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Un moyen de protéger les côtes et les rives ?

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Living shorelines: How nature can help us beat back rising seas. Texte de la pétition: To stop UK floods: plant trees, and stop shooting beavers! De l’espace pour le fleuve. Conséquence des changements climatiques et de l’activité humaine, la fréquence des inondations ne cesse d’augmenter en Europe.

De l’espace pour le fleuve

En l’absence d’une stratégie commune, les États choisissent des solutions diverses face à cette menace. Les températures à New York pourraient grimper de sept degrés en un siècle. Le Monde.fr | • Mis à jour le | Par Stéphane Lauer (New York, correspondant) La période de froid intense que connaît actuellement New York coïncide avec la parution mardi 17 février du rapport annuel sur le changement climatique (Building the Knowledge Base for Climate Resiliency).

Les températures à New York pourraient grimper de sept degrés en un siècle

Cette publication, qui avait été lancée sous le mandat de Michael Bloomberg, a été poursuivie par son successeur, Bill de Blasio, maire de New York, depuis le 1er janvier 2014. Le but de ce rapport, réalisé par des scientifiques, des experts des infrastructures et du management des risques, consiste à établir chaque année des projections à propos des effets du réchauffement climatique sur la ville la plus peuplées des États-Unis (8,4 millions d’habitants) et à proposer toute une série de mesures pour s’en prémunir. 7 degrés en plus d’ici la fin du siècle ?

Ce rapport rappelle que les températures relevées à Central Park, en plein cœur de Manhattan, ont augmenté d’environ un degré depuis 1900. 150 hurricanes later, these island people can teach us a few things about surviving climate change. As coastal cities and states strategize ways to protect residents from climate change impacts, they would be well-served to talk with members of the Gullah/Geechee Nation.

150 hurricanes later, these island people can teach us a few things about surviving climate change

These are the people, descendants of enslaved Africans, who live among a string of islands stretching along the Atlantic seaboard from Jacksonville, N.C., to Jacksonville, Fla. As you might imagine, this means that their homes and businesses are on the front lines of any violent weather attack striking the U.S. from the southeast. Almost 150 hurricanes hit these states between 1851 and 2013. And yet the Gullahs and Geechees have found ways to preserve their culture and ways of living for generations. Thalassa en replay. Tropical forests mitigate extreme weather events. Tropical forests reduce peak runoff during storms and release stored water during droughts, according to researchers working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama.

Tropical forests mitigate extreme weather events

Their results lend credence to a controversial phenomenon known as the sponge effect, which is at the center of a debate about how to minimize flood damage and maximize water availability in the tropics. How offshore wind farms could protect us from hurricanes. It’s time to turn the tables on hurricanes.

How offshore wind farms could protect us from hurricanes

Instead of allowing their ferocious winds to tear apart our cities and infrastructure, why not use those winds to produce clean electricity? Stanford University researchers used computer simulations to calculate that a protective wall of 70,000 offshore wind turbines built 60 miles offshore from New Orleans would have reduced Hurricane Katrina’s wind speeds by 50 percent by the time it reached land. The storm surges that toppled levees would have been reduced by nearly three-quarters. Philippines Plans Mangrove Forest to Protect Coasts From Future Storms - Southeast Asia Real Time. MANILA—The Philippines has firmed up plans to develop a mangrove forest along the eastern seaboard of two islands hit hardest by Typhoon Haiyan to act as a first-line of defense again the impact of future storms.

Philippines Plans Mangrove Forest to Protect Coasts From Future Storms - Southeast Asia Real Time

European Pressphoto Agency Destroyed houses on the coast are seen from a Philippine Air force helicopter in typhoon-devastated Leyte Province, Philippines, on Nov. 15. Haiyan is one of the strongest storms ever to make landfall, and the deadliest to hit the Philippines in modern history. Nature vs. nature: Is “green infrastructure” the best defense against climate disasters? A year ago, Northeasterners were bracing for the worst.

Nature vs. nature: Is “green infrastructure” the best defense against climate disasters?

On Oct. 27, with Superstorm Sandy pinwheeling up the East Coast, Gov. Chris Christie declared a state of emergency in all of New Jersey. Here’s an easy way to protect coastal communities from rising seas and storms. Can bringing wetlands back to our coasts protect us from future megastorms? Kevin Shanley says too many cities have an outdated approach to storm protection that makes them vulnerable to the coming mega-storms.

Can bringing wetlands back to our coasts protect us from future megastorms?

The CEO of SWA Group, an international landscape architecture, planning, and urban design firm, Shanley is an advocate of using “green infrastructure” — human-made systems that mimic natural ones — as bulwarks. In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, people are taking note. Some experts believe New York City would not have sustained such severe damage had the original wetlands that lined the coasts not been uprooted by development. Want Protection from Superstorms? Bring Back Our Wetlands. Wetlands are disappearing faster, just when we need them the most. Dunes, reefs protect U.S. coasts from climate change. Rising sea levels and extreme weather put 16% of U.S. coastlines at "high-hazard" risk and the number of threatened residents could double if natural habitats -- sand dunes, coral reefs, sea grasses, mangroves -- aren't protected, Stanford University researchers say in a study today.

Dunes, reefs protect U.S. coasts from climate change

The study, noting that 23 of the 25 most densely populated U.S. counties are coastal, comes as U.S. and local officials are looking at "hardening" shorelines with billion-dollar sea walls and other projects in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, which devastated the mid-Atlantic coast last October.