I-P and 11 indicators. Written by the board and practitioners of the FLN. Project Tomorrow and the FLN: Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom The flipped classroom has been gathering steam for a few years now. The premise: watch videos of instruction or lecture at home, and do the “homework” with the teacher in class. The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not In reality, there isn’t a whole lot of philosophical or theoretical information that I believe I can personally share that will be cutting edge, or not met with a new debate. I’ll let you access the flood of stories on Khan Academy if you wish to engage in that conversation. The Flipped Class: What Does a Good One Look Like?

The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. See Part 2 and 3 links below. - C.J. Westerberg The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con In 2012, I attended the ISTE conference in San Diego, CA. While I was only there for about 36 hours, it was easy for me to pick up on one of the hottest topics for the three-day event. The "flipped classroom" was being discussed in social lounges, in conference sessions, on the exhibit floor, on the hashtag and even at dinner. People wanted to know what it was, what it wasn't, how it's done and why it works.

Harvey Mudd professors' research suggests 'flipped' classes might not be worth the hassle The concept of the "flipped classroom" has become the education world's darling within the past few years. In a flipped classroom, students watch their professors' lectures online before class, while spending class time working on hands-on, "real world" problems. The potential of the model has many educators thrilled — it could be the end of vast lecture halls, students falling asleep and boring, monotone professors. But four professors at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, Calif. who are studying the effectiveness of a flipped classroom have bad news for advocates of the trend: it might not make any difference. On Oct. 1, professors Nancy Lape, Karl Haushalter, Rachel Levy and Darryl Yong received funding for a three-year, $199,544 grant from the National Science Foundation to study the effects of the flipped classroom on students' learning.

The Flipped Class as a Way TO the Answers One common criticism of the the Flipped Class is that it really isn’t that big of a change. A recorded lecture is still just a lecture. Instead of students sitting in a room and hearing a “boring” lecture we bore them at home. There really isn’t anything revolutionary about a video lecture.

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