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Vtunnel.com is here to help you beat internet filtering!

Vtunnel.com is here to help you beat internet filtering!
Vtunnel is here to protect your anonymity online! Vtunnel is here to help you get to the websites you want to go to online. Many organizations these days block access to sites like myspace, gmail, even google search! I find that claiming that filters are there to keep schoolkids learning rather than goofing off, and then going ahead and blocking a primary means of research such as google search, is hypocritical and even dangerous. Thanks to sites like this one however, you can fight back and access the web the way it was meant to be accessed. By browsing the web through our service, the majority of the blocked websites you want to go to can be accessed again.

http://www.vtunnel.com/

Related:  Websurfing ProxySafe SurfingPrivacy

What is a Tor Relay? We use Tor to access our website and to publish to our blog, which is blocked inside of our country. -- Iranian human rights activist Tor is a service that helps you to protect your anonymity while using the Internet. Tor is comprised of two parts: software you can download that allows you to use the Internet anonymously, and the volunteer network of computers that makes it possible for that software to work. When you use the Tor software, your IP address remains hidden and it appears that your connection is coming from the IP address of a Tor exit relay, which can be anywhere in the world. There are many reasons you might use Tor, including keeping websites from tracking you and your family members, using websites or services which are blocked in your country (for example, getting around the Great Firewall of China), and maintaining anonymity when communicating about socially sensitive information, such as health issues or whistleblowing.

the radical transparency of DAVID BRIN The Transparent Society: Will Technology Force Us to Choose Between Privacy and Freedom? was published in May 1998 by Perseus Press (formerly Addison Wesley). This large nonfiction work concerns threats to privacy and openness in the information age. It won the Obeler Freedom of Speech Award from the American Library Association and was a finalist for the McGannon Public Policy Prize, and is still in print. Our society has one great knack above all others -- one that no other ever managed -- that of holding the mighty accountable. Android Instructions Tor on Android Tor is available for Android by installing our package named Orbot. Orbot is an application that allows mobile phone users to access the web, instant messaging and email without being monitored or blocked by their mobile internet service provider. Orbot brings the features and functionality of Tor to the Android mobile operating system.

DIVINA: Discovering Vulnerabilities of Internet Accounts#2 In 2012, Mat Honan found that his Twitter account had been hacked. When trying to figure out what happened, he found that not just his Twitter account was hacked, but also his Amazon account, his Gmail account, and his Apple account — meaning that all data in these accounts was lost. His iPhone was locked, and his Mac was wiped clean. All data was erased. As it turned out, Hackers were able to access his Amazon account. How to Become Anonymous on the Internet Using Tor The internet is a scary place, and if you're like me, you don't want anyone tracking you or learning your search habits. It's a blatant invasion of privacy for companies to do this, but at least we have methods of fighting back—one of which is Tor. Tor stands for The Onion Router. It operates by donated bandwidth from its users.

How to conduct a security audit of your Google account February 18, 2014, 10:04 AM — Image credit: flickr/s2art The privacy dangers of Google go beyond what Google knows about you -- you may have given dozens of sites access to your Google account information without realizing it. Here's how to conduct a security audit of your Google account, and how to take action to keep it safe. How to prevent Google from tracking you Much has been made of Google's new privacy policy, which takes effect March 1. If you're concerned about Google misusing your personal information or sharing too much of it with advertisers and others, there are plenty of ways to thwart Web trackers. But what exactly are you thwarting? You don't become anonymous when you block tracking cookies, Web beacons, and the other identifiers as you browse.

9 Tips to Stay Safe on Public Wi-Fi Your bank calls you to verify your recent $750 bill at an out-of-state Taco Bell, but you haven’t left town in weeks. You quickly contest the charge and request a new credit card, but when you check your wallet the compromised card is still there. You try to think of shady ATMs or recent cashiers, but nothing comes to mind. Nothing, except the online purchase you made while browsing the Internet at your local coffee shop.

ANONYMITY & PRIVACY [ English | German ] Protection of Privacy on the Internet JAP (called JonDo in the scope of the commercial JonDonym anonymous proxy servers - AN.ON remains free of charge) makes it possible to surf the internet anonymously and unobservably. Doxxing defense: Remove your personal info from data brokers Many women gamers and developers, as well as those who support them, have lately come under attack from online trolls. A common intimidation tactic that trolls use is "doxxing," or publicly exposing their targets' personal details, including home address, phone number and even financial records. Doxxing is often accompanied by threats of violence, sexual assault or murder. The message is clear: We're out to get you, and we know where you live. Some women in tech have left their chosen profession rather than deal with continued threats. But anyone is susceptible to doxxing, as game developer Phil Fish discovered this summer after speaking up in defense of a female developer.

Why and How iOS Apps Are Grabbing Your Data Early last week the personal diary app Path became the fulcrum of a massive discussion about how cavalier mobile apps are getting with harvesting your, presumably, personal information. Path was found by a developer to send the entire contents of its users Address Books, where, it was uncovered, it was being stored locally. Predictably, when privacy issues are concerned, there was an outcry about how Path handled the data, and many decried it for being underhanded or even flat out lying about its procedures. But, as with most things, there is a bigger story here and it turns out that what Path was doing was far from out of the ordinary. In fact, according to independent testing shared with The Next Web by developer Paul Haddad of Tapbots, many apps that are far more popular than Path are transmitting your data, and many of them have been doing it completely without your knowledge or consent until the Path story blew up, forcing them to immediately update their apps. No easy answer

What Is Deep Packet Inspection? It’s easy to turn a deaf ear to the controversy surrounding recent copyright protection bills like the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) or the PROTECT IP Act, which threatened to curtail free speech on the Internet by allowing the U.S. Department of Justice to blacklist and block access to websites suspected of copyright infringement. Most of us don’t visit websites suspected of illegally distributing copyrighted material, so blocking us from accessing them seems harmless. But should your ISP ever be legally obligated to prevent you from accessing restricted websites, it will have to find a way to monitor your online activity, and that could cause your privacy to be compromised if your ISP employs deep packet inspection tools to keep tabs on you. To understand how deep packet inspection works and the potential threat it poses to your privacy, you need to know that your PC packages all the information you send and receive online into packets of data.

Ghostery Ghosterians! We have a new release ready for the masses. We found a few issues and made some updates. You all have been awesome sending us some quirky behaviour as well. So to you.. we say "Thanks!"

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