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6 Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students

What’s the opposite of scaffolding a lesson? Saying to students, “Read this nine-page science article, write a detailed essay on the topic it explores, and turn it in by Wednesday.” Yikes—no safety net, no parachute, no scaffolding—they’re just left blowing in the wind. Let’s start by agreeing that scaffolding a lesson and differentiating instruction are two different things. Scaffolding is breaking up the learning into chunks and then providing a tool, or structure, with each chunk. When scaffolding reading, for example, you might preview the text and discuss key vocabulary, or chunk the text and then read and discuss as you go. Simply put, scaffolding is what you do first with kids—for those students who are still struggling, you may need to differentiate by modifying an assignment and/or making accommodations (for example, by choosing more accessible text and/or assigning an alternative project). Scaffolding and differentiation do have something in common, though. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/scaffolding-lessons-six-strategies-rebecca-alber

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Strategies: Show & Tell, Tap Into Prior Knowledge, Give Time to Talk, Preteach Vocabulary, Use Visual Aids, Pause/Ask Questions/Pause/Review. I will try them all! by dipperyt Mar 9

(from the website): What's the opposite of scaffolding a lesson? It would be saying to students something like, "Read this nine-page science article, write a detailed essay on the topic it explores, and turn it in by Wednesday." Yikes -- no safety net, no parachute, no scaffolding -- just left blowing in the wind. by dipperyt Mar 9

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