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Introduction to Our Flipped Classroom

Introduction to Our Flipped Classroom

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRO6oAEGbSI

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The Gamification of Higher Education - Neil B. Niman If we could design an educational experience where learning was a part of personal growth and development, would we create empowered individuals who would be better positioned to make a contribution upon their entry into the real world? Gamification has the potential to do just that. Instead of thinking about education as the mastery of a body of knowledge where the subject matter becomes the focus of our attention, The Gamification of Higher Education encourages us to think of it as a process that draws out the best in individuals and prepares them for happy, productive, and successful lives. Niman reveals how the power of games can be used to create an entirely new population of super-empowered individuals who are better positioned to acquire the skills they need to remain relevant in an ever-changing economy.

Creating Video Tutorials for a Flipped classroom A Flipped Classroom is a teaching model which reverses traditional methods. Instruction is delivered at home through interactive websites, teacher-created videos or content and moves the homework style learning to the classroom. Class time is used for creating tasks, exercises and problem solving while the teacher is present to assist and give immediate feedback whereas the homework is designated for learning content and students can form questions about what they have learnt to prepare for their next lesson. This allows the teacher more time to interact with the students. Some teachers like to create informative videos or ask students to create the videos for younger students. These can be made using screencasting software and some apps, such as:

How to flip the classroom Flipping is easy – and with a little thought and planning, teachers can use the flipped model to create engaging learning experiences for their students. This section covers the nuts and bolts of flipping – from creating videos, to introducing the flipped concept, to practical ideas for using class time differently. What are teachers saying? Transcripts - YouTube Help Transcripts are a simple way of creating captions. They only contain the text of what is said in the video and you don't need to enter any time codes. You can enter a transcript directly in your video or follow the steps below to create a transcript file. Transcripts work best with videos that are less than an hour long with good sound quality and clear speech.

Blendspace - Create lessons with digital content in 5 minutes Make mobile learning awesome! Student creation Share materials Free! Get our new app! 8 Steps To Flipped Teacher Professional Development How To Help Teachers Create Their Own Professional Development by Terry Heick Traditional teacher professional development depends on external training handed down to teachers after having identified their weaknesses as a professional. If you’re not so great at teacher writing, or if assessment is becoming a bigger focus in your school or district, you fill out a growth plan of some sort, attend your training, get your certificates, and repeat until you’ve got your hours or your school has run out of money to send you to more training.

Add subtitles and closed captions - YouTube Help You can transcribe your video and automatically line up your text with the speech in the video. A transcript contains the text of what is said in a video, but no time code information, so you need to set the timing to sync with your video. Note: Since the transcript text is automatically synchronized to your video, the transcript must be in a language supported by our speech recognition technology and in the same language that's spoken in the video. Transcripts are not recommended for videos that are over an hour long or have poor audio quality. Choose the language for the subtitles or closed captions you want to create. Silent film lesson Video is often used in the EFL classroom for listening comprehension activities, facilitating discussions and, of course, language work. But how can you exploit silent films without any language in them? Since developing learners' linguistic resources should be our primary goal (well, at least the blogger behind the blog thinks so), here are four suggestions on how language (grammar and vocabulary) can be generated from silent clips. Split-viewing Split-viewing is an information gap activity where the class is split into groups with one group facing the screen and the other with their back to the screen.

Government Class Inside pbs.org Photo: pbs.org Game based learning versus gamification There is a lot of talk and buzz in the education, e-learning and m-learning sectors about gamification and game based learning. But what is the difference between game based learning and gamification? And how can they be deployed in your course? In this article we will look at game based learning versus gamification.

What the Web Said Yesterday Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 took off from Amsterdam at 10:31 A.M. G.M.T. on July 17, 2014, for a twelve-hour flight to Kuala Lumpur. Not much more than three hours later, the plane, a Boeing 777, crashed in a field outside Donetsk, Ukraine. All two hundred and ninety-eight people on board were killed. The plane’s last radio contact was at 1:20 P.M. G.M.T.

Lectures Aren't Just Boring, They're Ineffective, Too, Study Finds Are your lectures droning on? Change it up every 10 minutes with more active teaching techniques and more students will succeed, researchers say. A new study finds that undergraduate students in classes with traditional stand-and-deliver lectures are 1.5 times more likely to fail than students in classes that use more stimulating, so-called active learning methods. “Universities were founded in Western Europe in 1050 and lecturing has been the predominant form of teaching ever since,” says biologist Scott Freeman of the University of Washington, Seattle. But many scholars have challenged the “sage on a stage” approach to teaching science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses, arguing that engaging students with questions or group activities is more effective.

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