background preloader

To Flip Or Not Flip?

To Flip Or Not Flip?
To flip or not to flip? That is not the essential question. In assessing the optimal classroom dynamics, I would argue that we need to take a good look at what our classrooms look like right now, what activities our students gain the most from, what we wished we had more time for, and what things about our class we wish we could eliminate. Do I flip: yes. Would I recommend it: enthusiastically. But let’s start by rewinding for a minute, to my 2009 AP Calculus class. Running Out Of Time Worst of all, I felt that I never got to hear from my students because they were trying their best to digest the newly presented material. So I asked myself the same questions that I posed at the beginning of this essay: what is working, what is not, and what do I wish I had more time for? Planning In math, we often have the preconceived notion of a boring, rigid learning environment where the teacher lectures and the students do endless practice problems until the skill is mastered.

Moving the Flipped Class « Educator I have not written for almost two weeks now. Half of the reason is because of writer’s block, another half because school is crazy, and a third half because of some family issues that came up unexpectedly. I opened up my blog a few times with intention to write, but I could not get anything to form. There has been a lot happening with the Flipped Classroom recently…almost too much to list. The Flipped Classroom book by Jon and Aaron being published by ISTE had its release date moved up a month because of high demand.Ted-Ed launched.The Flipped Learning Network began.The Flipped Class Network NING passed 4000 registered members.The #flipclass hashtag on Twitter is exploding with links, articles, and connections. Plus, dozens of articles on the flipped classroom. As I have been reading and following articles and discussions, one thing stood out: the prevailing description of the flipped classroom is “videos at home, ‘homework’ in school.” Flickr CC, Viernest

Flipping the Classroom 4/27/2012 By: Teachers from around the world have adopted the flipped classroom model and are using it to teach a variety of courses to students of all ages. In the excerpt below from the book, Flip Your Classroom (©2012, ISTE® International Society for Technology in Education and ASCD), authors Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams outline reasons why educators should consider this model. Flipping speaks the language of today’s students. Flipping helps busy students. Flipping helps struggling students. Flipping helps students of all abilities to excel. Flipping allows students to pause and rewind their teacher. Flipping increases student–teacher interaction. Flipping changes classroom management. Flipping educates parents. Flipping makes your class transparent. Flipping is a great technique for absent teachers. Flipping can lead to the flipped-mastery program. VIDEO TIP: MAKING A ONE-TAKE VIDEO By Michael Gorman Assign the Groups In the spirit of PBL, students should be divided into groups.

How to implement the ‘flipped classroom’ As teachers adopt the flipped model, they’re using the extra time in many ways, depending on their subject matter, location, and style of teaching. (Editor’s note: Flipped learning, in which students watch instructional videos for homework and use class time to practice what they’ve learned, is catching on in many schools. This is an excerpt from a new book by two pioneers of the flipped approach, titled Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. Copyright 2012, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) and ASCD; reprinted with permission from ISTE.) Despite the attention that the videos get, the greatest benefit to any flipped classroom is not the videos. As we have seen teachers adopt the flipped model, they use the extra time in myriad ways depending on their subject matter, location, and style of teaching. Foreign Language Classes Math Classes Science Classes

UDL and The Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture In response to all of the attention given to the flipped classroom, I proposed The Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture and The Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture for Higher Education in which the viewing of videos (often discussed on the primary focus of the flipped classroom) becomes a part of a larger cycle of learning based on an experiential cycle of learning. Universal Design for Learning has also been in the news lately as a new report Universal Design for Learning (UDL): Initiatives on the Move was released by the National Center on UDL, May, 2012. This post describes the principles of Universal Design for Learning and how they naturally occur when a full cycle of learning, including ideas related to the flipped classroom, are used within the instructional process. Universal Design for Learning The UDL framework: Source: More about UDL can be found at: Some of the key findings of the Universal Design for Learning (UDL): Initiatives on the Move study:

Flipping Blooms Taxonomy Teacher Shelley Wright is on leave from her classroom, working with teachers in a half-dozen high schools to promote inquiry and connected learning. I think the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is wrong. Hear me out. I know this statement sounds heretical in the realms of education, but I think this is something we should rethink, especially since it is so widely taught to pre-service teachers. Old-school Blooms: Arduous climb for learners Conceived in 1956 by a group of educators chaired by Benjamin Bloom, the taxonomy classifies skills from least to most complex. Many teachers in many classrooms spend the majority of their time in the basement of the taxonomy, never really addressing or developing the higher order thinking skills that kids need to develop. I dislike the pyramid because it creates the impression that there is a scarcity of creativity — only those who can traverse the bottom levels and reach the summit can be creative. Here’s what I propose. Blooms 21 works great in science

The Flipped Classroom is Hot, Hot, Hot There are news stories and web articles about reverse instruction, or ‘flipping the classroom’, published just about every day lately. Here’s 15 news stories from the last 4 weeks focused on this instructional technology phenomenon. Many of these articles mention ‘the flip’ in their title (and for every one of these, there have been one or two additional articles that discuss the concept). In addition to listing these articles here, I’ve also created and shared a video and a Slideshare deck to help to bring attention to this powerful idea and spread the word about it to educators everywhere. If you want to spread the word too, please pass this article or one of these other presentations on to your colleagues. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 11. 13. 14. 15. About Kelly Walsh Kelly Walsh is Chief Information Officer, and an adjunct faculty member, at The College of Westchester in White Plains, NY and is the founder and author of EmergingEdTech.com. Print This Post

Flipteaching The “Flipped Classroom” starts with one question: what is the best use of my face-to-face class time? May 22, 2012 If you’ve implemented (or even heard of) the flipped classroom approach to teaching, you have Jonathan Bergmann to thank. Bergmann, along with fellow teacher Aaron Sams, pioneered the idea, and Bergmann is committed to helping other educators apply it in classrooms around the world. I had the opportunity to talk to Bergmann recently, and I learned what’s so special about the flipped classroom (hint: it doesn’t cost a thing), and how it has changed the lives of students Can you describe how your professional achievements have advanced innovation in education? The flipped class is a sweeping innovation which has gotten a lot of traction. What has changed as a result of your efforts? I have heard countless stories about how the flipped class is changing kids’ lives. How can others facing similar challenges implement what you’ve learned through your work? Stick with it. How have you applied technology in innovative ways to support your work? I would get them an iPad. Mrs.

Related:  flipclass info