background preloader

Lesson Plans – Search Education – Google

Lesson Plans – Search Education – Google
Picking the right search terms Beginner Pick the best words to use in academic searching, whether students are beginning with a full question or a topic of just a few words. View lesson Advanced Explore "firm" and "soft" search terms, and practice using context terms to locate subject-specific collections of information on the web. Understanding search results Learn about the different parts of the results page, and about how to evaluate individual results based on cues like web addresses and snippets. Engage additional search strategies, such as generalization and specialization. Narrowing a search to get the best results Apply filtering tools and basic "operators" to narrow search results. Compare results for basic searches with ones that use operators to discover the impact the right operator has at the right time. Searching for evidence for research tasks Evaluating credibility of sources Consider, tone, style, audience, and purpose to determine the credibility of a source. Culture Culture

https://www.google.com/intl/en-us/insidesearch/searcheducation/lessons.html

Related:  Week 6: Google: A Deeper Dive (*=Key reading)Information literacy

How Does Google Work? Learn How Google Works: Search Engine + AdWords The following infographic was created years ago when Google had a content-first focus on search. In the years since then, the rise of mobile devices has caused Google to shift to a user-first approach to search. We created a newer infographic to reflect the modern search landscape here. Vote on Hacker News, or Bookmark this on Delicious How fake news can exploit pictures to make people believe lies Updated Thu at 2:52amThu 22 Nov 2018, 2:52am True or false? Giraffes are the only mammals that can't jump. According to a growing body of evidence, there are factors pushing you to rate that claim as true — and they have nothing to do zoology, biology, or general knowledge. It comes down to the fact the claim is presented alongside a generic photograph.

Great Digital Lessons Looking for Controversy In building great digital lessons, the sample items suggest the importance of finding issues that are controversial and might inspire a reasonable difference of opinion. The sources in these items usually present a mix of arguments and evidence that could support at least two different positions. In fact, they tend to push students into being for or against something like public art or a law governing the access of service animals to restaurants. They must pick and then defend one side or another.

How to Write Lesson Plans .. adapted from Writing Lesson Plans from the Huntington College Education Department Madeline Hunter's (Seven Steps) Anticipatory Set (setting the stage)--attention-getter and focuser Statement of Objectives--tell students what they'll be able to do as a result of the lesson Instructional Input--lecture, but not necessarily lecture: demo, explanation, instructions Modeling--demonstrate, show what you tell Check for Understanding--watch faces, ask questions Guided Practice--help students start practicing new skills, applying new knowledge Independent Practice--turn them loose to work on their own, homework assignment, etc. Example

Musings about librarianship: 6 common misconceptions when doing advanced Google Searching As librarians we are often called upon to teach not just library databases but also Google and Google Scholar. Unlike teaching other search tools, teaching Google is often tricky because unlike library databases where we can have insider access through our friendly product support representative as librarians we have no more or no less insight into Google which is legendary for being secretive. Still, given that Google has become synonymous with search we should be decently good at teaching it. I've noticed though, often when people teach Google, particularly advanced searching of Google, they fall prey to 2 main types of errors.

Lateral Reading: A How-To Information literacy librarians (correctly) teach students to evaluate the websites they use for papers and other academic purposes by looking at features such as the site’s domain, its appearance, who the author is, etc. These are necessary steps, but there are increasing calls for evaluation to be broader. Mike Caulfield’s Web Literacy for Student Fact Checkers, for example, encourages “lateral reading,” an approach that involves reading “about” a website or other source in addition to reading and analyzing the source itself. Lateral reading of a website involves a short scan of the site followed by researching its ownership and what other sources say the site to help decide whether the information there can be trusted or not. An in-depth look at how to perform lateral reading is offered in “Lateral Reading and the Nature of Expertise: Reading Less and Learning More When Evaluating Digital Information.”

Random Acts of Kindness Reading. Writing. Arithmetic. They’re the so-called ‘three Rs’ – and they’re supposed to be the key to the success of our kids. But what about the skills that really matter? Results on ReadWriteThink Find content from Thinkfinity Partners using a visual bookmarking and sharing tool. More Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Results from ReadWriteThink 1-10 of 892 Results from ReadWriteThink *Control Alt Achieve: Hipster Google - 21 Google Tools You Probably Never Heard Of Google is well know for certain tools and services - Search, Gmail, Calendar, Drive, Docs, Slides, Sheets, Maps, Chrome, and such. These are all powerful and useful tools that are transforming teaching and learning in schools around the world. However, in addition to those tools, Google has also created a wide range of services, apps, extensions, features, and other tools that are not as well known. Even though these tools may not be as popular or as widely known, they are still very useful in school settings.

How fake news gets into our minds, and what you can do to resist it Although the term itself is not new, fake news presents a growing threat for societies across the world. Only a small amount of fake news is needed to disrupt a conversation, and at extremes it can have an impact on democratic processes, including elections. Read more: We made deceptive robots to see why fake news spreads, and found a weakness But what can we do to avoid fake news, at a time when we could be waiting a while for mainstream media and social networks to step up and address the problem?

Related: