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Hallgatóknak a tükrözött osztályteremről-bevezető

Hallgatóknak a tükrözött osztályteremről-bevezető
Related:  Flipped Classroom

The Gamification of Higher Education - Neil B. Niman If we could design an educational experience where learning was a part of personal growth and development, would we create empowered individuals who would be better positioned to make a contribution upon their entry into the real world? Gamification has the potential to do just that. Instead of thinking about education as the mastery of a body of knowledge where the subject matter becomes the focus of our attention, The Gamification of Higher Education encourages us to think of it as a process that draws out the best in individuals and prepares them for happy, productive, and successful lives. Niman reveals how the power of games can be used to create an entirely new population of super-empowered individuals who are better positioned to acquire the skills they need to remain relevant in an ever-changing economy.

Edmodo Scavenger Hunt Video Playlist I finally decided to do something that I been putting off for too long - finishing my scavenger hunt videos (I only had three left to record, and it took me less than 5 minutes - shesh) and adding the last 8 mini-videos to my MentorMob playlist. So I did it today! I decided to do an edmodo scavenger hunt because some of my students will be familiar with edmodo (because I had them last year and we used it) and some of my students have most likely never heard of it (Some of my students last year did talk about it to students who weren't in my class). I decided to break the scavenger hunt into steps (18 to be exact) and include a checklist on paper so my students could check it off as they go and get a visual of their progress. Most of the videos are under 2 minutes (Step 12 or 13- can't remember which - is 5 minutes). Create your own Playlist on MentorMob! On a side note, I love mentor mob. I'm going to be working on Unit C - Pronouns and continuing to create my flipped class units.

Flipped-History The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos. And voila: a movement began. A 2014 survey from the Flipped Learning network found that 78% of teachers said they’d flipped a lesson, and 96% of those that tried it said they’d recommend it. What is a flipped classroom? Once a new idea becomes a buzzword, pinning down the definition can become a tad more challenging. That gets the idea across, but it’s a bit of a mouthful. Most people hear “flipped learning” and picture kids watching videos at home, but proponents of it suggest that it doesn’t have to be exclusively about videos. The Benefits of Flipping Your Classroom 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

How to flip the classroom | Flipped Institute Flipping is easy – and with a little thought and planning, teachers can use the flipped model to create engaging learning experiences for their students. This section covers the nuts and bolts of flipping – from creating videos, to introducing the flipped concept, to practical ideas for using class time differently. What are teachers saying? As an English teacher, I have several teaching concepts going at once, so flipping works well for me. I may have kids watch a lesson at home to learn about literary devices in a book we are reading in class. The flipped classroom is about making sure that the "voice" most often heard in the classroom is that of the student, not the teacher.

Wikis These four friends are going on a camping trip. They need to bring the right supplies because they're backpacking. The group needs to plan and plan well, so coordination is key. They're all computer users, so they start planning with an email. The important information is scattered across everyone's inbox. There is a better way. Most wikis work the same. The buttons are really important. Here are our camping friends and here is a wiki website. Once you're finished editing, you click save and the document becomes a webpage once again, and is ready for the next person to edit it - easy! Edit - Write - and Save. Mary signs up for a wiki site and then sees the new site for the first time. Now it's John's turn. Henry visits the wiki, clicks edit and he can edit the page. Frank saves the page and realizes something awesome. But wait! John visits the wiki and clicks edit to edit the page. John clicks save and next, Frank visits the wiki and sees the lists and the link to the new page.

Where is the pedagogy in flipped classrooms? Flipped Classroom Model Flipped classrooms can be generally thought of as a teaching approach where learners are first exposed to new content before class on their own and then process the information in a facilitated, group setting during class. Dr. Pedagogy before tech. What is Pedagogy? Pedagogy is basically the practice of teaching used to help learners with their lifelong endeavors. Active Learning Strategies One example of a poor pedagogical approach is the traditional lecture when it comes to learning. Other active learning strategies have been addressed in the literature. Another example is by Lukas et al [2], who found a higher correlation of knowledge retention in an active learning setting compared to a traditional lecture-based setting. Although not a new concept, active learning strategies have been difficult to implement as documented by Graffam [4]. Flipped Classroom: Information Overload Role of Textbooks Reading with a Critical Eye Flipped Classrooms and Video References: Image

Flip Your PD for Extra Flexibility & Support One of the most popular topics in education today is the Flipped Classroom, a model in which teachers send their students home with a lesson (usually in the form of a video) and then engage in exercises and practice in the classroom after the fact. It has many advantages, namely getting the basic nuances out of the way and working on projects and problems with the teacher in the room. This year at my school, I’ve been inspired by this model to flip our tech-related professional development. Videos usually work best When I flip my educational technology workshops and staff events, I use a variety of tools –primarily screencasts, instructional videos, and some step by step how-to lists. There are a myriad of tools available for recording video on screen (I love Camtasia and Snagit by Techsmith for capturing directly from the screen; if I want to do an iPad video I use them in conjunction with AirServer). Flipping in Advance Teachers are exceptionally busy, especially during the school year.

8 Steps To Flipped Teacher Professional Development How To Help Teachers Create Their Own Professional Development by Terry Heick Traditional teacher professional development depends on external training handed down to teachers after having identified their weaknesses as a professional. If you’re not so great at teacher writing, or if assessment is becoming a bigger focus in your school or district, you fill out a growth plan of some sort, attend your training, get your certificates, and repeat until you’ve got your hours or your school has run out of money to send you to more training. Oftentimes these “professional growth plans” are scribbled out in 15 minute meetings with your principal, then “revisited” at the end of the year as a kind of autopsy. What would happen if we flipped this model on its head? The idea here isn’t simply that educators can improve by connected through social networks–they already are doing that. Also, note that none of this precludes national level conferences, on-site PD, and the like. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Project Based Learning You remember what it was like in school. IT WAS BORING! You sat in class, memorized as much as you could and tried to pass a test at the end. But is that good enough? These days school can be more interesting and effective by focusing students on work that matters. Most adults live in a world of projects. Let’s take a look at this Project Based World. Claire came out of the project looking like a rock star and she learned a lot about green products. The world needs more Claires. The answer is Project Based Learning or PBL. Here’s what I mean. Mr. After dividing the class into teams, he got them started on the project. The project teams showed off their final work to an enthusiastic audience of parents and their children at a nearby elementary school. His students practiced critical thinking, collaboration and communication. I'm Lee LeFever, and this has been Project Based Learning Explained by Common Craft.

We Didn’t Know What We Didn’t Know: Flipped Learning 3.0 – Flipped Learning Global Initiative By Jon Bergmann and Errol St.Clair Smith Pop Quiz: Most educators know about the Socratic method. True or false? Let’s go with true. But why was Socrates called the wisest man in the world? The answer? Fast Forward a Couple Thousand Years. Today, with a swipe and a few keystrokes, we can access virtually all the knowledge in the known world from a device that’s smaller than an index card. Best of all, when we’re feeling particularly lazy, we can simply say, “ Hey Siri, who the heck is Socrates anyway?” Yet, despite the super-human ways we can now access knowledge, it’s astounding how often we still don’t know what we don’t know. Five Things We Didn’t Know about Flipped Learning Together we have over 40 years experience in education. But in 2016 we discovered that we were blind men walking around without a cane. We eventually tripped over the depth and scope of our ignorance and myopia. #1 Flipped Learning Is Not Static This sentiment bubbles to the surface in many ways.

Resources for Flipped Classroom After careful reflection on my predominantly direct instruction approach to teaching middle school math, I came to the realization that the majority of the students sitting in my classroom were maybe not listening to my lessons. Why? Well, this is not the way our students learn. When they want information, they Google it or look it up on YouTube. As a teacher depending predominately on direct instruction, I found I was repeating myself AFTER teaching the content to the class. It seem like around 30% didn’t need my instructions, 30% were so far behind that they didn’t understand what I taught and the other 40% learned from my instruction. My students’ standardized test scores continue to grow.

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