Neurology and Psychiatry

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Neurology vs Psychiatry Neurology and psychiatry are related fields - if for no other reason, because neurological disorders can often manifest as, and get misdiagnosed as, psychiatric ones. But what's the borderline between neurology and psychiatry? What makes one disease "neurological" and another "mental"? Are some psychiatric disorders more "neurological" than others? It's a rather philosophical question and you could discuss it for as long as you wanted. Rather than doing that I thought I'd have a look to see which disorders are, at the moment, considered to fall into each category. Neurology vs Psychiatry
Guitarist refused to let the music die - SignOnSanDiego.com Billy McLaughlin concert When: Thursday, 7 p.m. Where: Neurosciences Institute, 10640 John Jay Hopkins Drive Cost: $25 general admission, $45 VIP More information: tickets4billy.com Guitarist refused to let the music die - SignOnSanDiego.com
Most ALS May Stem from Protein Misfolding - in Neurology, General Neurology from MedPage Today Most ALS May Stem from Protein Misfolding - in Neurology, General Neurology from MedPage Today Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be a disease of protein misfolding, according to a study that affirms that abnormal protein structure found in inherited cases plays a role in sporadic cases as well. Shape change in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) protein may be the common source of motor neuron death behind most ALS, Robert H. Brown, Jr., MD, DPhil, of the University of Massachusetts Medical Center in Worcester, Mass., and colleagues reported online in Nature Neuroscience. Their protein analysis of SOD1 from ALS patients showed the same specific conformational change in mutated SOD1 and wild-type protein that had been damaged by oxidation in roughly half of the sporadic cases.
McLeod syndrome McLeod syndrome (or McLeod phenomenon) is a genetic disorder that may affect the blood, brain, peripheral nerves, muscle and heart. It is caused by a variety of recessively-inherited mutations in the XK gene on the X chromosome. The gene is responsible for producing the Kx protein, a secondary supportive protein for the Kell antigen on the red blood cell surface. McLeod syndrome
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Activities - Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery
It is easy to be convinced that deep brain stimulation (DBS) works to improve Tourette syndrome. Just watch Jamie Furlonger before and after his DBS operation. His vocal and motor tics seem to disappear as the stimulation is turned on. Is this a "miracle," as it was described by reporters? “The trap that the medical community and the press can fall into is conveying a false message that DBS is a cure for Tourette syndrome, or that we really understand it well at this point,” says Paul Larson, a neurosurgeon at the University of California Medical Center who specializes in the surgical treatment of movement disorders. It is still not known how DBS works. Treating Tourette Syndrome with Deep Brain Surgery Treating Tourette Syndrome with Deep Brain Surgery
nervous system diagnostic terms flashcards
A 45 year old female teacher had a history of severe obsessive-compulsive disorder, along with other problems including ADHD. Her daughter, and many other people in her family, had suffered the same problems and in a few cases had Tourette's Syndrome. But all that changed - when she suffered a stroke. This is according to a brief case report from Drs. Diamond and Ondo of Texas: [she] had a long history of constant intrusive and obsessive thoughts that interrupted her daily activities and sleep. A Stroke Of Good Fortune Cures OCD? A Stroke Of Good Fortune Cures OCD?
The Neuro Times: Featured Neurologist: Charles Putnam Symonds The Neuro Times: Featured Neurologist: Charles Putnam Symonds Charles Putnam Symonds was born in London, England to Charter Symonds, a surgeon at Guy’s Hospital and the Association of British Neurologists’ tenth President. Symonds was educated at Oxford University's New College and Guy’s Hospital, where he trained under Arthur Hurst and Adolph Meyer. Symonds received his medical qualification in 1915.
The relevance of Nash equilibrium to psychiatric d... [Theor Med Bioeth. 2011] - PubMed result The relevance of Nash equilibrium to psychiatric d... [Theor Med Bioeth. 2011] - PubMed result <p class="nojs"><strong>Warning:</strong> The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/corehtml/query/static/unsupported-browser.html#enablejs" title="Learn how to enable JavaScript" target="_blank">more...</a></p> Sign in to NCBI
The Brain Observatory In the summer of 1953, Henry Gustav Molaison (1926-2008) underwent brain surgery to contain epileptic seizures that had become critically debilitating. The intervention brought some relief from convulsions, but these positive results were overshadowed by an astonishing and indelible side effect. Soon after the operation, it became apparent that he could no longer recognize hospital staff, he did not remember the way home, he did not remember newspaper articles he had just read, nor the crossword puzzles he had solved; otherwise, he was completely normal. Since the time of the surgery, more than five decades of scrupulous neuropsychological research examined the nature of patient H.M.'s amnesia which proved to be both persistent and remarkably selective. The goal of our project is to provide a window into the brain of the man who helped establish the scientific study of memory and unfailingly forgot the enormously generous contribution he made to medical research. The Brain Observatory
The serotonin transporter (SERT) ensures the recapture of serotonin and is the pharmacological target of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants. We show that SERT is a target of microRNA-16 (miR-16). miR-16 is expressed at higher levels in noradrenergic than in serotonergic cells; its reduction in noradrenergic neurons causes de novo SERT expression. In mice, chronic treatment with the SSRI fluoxetine (Prozac) increases miR-16 levels in serotonergic raphe nuclei, which reduces SERT expression. Further, raphe exposed to fluoxetine release the neurotrophic factor S100β, which acts on noradrenergic cells of the locus coeruleus. MiR-16 Targets the Serotonin Transporter: A New Facet for Adaptive Responses to Antidepressants -- Baudry et al. 329 (5998): 1537 -- Science MiR-16 Targets the Serotonin Transporter: A New Facet for Adaptive Responses to Antidepressants -- Baudry et al. 329 (5998): 1537 -- Science
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Some people are night owls, and others are morning larks. What makes the difference may be their levels of general intelligence . Virtually all species in nature , from single-cell organisms to mammals, including humans, exhibit a daily cycle of activity called circadian rhythm . The circadian rhythm in mammals is regulated by two clusters of nerve cells called the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the anterior hypothalamus. Why Night Owls Are More Intelligent than Morning Larks