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A Teacher's Guide to Differentiating Instruction

A Teacher's Guide to Differentiating Instruction
Introduction Does effectively teaching 30 students in one classroom require teachers to develop 30 lessons, one tailor-made for each student? Or should teachers “aim for the middle” and hope to reach most students in a given lesson? The answer is not simple. While most would agree it is impractical to try to individualize every lesson for every child, research has shown that teaching to the middle is ineffective. It ignores the needs of advanced students, often leaving them unchallenged and bored, while it intimidates and confuses lower functioning learners. What is Differentiation? Simply stated, differentiation is modified instruction that helps students with diverse academic needs and learning styles master the same challenging academic content. How to Start Four planning steps set the stage for effective differentiated instruction. Vary Materials Nonfiction and fiction, written at a variety of reading levels. Vary Process Vary Assessment Conclusion References Good, M. View Full Article

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Curriculum differentiation - Schools Plus - The Department of Education Ideas on adjusting the curriculum to meet the needs of all students Schools Plus would like to acknowledge that the information listed below is a body of knowledge that has been collected from a variety of sources - teachers, workshops, classrooms and schools. Set achievable tasks providing regular feedback throughout the activity Teach the student to organize themselves by listing tasks to be done and when they are due. A visual system for younger students, a diary for older students.

Differentiated Instruction for English Language Learners Home > ELL Topics from A to Z > Differentiated Instruction for English Language Learners By: Karen Ford (2011) Each student comes to school, not only with unique academic needs, but also with unique background experiences, culture, language, personality, interests, and attitudes toward learning. Effective teachers recognize that all of these factors affect how students learn in the classroom, and they adjust, or differentiate, their instruction to meet students' needs. Getting Started Tomlinson and Imbeau (2010) describe differentiation as creating a balance between academic content and students' individual needs.

Differentiated programming Students are individuals who learn at different rates and in different ways. These individual differences may influence how students respond to instruction and how they demonstrate what they know, understand and can do. Individual differences may include: cognitive abilities, including students’ current level of understanding and ability in relation to a particular topic or skillprior learning experienceslearning styles and preferencesmotivation and engagement with learninginterests and talents. Through differentiated planning and programming, teachers can consider students’ varying abilities, learning styles, interests and needs.

Are Teachers of Tomorrow Prepared to Use Innovative Tech? Getty Images With a new generation of teachers coming into the work force, there’s a discrepancy between what principals expect of teachers-in-training and what they’re actually learning in school. A new Project Tomorrow report surveying principals concluded that they want to hire new teachers with creative ideas about how technology can be leveraged to create authentic and differentiated learning experiences. Empowering Student Relationships With Media Debates over children and media use are nothing new, but the technologies by which children primarily interact with media have changed significantly. Most guidelines related to "screen time" were developed when television was the dominant media, but new technologies are making us question the value of older research. In its most recent report on the subject, the American Academy of Pediatrics makes reference to "important positive and prosocial effects of media use," and a call for expanding media education programs in schools. While more dedicated media education in schools would be great, it is little more than a pipe dream in the current climate of low budgets and high-stake tests. It is therefore incumbent on individual educators to help students interact with media in ways that are critical and empowering.

The How To's of Planning Lessons Differentiated by Learning Profile Figure 10.1. Focus on Learning Profile Learning-Style Preferences Learning style refers to environmental or personal factors. Some students may learn best when they can move around, others need to sit still. Some students enjoy a room with lots to look at, color, things to touch and try out.

How to Make a Rubric for Differentiation Rubrics are "rules" or a way to explicitly lay out expectations for an assignment, and the means to evaluate or grade an assignment using a point system. Rubrics work very well for differentiated instruction, as you can establish different levels of performance for general education students and for children receiving special education services. As you start making your rubric, think about the things you need to know to assess a student's performance on a project/paper/group effort. You need to create four or more categories to evaluate, and then establish the criteria for each score. You can format your rubric as a questionnaire, or as a chart. Be sure it is clearly written, as you want to give it to your students and review it as you introduce the assignment.

Methods of Differentiation in the Classroom It’s a term that every teacher has heard during their training: differentiation. Differentiation is defined by the Training and Development Agency for Schools as ‘the process by which differences between learners are accommodated so that all students in a group have the best possible chance of learning’. In recent decades it has come to be considered a key skill for any teacher, especially those of mixed-ability classes. But what does it really mean? What is meant by ‘differences between learners’? In a large class, differences between students may on the face of it seem too numerous to be quantified, but differentiation works on 3 key aspects which can be summed up as follows:

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