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Friday Fun: The British School System Explained - Anglophenia

Friday Fun: The British School System Explained - Anglophenia

http://www.anglotopia.net/videos/friday-fun-british-school-system-explained-anglophenia/

Related:  Cultural Icons of English speaking countriesGreat BritainThemesGreat BritainEngelska

United Kingdom country profile - Overview 12 November 2014Last updated at 07:38 ET The United Kingdom is made up of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. It has a long history as a major player in international affairs and fulfils an important role in the EU, UN and Nato.

Britain is GREAT The GREAT Britain campaign showcases the very best of what Britain has to offer. We welcome the world to visit, study and do business with the UK. Business The UK’s dynamic economy and business-friendly environment make it a great place to locate and expand your business. Story of Stuff The Story of Stuff, originally released in December 2007, is a 20-minute, fast-paced, fact-filled look at the underside of our production and consumption patterns. The Story of Stuff exposes the connections between a huge number of environmental and social issues, and calls us together to create a more sustainable and just world. It’ll teach you something, it’ll make you laugh, and it just may change the way you look at all the Stuff in your life forever. Download the Fact Sheet Credits Geography of the UK The official title of the UK is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland . Great Britain (the formerly separate realms of England and Scotland, and the principality of Wales. ) Northern Ireland (also known as Ulster) Numerous smaller islands including the Isle of Wight, Anglesey, and the Scilly, Orkney, Shetland, and Hebridean archipelagos. The UK is an island nation in Western Europe just off the coast of France.

Wales profile - Overview 15 January 2013Last updated at 06:19 ET Wales, a part of the United Kingdom, has retained its distinctive culture and has enjoyed a degree of autonomy since 1999. It includes a heavily industrialised south, a largely-Anglicised and prosperous farming east, and a Welsh-speaking, hill-farming North and West. Wales' devolved government - home rule - is now acquiring more powers and its economy is refocusing on light industry, tourism and financial services, but a small population and poor transport infrastructure continue to make development uneven. Welsh identity and the Welsh language have received a boost from an enlivened popular culture scene in the 1990s, and from the devolution of power from the central government in London to the Welsh National Assembly in Cardiff. But Wales's rural hinterland is still experiencing an influx of mainly English professionals that some see as a threat to Welsh culture.

Teenagers and UK culture Why bring UK culture to the teen classroom? We can introduce UK culture into the English classroom to help our students improve their English and at the same time learn about values and ways of doing things which may be different to theirs. Learning about life and culture in the UK can be very motivating as it brings the language alive for learners and creates a link between language and real life. See if you agree with these comments from teachers on teaching UK culture to their teenage learners:

Let's talk about the UK (still with Scotland) At the beginning of the new school year teachers usually explain to their students what they are going to study. Sometimes efl teachers not only teach grammar but also British culture, so one of the first cultural topics they discuss with their students are the geography of the UK and its form of government. Here you can find an interactive mindmap, a digital poster and a collection of useful websites, just to simplify the work. Click on the Glogster digital poster below, you will find general information about the United Kingdom and some videos. Now take a look at my Cacoo mindmap below about the UK form of government. I have edited it with Thinglink to make it interactive.

"ESL English as a Second Language Listening and Reading Audiobooks" Arch of Triumph by Erich Maria Remarque It is 1939. Despite a law banning him from performing surgery, Ravic —a German doctor and refugee living in Paris— has been treating some of the city’s most elite citizens. Forbidden to return to his own country, and dodging the everyday dangers of jail and deportation, Ravic manages to hang on —all the while searching for the Nazi who tortured him back in Germany. Eating Food - Manners and Etiquette Learn about Christmas in England from the children who live in Britain Christmas traditions why do what we do at chrsitmas time The British generally pay a lot of attention to good table manners. Even young children are expected to eat properly with knife and fork.

Stonehenge - Tour around Britain Stonehenge is a mystical place. Its stone circles are probably more than 4,000 years old. The huge stones come from an area about 30 km north of Stonehenge. The smaller stones possibly are from the Preseli Mountains in Wales, almost 400 km away from Stonehenge. Nobody knows for sure what the function of Stonehenge was.

Show Us Your #SinglePointRubric The practice of using single point rubrics is slowly but surely catching on. The simplicity of these rubrics — with just a single column of criteria, rather than a full menu of performance levels — offers a whole host of benefits: Teachers find them easier and faster to create, because they no longer have to spend precious time thinking up all the different ways students could fail to meet expectations.Students find them easier to read when preparing an assignment. With only the target expectations to focus on, they are more likely to read those expectations.They allow for higher-quality feedback, because teachers must specify key problem areas and notable areas of excellence for that particular student, rather than choosing from a list of generic descriptions. I first talked about this type of rubric in an earlier post (Know Your Terms: Holistic, Analytic, and Single-Point Rubrics), and again in a post I wrote for Brilliant or Insane (Your Rubric is a Hot Mess; Here’s How to Fix It).

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