background preloader

A Complete Guide to Flexbox

Background The Flexbox Layout (Flexible Box) module (a W3C Candidate Recommendation as of October 2017) aims at providing a more efficient way to lay out, align and distribute space among items in a container, even when their size is unknown and/or dynamic (thus the word “flex”). The main idea behind the flex layout is to give the container the ability to alter its items’ width/height (and order) to best fill the available space (mostly to accommodate to all kind of display devices and screen sizes). A flex container expands items to fill available free space or shrinks them to prevent overflow. Most importantly, the flexbox layout is direction-agnostic as opposed to the regular layouts (block which is vertically-based and inline which is horizontally-based). While those work well for pages, they lack flexibility (no pun intended) to support large or complex applications (especially when it comes to orientation changing, resizing, stretching, shrinking, etc.). Basics & Terminology display

https://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/a-guide-to-flexbox/

Related:  HTML/CSSFlexboxWebdesign_2019FLEXBOXCSS-Tricks

Flexy Boxes — CSS flexbox playground and code generation tool Flexbox browser support Three versions of the flexbox spec – each with different syntax – have been implemented in browsers. The two 2012 specs are roughly equivilant in terms of features, differing mainly in syntax. The earlier 2009 spec is less comprehensive though covers a lot of the same ground. Flexbox 2012 — W3C Candidate Recommendation, September 2012 Opera 12.1+, Firefox 22+. Chrome 21 -webkit- Flexbox early 2012 — W3C Working Draft, 22 March 2012 Internet Explorer 10 -ms- Flexbox 2009 — W3C Working Draft, 23 July 2009 Firefox 2+ -moz-, Chrome 4+ -webkit-, Safari 3.1+ -webkit-. iOS Safari 3.2+ -webkit-

Flexbox — Fast Track to Layout Nirvana? Introduction HTML and CSS is a great content delivery mechanism in many ways — it is easy to learn, flexible and powerful. One thing however that it has never excelled at is complex layouts. If you want to create a simple typographic essay layout with a floated image or two, then fine, but producing complicated multi column layouts has always been fiddly and hackish, and frustrating to get working consistently and precisely across browsers. We usually tend to abuse floats and other constructs for this purpose, and bugs and rendering differences can really spoil your fun. To combat this, CSS3 includes a number of modules that exist to made different layout tasks much easier.

Fear of failure: Part 2 – Total failure In my last post, Fear of Failure: Part 1, I discussed the sad epidemic of fear of failure that I find to be rampant in America and that I see frequently in the young ski racers with whom I work. I have discovered a new wrinkle to the fear-of-failure phenomenon that brings greater clarity to the problems that young racers face in our increasingly intense, result-oriented ski racing world. Let me begin by describing what I believe lies at the heart of fear of failure, namely that every bad race is perceived by racers as an attack on their value as a person. This statement is powerful and truly harmful. Moreover, this perception is entirely disconnected from reality; it’s simply not true.

Notes on Using ARIA in HTML 2.1 First rule of ARIA use If you can use a native HTML element [HTML51] or attribute with the semantics and behaviour you require already built in, instead of re-purposing an element and adding an ARIA role, state or property to make it accessible, then do so. Under what circumstances may this not be possible? A blog about Inkscape, SVG, and other worldly matters… The SVG Working Group had a four day face-to-face meeting in Sydney this month. Like last year, the first day was a joint meeting with the CSS Working Group. I would like to thank all the people that donated to Inkscape’s SVG Standards Work fund as well as to the Inkscape general fund that made my attendance possible. Joint CSS and SVG Meeting A Visual Guide to CSS3 Flexbox Properties The Flexbox Layout officially called CSS Flexible Box Layout Module is new layout module in CSS3 made to improve the items align, directions and order in the container even when they are with dynamic or even unknown size. The prime characteristic of the flex container is the ability to modify the width or height of its children to fill the available space in the best possible way on different screen sizes. Many designers and developers find this flexbox layout easier to use, as positioning of the elements is simpler thus more complex layouts can be achieved with less code, leading to simpler development process. Flexbox layout algorithm is direction based unlike the block or inline layout which are vertically and horizontally based.

Using Flexbox: Mixing Old and New for the Best Browser Support By Chris Coyier On Flexbox is pretty awesome and is certainly part of the future of layout. The syntax has changed quite a bit over the past few years, hence the "Old" and "New" syntax. But if we weave together the old, new, and in-between syntaxes, we can get decent browser support. Especially for a simple and probably the most common use case: order-controlled grids #The HTML Ted Ligety Tops Prospects for U.S. Men’s Tech Team With the clock ticking toward Soelden, we rewind for a recap of summer and fall training This Sunday, Oct. 25, marks the official beginning of the World Cup season for the men of the U.S. Ski Team, but it really began several weeks ago. On-snow camps in Mount Hood, New Zealand and Chile — plus summer strength training at Park City’s Center of Excellence — have already served as a proving ground for the most promising racers.

Top 24 Simple, Yet Beautiful CSS3 Table Templates And Examples HTML5 offers web developers a choice of pre-built elements that can be used to extend the functionality of a website beyond the ordinary, whereas in the old days we might have had to use visual imagery to explain things better, thanks to advancements in JavaScript (jQuery), HTML5 and CSS3 — it is now possible for developers to create and style dynamic HTML5 content without the need to use heavy programming concepts. One such element that continues to help assess online data better is “table” — the table element can be used to display raw data in a selection of different appearances; tables. HTML tables are not necessarily something that everyone will be using on their websites, however they are incredibly helpful when it comes to presenting data through rows and columns, and also for organizing data and information in a more accessible way. Bootstrap CSS Bootstrap is the most famous front-end development framework on the planet, it’s being used everywhere; well, almost!

Related:  Tutorielstech reference