background preloader

Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom

Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom
The flipped classroom has been gathering steam for a few years now. The premise: watch videos of instruction or lecture at home, and do the “homework” with the teacher in class. The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not In reality, there isn’t a whole lot of philosophical or theoretical information that I believe I can personally share that will be cutting edge, or not met with a new debate. The Flipped Class: What Does a Good One Look Like? So instead of telling you what a flipped classroom is and what a flipped classroom is not, I decided to go to the specialists, the teachers in my district, to find out how the flipped classroom is, or is not, working for them in their actual classroom. A simple note sent to the staff began a wave of information that I’m excited to share. Classroom management tips to get parents more involved in your classroom. Today we honor the unsung heroes of the teaching profession, the fleet of... Tips to help you discover how to motivate students. Positives: Related:  Flipped Classroom Dos, Dont's, Pros & ConsFlipped Classroom Dos and Don'tsInglés

The flipped classroom: What to do and not to do The original concept of flipped classroom found teachers turning their lectures into online videos for viewing outside of class. (Shutterstock photo) Teachers all over the country are flipping out over a new progressive education model: The flipped classroom. In a nutshell, the idea of the flipped classroom is based around the question: What’s the best use of class time? “Chemistry teachers like it because they love to do labs with their students,” Jerry Overmyer, a mathematics and science outreach coordinator at the Univ. of Northern Colorado’s MAST Institute, told VOXXI. Overmyer, who is the creator of the Flipped Learning Network, added the result is chemistry students are learning a lot more because they take notes at home before coming to class to “do the fun stuff.” For those teachers and educators thinking about embracing the flipped classroom model, here are a few tips about what to do and not to do when making the change. What to do in a flipped classroom Take your time.

The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con In 2012, I attended the ISTE conference in San Diego, CA. While I was only there for about 36 hours, it was easy for me to pick up on one of the hottest topics for the three-day event. The "flipped classroom" was being discussed in social lounges, in conference sessions, on the exhibit floor, on the hashtag and even at dinner. People wanted to know what it was, what it wasn't, how it's done and why it works. Others wanted to sing its praises and often included a vignette about how it works in their classroom and how it transformed learning for their students. Still others railed that the model is nothing transformative at all and that it still emphasizes sage-on-the-stage direct instruction rather than student-centered learning. What It Is The authors go on to explain that the model is a mixture of direct instruction and constructivism, that it makes it easier for students who may have missed class to keep up because they can watch the videos at any time. What It Isn't Why It Works

Flipping the Classroom Printable Version “Flipping the classroom” has become something of a buzzword in the last several years, driven in part by high profile publications in The New York Times (Fitzpatrick, 2012); The Chronicle of Higher Education (Berrett, 2012); and Science (Mazur, 2009); In essence, “flipping the classroom” means that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then use class time to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge, perhaps through problem-solving, discussion, or debates. Bloom's Taxonomy (Revised)In terms of Bloom’s revised taxonomy (2001), this means that students are doing the lower levels of cognitive work (gaining knowledge and comprehension) outside of class, and focusing on the higher forms of cognitive work (application, analysis, synthesis, and/or evaluation) in class, where they have the support of their peers and instructor. What is it? | Does it work? What is it? Flipped Classroom Inverted Classroom

The Flipped Class as a Way TO the Answers One common criticism of the the Flipped Class is that it really isn’t that big of a change. A recorded lecture is still just a lecture. Instead of students sitting in a room and hearing a “boring” lecture we bore them at home. There really isn’t anything revolutionary about a video lecture. If all the flipped classroom is lectures at home and homework in class, then yes–I agree with the pundits: The Flipped Class is just window dressing on a broken system. I believe that the flipped class is NOT the answer to today’s educational problems. However: I do believe that: The Flipped Class is a way TO the answers. I have seen countless teachers who have STARTED with the traditional flipped class. Aaron Sams and I only spent one year flipping our class in a traditional manner. For those teachers who are already using one or more of these deeper teaching pedagogies, you should not flip your class. For these teachers, we want to help them move to deeper learning strategies. I hope all is well.

6 Expert Tips for Flipping the Classroom Tech-Enabled Learning | Feature 6 Expert Tips for Flipping the Classroom Three leaders in flipped classroom instruction share their best practices for creating a classroom experience guaranteed to inspire lifelong learning. By Jennifer Demski01/23/13 "If you were to step into one of my classrooms, you'd think I was teaching a kindergarten class, not a physics class," laughs Harvard University (MA) professor Eric Mazur. "Not because the students are children, but because of the chaos and how oblivious the students are to my presence." Such pandemonium is a good thing, insists Mazur, an early adopter of the flipped classroom model that has become all the rage at colleges and universities across the country. In a flipped classroom, professors assign pre-class homework consisting of brief, recorded lectures and presentations, digital readings with collaborative annotation capabilities, and discussion board participation. 2) Be up front with your expectations.

Mark Frydenberg: The Flipped Classroom: It's Got to Be Done Right As screen-savvy, digital-native Millenials reach college, a dynamic new teaching method is rising across America: the flipped classroom. The premise of a flipped classroom is simple: Instead of lecturing in class and giving homework at home, flip it: give the lectures at home, and do the homework in class. Lectures have been recorded for years, of course. But in 2007, high school teachers Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams pioneered a new movement when they recorded their PowerPoint presentations for students who missed class to watch on their portable music players. What's the flap about the flip? Technology plays a big part in a successful flipped learning experience: while the majority of Bentley students have a smart phone or a laptop for at-home lecture listening, that is not the case at all universities, let alone public high schools. Traditional lecture hall = students bored and distracted. The flipped class = students alert and engaged. A bonus out of all this flipping out?

Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped-classroom model, or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. It fosters the "guide on the side" mentality and role, rather than that of the "sage of the stage." It also creates the opportunity for differentiated roles to meet the needs of students through a variety of instructional activities. 1) Need to Know How are you creating a need to know the content that is recorded? 2) Engaging Models One of the best way to create the "need to know" is to use a pedagogical model that demands this. 3) Technology What technology do you have to support the flipped classroom? 4) Reflection Every time you have students watch a video, just like you would with any instructional activity, you must build in reflective activities to have students think about what they learned, how it will help them, its relevance, and more. 5) Time and Place

Flipping is a Flop | Reflections of a CoETaIL Journey Original photo courtesy of Agribusiness Teaching Center via Wikipedia I have never formally tried to flip my classroom, and before this week’s research I wasn’t clear about my beliefs around reverse instruction or a flipped classroom. I will say that although I have used tools like Khan Academy and BrainPop to supplement instruction in class and out, I never got the sense that a full on flip was worth my time. After digging in to the pros and cons, I feel that this is one of the many “technological” ideas that flops because it is still used to the things we have always done; just as Marc Prensky describes as “doing old things in new ways”. One of the first posts I came across, The Flip: End of a Love Affair, was written by a teacher who had formerly loved the idea of a flipped classroom. The reality is that many if not most teachers who opt for the flipped classroom strategy are not pursuing a student-centered approach to teaching and learning. Photo courtesy of Dan Foy via Flickr

Key Questions You Should Ask Before You Flip Your Class I am preparing to do a workshop with Icelandic Educators this week and I was asked to give them a list of questions to consider as they begin to flip their classes. As I wrote these I realized that many people could benefit from these questions. It is no doubt an incomplete list. Overall Questions What is the best use of your face-to-face class time? Technical Questions about Video Creation: What software will you use to make your videos? Classroom Questions How will you monitor if the students watched the video? Like this: Like Loading...

Related: