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*How To Help Every Child Fulfil Their Potential (Dweck's growth vs. fixed mindset)

*How To Help Every Child Fulfil Their Potential (Dweck's growth vs. fixed mindset)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yl9TVbAal5s

Related:  Week 6: Managing Instruction (* = Key reading)Growth MindsetImproving Instruction / Student Engagementkarinusundbergfractions

*Robert Mager's Performance-Based Learning Objectives (useful for your Assignment 3: Critical Issues Workshop!) You don’t have to read up on learning objectives for too long before you run into the name of Robert Mager and hear about his performance-based learning objectives. These are also sometimes called three-part learning objectives or behavioral learning objectives. This isn’t necessarily the only way to write learning objectives. Smart people have continued to think about training and the development of learning objectives since Mager’s time, after all. But even though there are other schools of thought about learning objectives, what Mager had to say is still solid advice in many cases. And, as they taught us when we were kids, it’s a good idea to get the basics down before you begin experimenting (while riding bikes, they taught us to ride normally before going with no hands; while playing baseball, they taught us to throw a fastball before trying a curve; while writing, they taught us to print before teaching us cursive).

How Do We Measure Social and Emotional Learning? We all know that whatever gets measured usually gets attention and focus. Right now, there is no widespread, practical way for all schools to assess children's social-emotional skills and character development (SECD). Or is there? If one looks at student report cards, one often finds on "the other side" of the academic grades a set of comments about behavior, character, preparation, motivation, and more. Teacher comments have long been provided alongside academic grades to recognize the essential role of many abilities and competencies in academic performance and future potential.

How to Approach Your Teaching Like a Master Chef Listen to my interview with John Stevens and Matt Vaudrey, or read a full transcript here. Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 51:23 — 70.9MB) Subscribe: iTunes | Android | jr.brainpop Did you click on a BrainPOP Jr. link from your My BrainPOP Timeline? Please use your computer to go to BrainPOP Jr. Make the BrainPOP Jr. Movie of the Week app part of your day in the classroom, at home or on the go! To access BrainPOP Jr.’s Movie of the Week on an Android device, iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch, download our FREE Movie of the Week app. You’ll get a different animated, educational movie – plus its related quizzes and bonus features – delivered right to your mobile device every Monday.

Composing and Decomposing Fractions CCSSM 4.NF.3b reads as follows: Decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with the same denominator in more than one way, recording each decomposition by an equation. Justify decompositions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model. Examples: 3/8 = 1/8 + 1/8 + 1/8; 3/8 = 1/8 + 2/8; 2 1/8 = 1 + 1 + 1/8 = 8/8 + 8/8 + 1/8. Here’s a little fraction activity that can move your kiddos in the right direction toward that understanding. Be sure to provide manipulative support (concrete) and have students record their work with a model (representational).

*Why Ownership? ( Hilda K. Weisburg) Although it’s been around for a while, “ownership” has become one of the latest buzz words. It has always been important for you as a leader to own your library program, but there are others who need ownership as well. Owning leads to lifelong learning for students, and involvement and investment in your program from teachers and administrators. Consider the difference in renting or owning a home.

Resources on Developing Resilience, Grit, and Growth Mindset There’s been a lot of talk lately about resilience, grit, growth mindset, and related concepts -- including the social and emotional skills associated with these factors and their importance for student well-being and academic success. Edutopia has curated these lists of resources to help educators and parents follow these topics and create home and school environments that provide supports and opportunities to help young people thrive. Nurturing Resilience

Enliven Class Discussions With Gallery Walks Students routinely talking with each other should be a staple in classrooms. We know this as teachers. Social development theory (and I’m sure plenty of your own observational data) backs up the benefits of it. Skolverket om betyg, april 2016 Upload Malin Frykman Loading...

Fractions on a Number Line with Cuisenaire Rods A couple of days ago, I blogged about equivalent fractions, and I promised a follow-up post about fractions on the number line. We’ve been using lots of different representations for fractions, including pattern blocks, Cuisenaire rods, and fraction tiles to explore fractions. To introduce fractions on a number line, we wanted to use a familiar manipulative, Cuisenaire rods, to help the students make a connection between fractions as parts of a whole and fractions on a number line. I wanted to introduce an element of problem solving, so I didn’t want to direct teach the concept. Instead, I wanted to see if the students could use what they already knew about fractions to develop their own understanding of fractions on a number line. Students were given the reproducible shown below and set of rods to work with.

A List Of 50+ Teaching Strategies To Jumpstart Your Teacher Brain Teaching strategies are among the most important ingredients for highly-effective learning environments. In addition to literacy strategies, approaches to assessment, and grouping strategies (among many others), knowing the right teaching strategy for the right academic situation may not be a matter of expertise or training, but memory: out of sight, out of mind, yes? Which makes the following infographic from fortheteachers.org useful.

Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives “If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve,” Debbie Millman counseled in one of the best commencement speeches ever given, urging: “Do what you love, and don’t stop until you get what you love. Work as hard as you can, imagine immensities…” Far from Pollyanna platitude, this advice actually reflects what modern psychology knows about how belief systems about our own abilities and potential fuel our behavior and predict our success. Much of that understanding stems from the work of Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, synthesized in her remarkably insightful Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (public library) — an inquiry into the power of our beliefs, both conscious and unconscious, and how changing even the simplest of them can have profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives.

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