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List of HTTP header fields

List of HTTP header fields
HTTP header fields are components of the message header of requests and responses in the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). They define the operating parameters of an HTTP transaction. General format[edit] Field names[edit] A core set of fields is standardized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) in RFC 2616 and other updates and extension documents (e.g., RFC 4229), and must be implemented by all HTTP-compliant protocol implementations. Additional field names and permissible values may be defined by each application. The permanent registry of headers and repository of provisional registrations are maintained by the IANA. Non-standard header fields were conventionally marked by prefixing the field name with X- .[2] However, this convention became deprecated in June 2012 due to the inconveniences it caused when non-standard headers became standard.[3] A prior restriction on use of Downgraded- has also since been lifted.[4] Field values[edit] Size limits[edit] Requests[edit] [edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_HTTP_header_fields

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Hypertext Transfer Protocol The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information systems.[1] HTTP is the foundation of data communication for the World Wide Web. The standards development of HTTP was coordinated by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), culminating in the publication of a series of Requests for Comments (RFCs). The first definition of HTTP/1.1, the version of HTTP in common use, occurred in RFC 2068 in 1997, although this was obsoleted by RFC 2616 in 1999. Technical overview[edit]

Do Not Track The Do Not Track (DNT) header is the proposed HTTP header field DNT that requests that a web application disable either its tracking or cross-site user tracking (the ambiguity remains unresolved) of an individual user. The Do Not Track header was originally proposed in 2009 by researchers Christopher Soghoian, Sid Stamm, and Dan Kaminsky.[1] Efforts to standardize Do Not Track by the W3C have so far been unsuccessful.[2][3] The header field name is DNT and it currently accepts three values: 1 in case the user does not want to be tracked (opt out), 0 in case the user consents to being tracked (opt in), or null (no header sent) if the user has not expressed a preference.

An Introduction To Object Oriented CSS (OOCSS) Advertisement We explore how to craft flexible front-end design patterns and making future-proof and accessible interfaces without extra effort. Hardcover, 312 pages. Get the book now → Have you ever heard the phrase “Content is King”? DR-DOS DR-DOS (DR DOS, without hyphen up to and including v6.0) is an operating system of the DOS family, written for IBM PC-compatible personal computers. It was originally developed by Gary Kildall's Digital Research and derived from Concurrent PC DOS 6.0, which was an advanced successor of CP/M-86. As ownership changed, various later versions were produced as Novell DOS, Caldera OpenDOS, etc. SVG Attribute reference - SVG « SVG / SVG Element reference » SVG Attributes Categories Animation event attributes onbegin, onend, onload, onrepeat

WhyJython - JythonWiki Jython, lest you do not know of it, is the most compelling weapon the Java platform has for its survival into the 21st century - SeanMcGrath Why Jython There are numerous alternative languages implemented for the Java VM. The following features help to separate Jython from the rest: Toolkit — Susy 2.2.12 documentation The Susy 2.0 toolkit is built around our shorthand syntax. Use the shorthand to control every detail, and adjust your defaults on-the-fly, so you are never tied down to just one grid, or just one output style. Span [mixin]¶ Set any element to span a portion of your layout. For a floated or isolated layout, this will add necessary floats, widths, and margins. mixin

Jython Overview[edit] History[edit] In March 2008, Sun Microsystems announced the hiring of Ted Leung and Frank Wierzbicki to work on Jython and Python, similar to Sun's hiring of two JRuby developers.[2][3] Development progressed steadily,[4][5][5][6] and Jython 2.5 was released in June 2009.[7] Getting started with Grunt and Sass - Ryan Christiani - Front-End Developer - Ryan Christiani – Front-End Developer There are a lot of new tools out there to help speed up and streamline your workflow as a developer, and to be honest they can seem a bit daunting to get into. Two new tools I have started using this year were Grunt and Sass. Grunt is a commandline JavaScript Task Runner, and Sass is a Css preprocessor that lets you write more powerful css, with the use of variables, mixins/functions and nesting! Lets take a look at getting started using Grunt to compile our Sass.

Tcl Tcl (originally from Tool Command Language, but conventionally spelled "Tcl" rather than "TCL"; pronounced as "tickle" or "tee-see-ell"[3]) is a scripting language created by John Ousterhout.[4] Originally "born out of frustration",[5] according to the author, with programmers devising their own languages intended to be embedded into applications, Tcl gained acceptance on its own. It is commonly used for rapid prototyping, scripted applications, GUIs and testing. Tcl is used on embedded systems platforms, both in its full form and in several other small-footprint versions. History[edit] The Tcl programming language was created in the spring of 1988 by John Ousterhout while working at the University of California, Berkeley.[6]

24 JavaScript Best Practices for Beginners As a follow-up to "30 HTML and CSS Best Practices", this week, we'll review JavaScript! Once you've reviewed the list, be sure to let us know what little tips you've come across! JavaScript utilizes two different kinds of equality operators: === | !== and == | !

Guido van Rossum Biography[edit] Van Rossum was born and grew up in the Netherlands, where he received a masters degree in mathematics and computer science from the University of Amsterdam in 1982. He later worked for various research institutes, including the Dutch Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam, the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, Maryland, and the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), Reston, Virginia. Personal life[edit]

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