background preloader

ENCHANTED LEARNING HOME PAGE

ENCHANTED LEARNING HOME PAGE
Advertisement. (Already a member? Click here.) Enchanted Learning - Home Page Enchanted Learning®Over 35,000 Web PagesSample Pages for Prospective Subscribers, or click below Click to read our Privacy Policy

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/Home.html

ELC Study Zone About the Study Zone The Study Zone is for students of the English Language Centre (ELC) at the University of Victoria. ELC teachers create the English language lessons and practice exercises. The site is designed for our adult English language learners, but all are welcome to read the lessons and use the exercises. News and Feedback We occasionally post news on the Study Zone blog and we're happy to receive comments on the blog's Feedback Page. Resources for Teachers Skip to main content Create interactive lessons using any digital content including wikis with our free sister product TES Teach. Get it on the web or iPad! guest Join | Help | Sign In cooltoolsforschools Home

UDL Goal Setter: Tools & Activities: Teaching Every Student The key to helping all students achieve is identifying and removing barriers from our teaching methods and curriculum materials. One effective way to do this is to expand your teaching toolbox with digital media and software. To accommodate a broad spectrum of learners, universally designed curricula require a range of options for accessing, using, and engaging with learning materials. Learning Centers in the Classroom Poptropica Teaching GuidesPoptropica is one of the Internet's most popular sites for kids—and now it's available as an app for the iPad! It's not just a place to play games; each of the islands featured on the site provides a learning opportunity. Check out our teaching guides to four of Poptropica's islands: 24 Carrot Island, Time Tangled Island, Mystery Train Island, and Mythology Island. May Calendar of Events May is full of holidays and events that you can incorporate into your standard curriculum. Our Educators' Calendar outlines activities for each event, including: National Music Week (5/4-11), Cinco de Mayo (5/5), Teacher Appreciation Week (5/5-9), School Nurse Day (5/7), Mother's Day (5/11), National Police Week (5/11-17), Transportation Week (5/11-17), Children's Book Week (5/12-18), International Museum Day (5/18), and Memorial Day (5/26). Plus, celebrate Asian-Pacific-American History Month, Physical Fitness & Sports Month all May long!

UDL Examples and Resources Disclaimer: The examples and resources highlighted on these pages have been gathered for educational purposes. CAST does not necessarily endorse the products listed, nor does their inclusion here mean that these products are complete expressions of the UDL principles and guidelines. They may illustrate certain principles and not others. Search lessons by keyword Jeopardy [SMART Notebook lesson] A jeopardy game template to be used for a chapter review, or end of year testing review. It takes a while to g... Subject: Special Education, Mathematics, Other, Social Studies, English Language Arts, Science, Health and Physical Education, Art and Design, Citizenship, Modern Foreign Languages, Geography, History, Cross-curricular, ICT, English as a Second Language, Music Grade: Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3, Grade 4, Grade 5, Grade 6, Grade 7, Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12, Post-Secondary Submitted by: Harvey

Before We Flip Classrooms, Let's Rethink What We're Flipping To Integrated into their regular math classes, Globaloria students access online video tutorials and receive expert advice on how to build original educational video games about math topics. Photo credit: World Wide Workshop We're hearing a lot of talk about education in these back-to-school days, but a few conversations rise above the din. One such is the chatter about "flipped classrooms,"1 in which students listen to lectures at home and do homework at school.

50 Important Links for Common Core Educators Educators across the nation are working hard this summer to begin developing updated curricula that will fit into the new Common Core State Standards, which will be fully applied in 45 U.S. states (Texas, Alaska, Nebraska, Virginia, and Minnesota have opted out of statewide participation) by 2015. Yet despite the hubbub about the new standards, which were created as a means of better equipping students with the knowledge they need to be competitive in the modern world, many teachers still have a lot of unanswered questions about what Common Core will mean for them, their students, and their schools. Luckily, the Internet abounds with helpful resources that can explain the intricacies of Common Core, offer resources for curriculum development, and even let teachers keep up with the latest news on the subject. We’ve collected just a few of those great resources here, which are essential reads for any K-12 educator in a Common Core-adopting state. Groups and Organizations

ARKive - Discover the world's most endangered species Wildscreen's Arkive project was launched in 2003 and grew to become the world's biggest encyclopaedia of life on Earth. With the help of over 7,000 of the world’s best wildlife filmmakers and photographers, conservationists and scientists, Arkive.org featured multi-media fact-files for more than 16,000 endangered species. Freely accessible to everyone, over half a million people every month, from over 200 countries, used Arkive to learn and discover the wonders of the natural world.

The Times and the Common Core Standards: Reading Strategies for 'Informational Text' Update | Sept. 2012: We’ll be exploring the new Common Core State Standards, and how teaching with The Times can address them, through a series of blog posts. You can find them all here, in the lesson plan category “Common Core.” Forty-four states and United States territories have adopted the Common Core Standards and, according to this recent Times article, one major change teachers can expect to see is more emphasis on reading “informational,” or nonfiction, texts across subject areas: While English classes will still include healthy amounts of fiction, the standards say that students should be reading more nonfiction texts as they get older, to prepare them for the kinds of material they will read in college and careers. In the fourth grade, students should be reading about the same amount from “literary” and “informational” texts, according to the standards; in the eighth grade, 45 percent should be literary and 55 percent informational, and by 12th grade, the split should be 30/70.

Kelly Gallagher – Resources Part of the reason my students have such a hard time reading is because they bring little prior knowledge and background to the written page. They can decode the words, but the words remain meaningless without a foundation of knowledge. To help build my students’ prior knowledge, I assign them an "Article of the Week" every Monday morning. By the end of the school year I want them to have read 35 to 40 articles about what is going on in the world.

Need Content? Just Google It! « Common Core I teach in a school that typifies skills-based education. We practice project based learning, utilize the latest technology, and hold to a mission of helping our students acquire “21st century skills.” We work diligently to replace traditional classroom norms with those of corporate culture so that our students will someday thrive in an increasingly competitive global marketplace — a new world demanding innovation, collaboration, and critical thinking.

Common Core. ORG Building on the best of existing state standards, the Common Core State Standards provide clear and consistent learning goals to help prepare students for college, career, and life. The standards clearly demonstrate what students are expected to learn at each grade level, so that every parent and teacher can understand and support their learning. The standards are: Research and evidence basedClear, understandable, and consistentAligned with college and career expectationsBased on rigorous content and the application of knowledge through higher-order thinking skillsBuilt upon the strengths and lessons of current state standardsInformed by other top-performing countries to prepare all students for success in our global economy and society According to the best available evidence, the mastery of each standard is essential for success in college, career, and life in today’s global economy. For grades K-8, grade-by-grade standards exist in English language arts/literacy and mathematics.

Related: