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Online Privacy

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How to get a personal VPN and why you need one now — Quartz. “A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any other invention with the possible exceptions of handguns and Tequila.” — Mitch Ratcliffe Soon every mistake you’ve ever made online will not only be available to your internet service provider (ISP) — it will be available to any corporation or foreign government who wants to see those mistakes.

How to get a personal VPN and why you need one now — Quartz

Thanks to last week’s US Senate decision and yesterday’s House decision, ISPs can sell your entire web browsing history to literally anyone without your permission. The only rules that prevented this are all being repealed, and won’t be reinstated any time soon (it would take an act of Congress). You might be wondering: Who benefits from repealing these rules? Other than those four monopoly ISPs that control America’s “last mile” of internet cables and cell towers? No one. In other words, these politicians — who have received millions of dollars in campaign contributions from the ISPs for decades — have sold us out.

How did this happen? Privacy for anyone anywhere. Resist Surveillance. How to foil NSA sabotage: use a dead man's switch. The more we learn about the breadth and depth of the NSA and GCHQ's programmes of spying on the general public, the more alarming it all becomes.

How to foil NSA sabotage: use a dead man's switch

The most recent stories about the deliberate sabotage of security technology are the full stop at the end of a sentence that started on 8 August, when the founder of Lavabit (the privacy oriented email provider used by whistleblower Edward Snowden) abruptly shut down, with its founder, Ladar Levison, obliquely implying that he'd been ordered to secretly subvert his own system to compromise his users' privacy. It doesn't really matter if you trust the "good" spies of America and the UK not to abuse their powers (though even the NSA now admits to routine abuse), you should still be wary of deliberately weakened security. It is laughable to suppose that the back doors that the NSA has secretly inserted into common technologies will only be exploited by the NSA. One important check against the NSA's war on security is transparency. Facebook privacy and kids: Don’t post photos of your kids online.

Photo by Hemera/Thinkstock I vividly remember the Facebook post.

Facebook privacy and kids: Don’t post photos of your kids online

It was my friend’s 5-year-old daughter “Kate,” (a pseudonym) standing outside of her house in a bright yellow bikini, the street address clearly visible behind her on the front door. A caption read “Leaving for our annual Labor Day weekend at the beach,” and beneath it were more than 50 likes and comments from friends—including many “friends” that Kate’s mom barely knew. The picture had been uploaded to a Facebook album, and there were 114 shots just of Kate: freshly cleaned and swaddled on the day of her birth … giving her Labradoodle a kiss … playing on a swing set.

But there were also photos of her in a bathtub and an awkward moment posing in her mother’s lacy pink bra. I completely understood her parents’ desire to capture Kate’s everyday moments, because early childhood is so ephemeral. Last week, Facebook updated its privacy policy again. Six thousand respondents to Slate’s survey show a clear trend.

Surveilance State

Mailpile: Let’s take email back! Opt out of PRISM, the NSA’s global data surveillance program - PRISM Break. Heml.is - The Beautiful & Secure Messenger. Search DuckDuckGo. Hushmail – Free Email with Privacy. Collusion. 5 ways to easily increase your internet security - Seattle Political Buzz. In this age of technology nothing is private. In fact, NSA whistleblower William Binney recently stated that literally every email sent in the US is recorded by the FBI. For those living in reality, it has been know that since the 90's under President Clinton, programs such as Echelon monitored nearly every phone call, fax, and email in the United States.

Sites like Facebook have been known to record users web history even when they are logged out. Google has had to pay out millions for its privacy violations such as disabling privacy settings on Internet browsers to allow them to track you. Google Street View cars used to take pictures for Google Earth were caught stealing passwords and information from home computers it drove past. Good Internet security is not about "having something to hide. " Use Startpage! Most people are familiar with cookies, small pieces of data sent from a website and stored in a user's web browser while a user is browsing a website.

Cryptocat. Startpage Search Engine. Tor Project: Anonymity Online.