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Repressed Emotions

Repressed Emotions
Ryan Brown, ContributorWaking Times A common way in which we deal with unpleasant emotions is to suppress or ignore them. These are normal coping mechanisms our minds uses to handle situations we don’t particularly want to deal with in the present moment. When strong emotions come into our consciousness, there is often something inside of us which says, “This is going to ruin my happiness right now and I don’t like that, so I’ll just deal with it later.” The problem with this approach is that ‘later’ never comes and these emotions get pushed further down, out of our conscious awareness. It is a basic law of the universe that energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can only change form. This ‘dust’ is actually emotional energy that resonates with the repressed emotion. This internal pressure of repressed emotions is what many of us are afraid to look at. When an emotional trauma occurs, there is the choice to either deal with it effectively or to turn away from it. The Good News

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2014/06/10/decompressing-emotions-radical-acceptance-freeing-repressed-emotions-emotional-energy-decompressing-repressed-emotions/

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Releasing Unexpressed Emotion Randi G. Fine, ContributorWaking Times “Unexpressed emotion will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways.” ~Sigmund Freud Flame Retardants and Fluoride—Two Neurotoxic Chemicals Again Linked to Reduced IQ Dr. MercolaWaking Times Did you know that items you come into contact with every day, such as your couch cushions, your carpeting, and your mattress, might be exposing you to highly toxic compounds? Recognize these emotions The Passion and Reason 15 The book Passion and Reason provides clear definitions and descriptions of 15 separate emotions. These are: Trigger Positive Emotions People who see the glass half-full are certainly happier than the pessimists of the world, and learning to think positively is worthwhile. However, changing the way you think can be surprisingly tricky, especially when the going gets tough. What if there were a way—a shortcut or hack—that positively affected how you feel when you just can’t seem to shake the blues? A few years ago, I came across a simple idea that has been validated in hundreds of experiments and has given rise to quick and effective exercises that can help you feel happier, avoid anxiety, increase your willpower, deepen relationships and boost confidence. Perhaps most surprising of all, it does not involve trying to change how you think.

11 Ways Our Society Treats Us Like Caged Rats: Do Our Addictions Stem from that Trapped Feeling? Charles Eisenstein, The FixWaking Times Instead of a moral failing or physiological malfunction, is addiction an adaptive response to circumstances? You’ve probably heard about those addiction studies with caged lab rats, in which the rats compulsively press the heroin dispensing lever again and again, even to the point of choosing it over food and starving themselves to death. Emotional Intelligence theories This webpage is a new format for mobile/small screens. Please send your feedback if it fails to operate well. Thanks. emotional intelligence theory (EQ - Emotional Quotient) Emotional Intensity Do you consider yourself an emotional person? If a potential friend candidly described you that way to your face, would you be flattered or disturbed? Compared to most people you know, are you stronger in the intensity and range of your feelings, milder, or somewhere in between? Whereas for centuries astute observers of the human condition have noted that people vary remarkably in this dimension — it's been the theme of many great novels — only recently have psychologists come to understand that this difference is already apparent on our first day of postnatal existence — and continues strikingly unchanged ever after. Emotional Intensity clearly plays a major role in love relationships, yet has oddly been all but ignored professionally. The vast realm of our feelings is clearly experienced differently by people across cultures.

Does Mental Illness Truly Exist As Western Medicine Has Us Believing? Andrew Barker, Collective-EvolutionWaking Times Is mental illness real as we now define it today? Identification as the mind certainly is and this is the actual problem that we are faced with that is only just being acknowledged in the western world. Mental illness is at epidemic proportions in “developed” countries; with 1 in 4 people in the US having some sort of mental illness (this rate is always rising), and there are kids as young as 5 on antidepressants and other behavioral drugs, even pets are on these drugs too!

CALLIHOO Writing Helps Character Feelings You can describe your character's feelings in more exact terms than just "happy" or "sad." Check these lists for the exact nuance to describe your character's intensity of feelings.

15 Things That Emotionally Strong People Don't Do There is a particular aspect of mental strength that is the deciding factor of whether or not you will have a good life. There are many levels to mental strength and all are needed to be successful and happy. The one particular area of mental strength that has the greatest impact is that of emotional strength. Emotions are, of course, a part of our psyche, yet nevertheless, can be distinguished from the remainder of mental qualities because they most directly influence our physical body. They affect the way our body functions and they drive every single one of our actions. Ivy SeaZine - Why 'Normal' is NOT a Virtue Inspiration for Now - Vol. 10, No. 21 Why is 'Normal' NOT a Virtue? Greetings! One of my favorite movie lines is about'being normal'. As it turns out, 'Aunt Frances' isn't a fan of 'normal'. Take a look below to read Aunt Frances's quote, and some musings on why you might not want to be 'normal' after all.

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