background preloader

Sagor och ramsor

Sagor och ramsor

http://www.ungafakta.se/sagor/

Related:  Sagor fabler och myter en/svNovell

Myths, Folktales, and Fairy Tales Overview Students learn about a genre through participation in a variety of online activities. By interviewing accomplished genre writers and storytellers, taking part in online writing activities, and using interactive technology tools, students delve into the history, meaning, and cultural importance of each distinct genre. NOTE: Please be aware that there may be potentially objectionable material in some traditional myths. In order for ancient cultures to make sense of their worlds, which were often hostile, they sometimes incorporated violent elements in their stories. Just Color! ~ Free Coloring Printables <font face="Tahoma, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" style="" class="size12 Tahoma12"><a target="_blank" href=" | <a target="_self" href="/ForTots.html">For Tots</a> | <a target="_self" href="/index.html">Home</a> | <a target="_self" href="/ForBigKids.html">For Big Kids</a> | <a target="_self" href="/Store.html">Store</a> | <a target="_self" href="/RaisingRockStars.html">Raising Rock Stars</a></font> All material provided on this website, 1plus1plus1equals1.com is copyright protected @import url( Custom Search I have kids who love to color, so I began making free coloring printables in theme packs for them, and for you!

10 Reasons Why Kids Need to Read Non-Disney Fairy Tales Say “fairy tales” and your mind likely flashes to Disney and its animated versions of children’s classics. But old-school fairy tales — stories by authors such as Hans Christian Andersen, Oscar Wilde, Sophie, Comtesse de Ségur, or Andrew Lang — are filled with a richness and complexity that is often missing from their big-screen renderings. Here are ten reasons it’s worth reading the original stories with your young reader. 1. Life LessonsRemember the line from The Princess Bride: “I do not think it means what you think it means”?

Fairy Tale Autobiographies ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade The Selfish Giant (Oscar Wilde) One of most beautiful and famous fairy tales by Oscar Wild. The story of a grumpy selfish giant and a little boy who teaches him about a happy life and an eternal spring. An inspirational story to make you think about how you are running your life. If you want to see it with subtitles, make sure you activate YouTube subtitles on the video.

Hans Christian Andersen: The Wild Swans by AR away in the land to which the swallows fly when it is winter, dwelt a king who had eleven sons, and one daughter, named Eliza. The eleven brothers were princes, and each went to school with a star on his breast, and a sword by his side. They wrote with diamond pencils on gold slates, and learnt their lessons so quickly and read so easily that every one might know they were princes. Their sister Eliza sat on a little stool of plate-glass, and had a book full of pictures, which had cost as much as half a kingdom. Oh, these children were indeed happy, but it was not to remain so always.

The Little Match Girl by Hans Christian Andersen Most terribly cold it was; it snowed, and was nearly quite dark, and evening-- the last evening of the year. In this cold and darkness there went along the street a poor little girl, bareheaded, and with naked feet. When she left home she had slippers on, it is true; but what was the good of that? Myths, Folktales, and Fairy Tales Home Welcome to the Myths, Folktales and Fairy Tales Internet project. We've compiled contributions from many authors to create this rich resource for learning about and writing in these genres. During the project, we will have several authors live online to discuss their work in these genres and to answer questions from young writers working on creating their own. When we read these traditional stories from around the world, we find that the things we value most highly, fear most deeply, and hope for most ardently are valued, feared and hoped for by all people.

Fairy Tales Gone Wild: 10 Creative Ways to Teach Fairy Tales Fractured fairy tales are a great way to help students see how story elements—like character, plot, setting—shape the stories we read and write. What do we call it when an author takes a classic fairy tale and changes it into something completely different? It's called a fractured fairy tale. And kids love them. "It's by far my students' favorite language arts unit every year," writes teacher Jessie Averson, a second grade teacher in Tennessee. We asked teachers across the country for their favorite tips on teaching fractured fairy tales. Explore Grecian Lore and Legend with this Informative Teacher's Guide! Valuable aspects of any literary work are its themes, symbols, and motifs. Part of the Common Core ELA standards is to introduce and explain these complex concepts. However, abstract ideas are often difficult for students to anatomize without assistance. Using a storyboard, students can visually demonstrate their understanding of these concepts, and master analysis of literary elements.

The Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling, read by Tim Bulkeley "The Just So Stories for Little Children" were written by Rudyard Kipling. They are fabulous origin stories and are among his best known, and arguably best, works. How the Whale got his Throat (reasonable quality 1.72MB) Words to the Wise: Aesop's Fables Interactive Book The Aesop for Children interactive book is designed to be enjoyed by readers of any age. The book contains over 140 classic fables, accompanied by beautiful illustrations and interactive animations. "Aesop's Fables"—also called "the Aesopica"—are a collection of stories designed to teach moral lessons credited to Aesop, a Greek slave and story-teller thought to have lived between 620 and 560 BCE. Aesop's fables are some of the most well known in the world and have been translated in multiple languages and become popular in dozens of cultures through the course of five centuries. They have been told and retold in a variety of media, from oral tradition to written storybooks to stage, film and animated cartoon versions—even in architecture.

Related: