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The 8 Digital Literacy Practices Required for 21st Century Learners ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The 8 Digital Literacy Practices Required for 21st Century Learners ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning
January 4, 2015 Theoretically speaking, digital literacy is a concept that is in constant flux. It is perpetually shifting and expanding to include new practices and skills afforded by new emerging technologies. In their excellent book "Understanding Digital Literacies: A Practical Introduction", authors Jones and Hafner provide a detailed analysis of what it means to be a digitally literate in the light of the social media revolution and the widespread of web 2.0 technologies. Here is a quick overview of these practices: The ability to quickly search though and evaluate great masses of information.

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Related:  School Libraries make a differenceDigital LiteraciesDigitarinan lumoaDigital Literacy

Online referencing generator Access to information has never been easier for students as traditional print resources are supplemented with information from a plethora of World Wide Web sources. However, the ease of information access has developed a 'cut-and-paste' mentality to research, resulting in a rise in plagiarism among the student population. In order to minimise this problem, students need to be aware of the importance of acknowledging sources and, in particular, the conventions of referencing. This in itself can be problematic as teachers and teacher librarians often struggle to offer advice on referencing the ever-growing range of information sources.

What is digital literacy? CC licensed photo shared via Flickr by s@lly Digital literacy is the topic that made the ETMOOC learning space so irresistible to me… I think as educators we spout off about wanting our students to be digitally literate, but not many of us (myself included) have a firm grasp about what that actually means, and quite a number of us are still attempting to become digitally literate ourselves. Whatever that means. It turns out, defining digital literacy isn’t such an easy task.

Online Safety: A Teacher’s Guide to Dealing with Cyberbullying, Sexting, and Student Privacy Social media and text messages have blurred the lines between students’ school lives and private lives. While most schools take clear steps to protect students at school, more schools are beginning to consider the need to set policies that apply to students’ activities outside of school. When it comes to questionable online activities like cyberbullying and sexting, kids sometimes feel pressured to follow the crowd.

Awesome Visual Featuring 13 Important Google Search Tips for Students February 7, 2015 Here is a new interesting visual on Google search tips that I want to bring to your attention. The visual features 13 practical features that would allow students to conduct smart and time-saving searches on Google. We have already covered these and several other tips in previous posts here in this blog, but it would not hurt to remind our students of the rules of Google’s search game. Thing 31: Evidence Based Practice – Getting Started If school librarians can’t prove they make a difference, they may cease to exist.(Ross Todd – The Evidence-Based Manifesto for School Librarians SLJ, 2008) This first lesson in our latest Cool Tools track was inspired by conversations that started at a recent workshop by Jennifer LaGarde on annual reports and collecting data.

Digital Literacy Home Welcome to the Microsoft Digital Literacy curriculum. Whether you are new to computing or have some experience, Digital Literacy will help you develop a fundamental understanding of computers. The courses help you learn the essential skills to begin computing with confidence, be more productive at home and at work, stay safe online, use technology to complement your lifestyle, and consider careers where you can put your skills to work. Use the menu below to see the Digital Literacy curricula and courses available in your preferred language. After you select a language, click “go”, and the offers available will appear in a new dropdown box. The 8 Steps of A Great Digital Storytelling Process March , 2014 Integrating digital storytelling requires more than just knowledge of the web tools to use for creating and sharing digital stories, the process if much more important. Helping kids and students learn through the use of digital storytelling entails the implementation of a well-paced plan that clearly outlines both the objectives and expectations behind this integration. Samantha Morra (Google certified teacher) has this wonderful visual on the process of digital storytelling. This process comprises 8 steps : Come with an ideaResearch/explore and learnWrite/ScriptStoryboard/PlanGather/create images, gather/create audio, gather create video.Put it all togetherShareFeedback and reflect

Digital Kindergarten: Best Free Literacy Apps Why 'literacy' and not reading or writing? "The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) defines literacy as the ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, communicate, compute and use printed and written materials associated with varying contexts. Literacy involves a continuum of learning in enabling individuals to achieve their goals, to develop their knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in their community and wider society."

ACRL Report Shows Compelling Evidence of Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success A new report issued by ACRL, “Documented Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success: Building Evidence with Team-Based Assessment in Action Campus Projects,” shows compelling evidence for library contributions to student learning and success. The report focuses on dozens of projects conducted as part of the program Assessment in Action: Academic Libraries and Student Success (AiA) by teams that participated in the second year of the program, from April 2014 to June 2015. Synthesizing more than 60 individual project reports (fully searchable online) and using past findings from projects completed during the first year of the AiA program as context, the report identifies strong evidence of the positive contributions of academic libraries to student learning and success in four key areas: Students benefit from library instruction in their initial coursework. Join a free ACRL Presents live webcast to hear more from the report authors on Monday, May 9, from 1:00 — 2:00 p.m.

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