background preloader

To Flip Or Not Flip?

To Flip Or Not Flip?
To flip or not to flip? That is not the essential question. In assessing the optimal classroom dynamics, I would argue that we need to take a good look at what our classrooms look like right now, what activities our students gain the most from, what we wished we had more time for, and what things about our class we wish we could eliminate. Do I flip: yes. Would I recommend it: enthusiastically. But let’s start by rewinding for a minute, to my 2009 AP Calculus class. Running Out Of Time Worst of all, I felt that I never got to hear from my students because they were trying their best to digest the newly presented material. So I asked myself the same questions that I posed at the beginning of this essay: what is working, what is not, and what do I wish I had more time for? Planning In math, we often have the preconceived notion of a boring, rigid learning environment where the teacher lectures and the students do endless practice problems until the skill is mastered. Related:  Flipped Classroom

7 Fabulous iPad Apps to Create Short Animated Lessons for Your Flipped Classroom Today, however, I am sharing with you a set of some wonderful apps that you can use to create short video lessons and tutorials to share with your students. You can also use them to : Easily explain a range of topics from math to chemistry to music theory to basket weaving.Attach a personal message to any travel photos you want to shareDiagram offensive and defensive strategies for sportsGrade student work with commentary explaining the reasoning behind their performanceImplement a “flipped classroom” Showcase your tutorials online and share your knowledge with your students, friends, family, or the world! I have meticulously handpicked the apps mentioned below and only included what I personally see as the best available out there. 1- Educreations This is my favourite of them all. 2- ShowMe ShowMe is similar to Educreations in that it also allows you to turn your iPad into a recordable iPad. 3- DoodleCast Pro 4- Explain Everything 5- Board Cam Pro 7- Knowmia

Warning Signs for Personalized Learning A more nuanced, shared language to describe how online and blended learning differ from other forms of digital instruction is crucial to lasting educational change. When Julie Young founded the Florida Virtual School in 1997, her team coined the slogan “any time, any place, any path, any pace” to describe how the school’s online courses liberate students from traditional classroom constraints. That phrase has become the mantra for people who are trying to articulate how K-12 schools need to change from a “factory-based” model, in which students progress in standardized batches with monolithic instruction, to a more personalized, student-centric model. The growing consensus is that, like it or not, digital technology is the one innovation that can bring personalized learning into reach, because it makes customized education for all students affordable. The trouble is that digital technology is a huge category, and many do not bother to unpack it.

Beyond the Basics of the Flipped Classroom E-Learning | Feature Beyond the Basics of the Flipped Classroom Flipped learning has been around long enough now for teachers to figure out their own variations. Here are seven tweaks to the flip worth trying in your classroom. By Dian Schaffhauser11/13/13 By now you know the basics of the flipped classroom. But teachers who have been practicing the flip have figured out new ways to tweak it to work for their students. Although Werner and Clarion use their techniques in science classes, the tweaks are relevant to just about any topic. 1. If you're using the mass of pre-recorded video content available through Teacher Tube, Khan Academy, or any of the other marvelous services, it's time to create your own. Werner keeps his videos to three to five minutes, which encourages students to watch it several times. 2. Werner and Clarion offered two routes for creating videos, the inexpensive one (preferred by Werner) and the high-quality one (preferred by Clarion).

Flipping Blooms Taxonomy Teacher Shelley Wright is on leave from her classroom, working with teachers in a half-dozen high schools to promote inquiry and connected learning. I think the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is wrong. Hear me out. I know this statement sounds heretical in the realms of education, but I think this is something we should rethink, especially since it is so widely taught to pre-service teachers. Old-school Blooms: Arduous climb for learners Conceived in 1956 by a group of educators chaired by Benjamin Bloom, the taxonomy classifies skills from least to most complex. Many teachers in many classrooms spend the majority of their time in the basement of the taxonomy, never really addressing or developing the higher order thinking skills that kids need to develop. I dislike the pyramid because it creates the impression that there is a scarcity of creativity — only those who can traverse the bottom levels and reach the summit can be creative. Here’s what I propose. Blooms 21 works great in science

Flipped Classroom 2.0: Competency Learning With Videos The flipped classroom model generated a lot of excitement initially, but more recently some educators — even those who were initial advocates — have expressed disillusionment with the idea of assigning students to watch instructional videos at home and work on problem solving and practice in class. Biggest criticisms: watching videos of lectures wasn’t all that revolutionary, that it perpetuated bad teaching and raised questions about equal access to digital technology. Now flipped classroom may have reached equilibrium, neither loved nor hated, just another potential tool for teachers — if done well. “You never want to get stuck in a rut and keep doing the same thing over and over,” said Aaron Sams, a former high school chemistry teacher turned consultant who helped pioneer flipped classroom learning in an edWeb webinar. “The flipped classroom is not about the video,” said Jonathan Bergmann, Sams’ fellow teacher who helped fine tune and improve a flipped classroom strategy.

Rise of the Machines: Robots as Teaching Aides Think back to when you were in grade school; were there ever any special tools or devices that teachers would sometimes use that got you excited about learning? I know that for me, any time that we were able to watch something on TV or use the computer lab, or even use dry-erase boards, the day was going to be more fun than usual. Kids going to school today, though, would be put to sleep by that sort of thing; now computers and even tablets in the classroom are becoming more and more common and they’re allowing kids to have fun while they’re learning. This new generation’s children are going to have something even cooler coming their way in terms of in-class technology: robots. Today’s infographic from onlineschools.com shows how robotic technology is advancing and how it will hopefully be integrated into learning in the not-too-distant future. For more details on this growing trend refer to the infographic below and onlineschools.com. Share This Infographic

Flowboard Reviews Flowboard is a storytelling and presentation app that allows anyone to make side-scrolling publications with images, text, videos, links, and photo galleries. Whether you have a story to tell, an idea to share, or a presentation to give, Flowboard allows you to create & present right from your iPad, or share to any device. Flowboards are fun, stylish, and entertaining. With Flowboard you create complete stories on your iPad using a few simple gestures. Easy to Start Choose from our growing library of templates tailored for presentations, portfolios, stories, catalogs, and more.Get inspired by our catalog of featured Flowboards.Add your photos and videos from your (NEW) Albums, Events, Camera Roll or Photo Stream.Use content from all the most popular cloud sources like Dropbox, Facebook, Box, Instagram, Google and more. Create and customize your screens Share, view, and present With Flowboard, you can: Flowboard is free to download and use.

Digital Badges For Learning in the Classroom and Beyond 6.20.12 | A pair of stories by Education Week reporter Katie Ash provides a big-picture overview of the pros and cons of digital badges and a close-up look at how badges are being used in a graduate course. Alex Halavais, who teaches a master’s program on interactive communications at Quinnipiac University, began implementing digital badges in place of a traditional grading scale last spring. The new system enables him—and his students’ prospective employers—to better gauge the specific skills his students master. “It’s an index of your learning biography,” Halavais told Education Week. “It allows you to stitch together your [educational career] in interesting ways.” In addition to substituting a certain number of badges for letter grades, Halavais also introduces a collaborative element. The badge system Halavais created relied on a peer-review process in which certain students who had achieved a certain level of badge could approve other students’ badges, says Rossi.

Related: