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6 Active Learning Spaces Your Library Should Have

6 Active Learning Spaces Your Library Should Have
Active Learning Spaces In the book Get Active: Reimagining Learning Spaces for Student Success, the authors identify six types of active learning spaces that are essential for creating an engaging learning environment for students. While this research (and this book) are not specifically focused on school libraries, we are the ideal place in our schools to encompass all six types of learning spaces in one location. We are the learning hubs of our schools after all. :) You might find that many of these spaces will overlap in your library, or that their purpose might shift depending on the day. That’s totally normal considering how flexible our spaces have to be. Aim for having all six areas available as much as possible. Small group areas In your library, make sure that you have areas available where small groups of students can meet, talk and brainstorm. Large group areas By default, most school libraries already have a large group area. Community Area Technology rich area Makerspaces

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10 Very Good Tools for Student Researchers January 27, 2016 One of the onerous parts in essay and academic writing is the bibliography section. Managing, organizing and citing references can sometimes be a real challenge especially if you don't keep track of what and who you cite. The last thing you want after a strenuous writing task is a messy bibliography with one reference missing a page number, the other needs publication date or, worse of all, having to go back to your sources to check for the source of that quotation you included in your conclusion.

Favorite Halloween Read Alouds - Elementary Librarian Have I mentioned that I love fall? The weather is gorgeous here in Kentucky with a beautiful blue sky almost every day, and the temperature is in the 70s most days. It's football season (which is good and bad news around here), and Halloween is just around the corner. Halloween is one of my favorite holidays, so I thought I'd share some of my favorite Halloween read alouds and chapter book recommendations with you.

Not all praise privately run public libraries By Shinya Machida / Yomiuri Shimbun Staff WriterPublic libraries, great sources of knowledge, are undergoing radical change. As the outsourcing of library management continues, interested parties are debating how to balance such concerns as making public libraries more convenient and effectively selecting and arranging books. Outsourcing continues The first floor of the Ebina City Library in Kanagawa Prefecture contains a cafe and an area selling books and magazines, while an eye-catching area on the second floor contains a space for lifestyle-related books on such topics as cooking and travel.

It's Annual Report Season! Here Are Some Tips To Help You Effectively Tell Your Story. At this time of year, many teacher librarians are working to compile an annual report: that is to say a 2-3 page summary of how their work made a difference for students and staff all year long. As someone who has crafted more than one of these babies, I understand and appreciate the work that goes into the shiny final products. Further, I know that the most effective annual reports are not simply collections of data pulled together at the last minute. The most stunning and impressive examples are intentionally and methodically crafted all year long. In other words, if you're only just now thinking about doing an annual report, the bad news is that you're probably too late for this year. HOWEVER, the good news is, you're just in time to get a jump start on one for next year!

6 Online Resources for Keeping Up with Library Trends » LibraryScienceDegree.org As a professional or student, one of the most important skills to hone is maintaining a working knowledge of library trends and issues. Whether your focus is special libraries, academic libraries, or the public sphere, employers want to ensure that potential hires can keep up with developments in the field. If you have already secured a professional position, you may already understand how the livelihood of libraries relies largely upon this knowledge. How can you ensure that you don’t fall behind?

Teacher Resources The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations. Discover and discuss ways to bring the power of Library of Congress primary sources into the classroom. Go to the blog Subscribe to the blog via e-mail or RSS.

Love letters to libraries: Robin Ince, Meg Rosoff and other famous names check in In 1971 Marguerite Hart, a children’s librarian in the city of Troy, Michigan, asked public figures to write to local children about why their new library was important. She wrote wide and dreamed big, sending requests all over the world to artists, writers, politicians – even pontiffs – and what came back was a veritable who’s-who in history: Dr Seuss, Pope Paul VI, Neil Armstrong, Kingsley Amis and Isaac Asimov responded, to name but a few of the 97. 45 years later and half a world away, the letters were noticed by the Arts Council England this year, who contacted the Troy Public Library about doing something similar to mark National Libraries Day in the UK.

SLJ’s School Ebook Market Directory Ebook providers offer different selections of titles with varying terms. Which ones will best meet your school’s needs and budget? School Library Journal’s snapshot of 19 ebook vendors outlines the suppliers’ range of offerings, terms of use, and pricing options. Do you want to buy your ebooks outright, or lease them? What kinds of discounts are available? Can students download e-content onto their personal devices or read offline?

PowerUp / HISD -The Future is Now Technology—Students and staff must have equitable access to the latest technology, tools, infrastructure, and cyber safety guidelines to support digital-age instruction, collaboration, and the development of 21st-century skills. Part of this effort includes the district’s one-to-one laptop program, which will provide every high school student with a laptop to use for learning at school and at home by 2016. The “HUB”—A digital teaching and learning platform that will eventually become the hub of collaboration, curriculum, instruction, and communication for HISD staff, students, and parents. When fully implemented in 2015-2016, the “HUB” will allow all HISD educators to create and share instructional resources and assignments, enable students to tailor their classes to their own personal learning profile, and allow parents to track their children’s progress.

8 Modern YA Novels to Pair With Classroom Classics The school year is winding down, which means that teens (young people of any age, really) can finally give the classics a rest and dive instead into the young adult novels that really reflect what it’s like to grow up today. Not so fast, though: Lots of YA books, for all their fantastical plot elements and contemporary detail (in at least one of these novels, witches and iPods are never far apart), address some of the same themes the classics do, including race, female sexuality, mental illness, and obviously enough, love. In honor of the classics, YA, and the joy of reading of both together, we’ve rounded up eight of the most-taught books in America and paired them with contemporary reads that tread the same, timeless territory. Classic: Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare YA Equivalent: The Fault in Our Stars

Good resources for library website design I recently spoke to a local library co-op about designing user-centered library websites. In this post I thought I’d share the list of resources I compiled as part of that presentation. Below are some sites, blogs, books, articles, and tools that I have found useful in my own web design projects. They are organized into four areas: Usability – general usability resources.Library website design – resources for public and academic site design.Mobile site design – resources for library mobile site design.Accessibility – resources for designing for visually impaired users. Getting to E: The State of the School Ebook Market Illustration by Ken Orvidas. By fits and starts, school libraries are moving toward ebook adoption; the question is how fast. While publishers and distributors are evolving their offerings to appeal to students and educators, the transition to ebooks has its challenges, ranging from inadequate technology to some students’ preference for print books.

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