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Videos

Videos
Creative Commons Kiwi This short and fun animation video by Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand explains the CC licenses. A Shared Culture A high-level overview of the goals of Creative Commons and how we are “saving the world from failed sharing.” Created by Jesse Dylan, director of the “Yes We Can” video. Wanna Work Together? Wanna Work Together? Building on the Past The winner of our Moving Images Contest, Justin Cone created a short, succinct “commercial” that demonstrates what Creative Commons is, and how it works, in a slick package. Reticulum Rex This film describes some of CC’s success stories and gives insight into where we’re headed. CC Brasil In the spring of 2004, a documentary film crew followed Creative Commons staff to Brazil. Mix Tape Sheryl Seibert’s video about found art and remix culture was the second place winner of the Moving Images Contest. Berkman Panel (Dec 2008) Sharing Creative Works This isn’t a video, but it fits the spirit of this section.

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CC0 You are using a tool for freeing your own work of copyright restrictions around the world. You may use this tool even if your work is free of copyright in some jurisdictions, if you want to ensure it is free everywhere. Creative Commons does not recommend this tool for works that are already in the public domain worldwide, instead use the Public Domain Mark for such works. Using CC0, you can waive all copyrights and related or neighboring rights that you have over your work, such as your moral rights (to the extent waivable), your publicity or privacy rights, rights you have protecting against unfair competition, and database rights and rights protecting the extraction, dissemination and reuse of data. Keep in mind that you cannot waive rights to a work that you do not own unless you have permission from the owner.

Understanding Creative Commons Pt 2 This post and the previous post are a draft of an article I've been asked to write for a school library magazine on Creative Commons. I'm sharing the draft here hoping readers will add suggestions for clarification, additions, or other sorts of improvements. If you can't take advantage of your readers, just who can you take advantage of? I look forward to your comments.

14 Websites To Find Free Creative Commons Music We’ve introduced you to a variety of quality image sites where you can find Creative Commons images, but the Creative Commons license goes far beyond just images. Different types of content are licensed online using Creative Commons — videos, music, and even blog content. You’ll find plenty of it online to share, remix and use commercially. When it comes to Creative Commons music — there are certainly no shortage of websites with audio you can use for any occasion. With Creative Commons licenses, you do have to be sure to take a careful look at the specific license which will show you exactly how you can use the content that has been provided for free.

About CC0 — “No Rights Reserved” CC0 enables scientists, educators, artists and other creators and owners of copyright- or database-protected content to waive those interests in their works and thereby place them as completely as possible in the public domain, so that others may freely build upon, enhance and reuse the works for any purposes without restriction under copyright or database law. In contrast to CC’s licenses that allow copyright holders to choose from a range of permissions while retaining their copyright, CC0 empowers yet another choice altogether – the choice to opt out of copyright and database protection, and the exclusive rights automatically granted to creators – the “no rights reserved” alternative to our licenses. The Problem Dedicating works to the public domain is difficult if not impossible for those wanting to contribute their works for public use before applicable copyright or database protection terms expire.

Understanding Creative Commons Pt 1 This post and the next is a draft of an article I've been asked to write for a school library magazine on Creative Commons. I'm sharing the draft here hoping readers will add suggestions for clarification, additions, or other sorts of improvements. If you can't take advantage of your readers, just who can you take advantage of? I look forward to your comments. Thanks - Doug

2012 Communicating Digital Humanities Across and Beyond the Disciplines Editor: Julianne Nyhan Front Matter It is time to address the Public Communication of DHJulianne Nyhan, UCL Creative Commons - YouTube Help Creative Commons licenses provide a standard way for content creators to grant someone else permission to use their work. YouTube allows users to mark their videos with a Creative Commons CC BY license. These videos are then accessible to YouTube users for use, even commercially, in their own videos via the YouTube Video Editor.

Howitworks Comic1 Log in / create account (OpenID) Howitworks Comic1 page 1 of 4 CDRH Articles and Resources Recommendations for Digital Humanities Projects The Center for Digital Research in the Humanities (CDRH) recommends that digital research projects be based on international standards. Standards-based projects stand a greater chance of interoperating with similar sites, and are more likely to migrate successfully into new computing environments as file formats and standards change. Examples of standard practices may include use of: Extensible Markup Language (XML) for encoding content; the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) as an application of XML for encoding textual content; adoption of non-proprietary data file formats; XQuery-based searches of XML content; and the use of open-source database and web publishing frameworks. A common early phase of digital research may involve building a Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) prototype to serve as an illustration or proof of concept.

Creative Commons Many Flickr users have chosen to offer their work under a Creative Commons license, and you can browse or search through content under each type of license. Here are some recently added bits and pieces: Attribution License » 74,571,326 photos (See more) Attribution-NoDerivs License » 21,541,411 photos (See more)

Content Directories Welcome to the Content Directories The following is a list of organizations and projects powered with Creative Commons licenses. Since Creative Commons does not maintain a database of content and does not store content, we would like CC-community members to help build a directory of projects to help spread the word about CC — hence the CC Content Directories wiki! National Jukebox LOC.gov WARNING: Historical recordings may contain offensive language. Read the disclaimer Now Playing... Elk's reunion march Le parlate d'amor El teléfono a larga distancia At the jazz band ball Everybody's jazzin' it Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag and smile, smile, smile! View This Playlist

About The Licenses Our public copyright licenses incorporate a unique and innovative “three-layer” design. Each license begins as a traditional legal tool, in the kind of language and text formats that most lawyers know and love. We call this the Legal Code layer of each license. But since most creators, educators, and scientists are not in fact lawyers, we also make the licenses available in a format that normal people can read — the Commons Deed (also known as the “human readable” version of the license). The Commons Deed is a handy reference for licensors and licensees, summarizing and expressing some of the most important terms and conditions.

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