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What a Shaman Sees in A Mental Hospital

What a Shaman Sees in A Mental Hospital
Stephanie Marohn with Malidoma Patrice SoméWaking Times The Shamanic View of Mental Illness In the shamanic view, mental illness signals “the birth of a healer,” explains Malidoma Patrice Somé. Thus, mental disorders are spiritual emergencies, spiritual crises, and need to be regarded as such to aid the healer in being born. What those in the West view as mental illness, the Dagara people regard as “good news from the other world.” The person going through the crisis has been chosen as a medium for a message to the community that needs to be communicated from the spirit realm. One of the things Dr. “I was so shocked. Another way to say this, which may make more sense to the Western mind, is that we in the West are not trained in how to deal or even taught to acknowledge the existence of psychic phenomena, the spiritual world. “The Western culture has consistently ignored the birth of the healer,” states Dr. Schizophrenia and Foreign Energy Alex: Crazy in the USA, Healer in Africa Dr. Dr.

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2014/08/22/shaman-sees-mental-hospital/

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Earthing Sheets Connect Us to the Schumann Resonance In 2007, a team of researchers from the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health ran a study and concluded the following, “The nature of the electromagnetic environments that most humans are now regularly exposed to has changed dramatically over the past century and often bears little resemblance to those created in Nature”. “In particular, the increased masking/shielding/insulation of individuals from beneficial types of natural electromagnetic phenomena, the presence of synthetic materials that can gain strong charge and increase exposures to inappropriate electric field levels and polarities have greatly altered the electromagnetic nature of the microenvironments many individuals usually occupy.” Here’s the problem. Living indoors disconnects us from our natural electric state & hinders our bodies ability to tell time.

4 Ways To Honor Native Americans Without Appropriating Our Culture I recently had a friend – a nice white lady I’ve known for years – ask me whether buying moccasins for her infant son would be considered cultural appropriation, and therefore offensive. She has read my many rants on things like hipster headdresses and Native American mascots, and she wanted to make sure that she wasn’t doing anything to warrant my Lakota wrath or a hashtag like #NotYourBabyFootware or whatever. I’ll tell you what I told her: There is a fine line between appropriation and appreciation. When Natives decry the wearing of faux headdresses at music festivals and in fashion spreads, or when we protest the use of our imagery on underwear and football helmets, we’re asking people like Ted Nugent and Pharrell Williams and institutions like the Washington Redskins to stop profiting from stereotypes proven to harm and dehumanize Native people. With that, I give you four ways to honor Native Americans without dehumanizing them. 1.

Mother Mary and Mary Magdalene via Natalie Glasson: Discussions on Supportive Steps to Dissolve Fear and Illness Mother Mary and Mary Magdalene: Discussions on Supportive Steps to Dissolve Fear and Illness, channeled by Natalie Glasson, October 17, 2014, Mother Mary : It is with the vibration of the 9th Ray of Light that I greet you today, bringing forth the brilliant colors and vibrations of a blue and green light, focused upon soul integration and exploration, as well as the merging of the heavens with the Earth – light with matter. Please allow me to dowse you in the blue and green light, permitting it to seep into your entire being.

The Woman Who Chose to Plant Corn Not long ago, a Diné (Navajo) friend of mine, Lyla June Johnston, sent me a one-line email: “I am not going to Harvard… I am going to plant corn.” Her statement signals a profound divergence from the path she’d set out on when she was an undergraduate at Stanford University. She is choosing instead to learn the lifeways of her culture, to become fluent in her language, to relearn traditional skills, to be intimate with the land. The dominant American culture does not encourage such a path. We’d talked about it before, her decision to take a prestigious graduate course at Harvard. The usual themes came up: the doors that might be opened, the credibility that might be turned towards a good cause.

Ivy SeaZine - Why 'Normal' is NOT a Virtue Inspiration for Now - Vol. 10, No. 21 Why is 'Normal' NOT a Virtue? Greetings! One of my favorite movie lines is about'being normal'. Horse Medicine : What Horses Teach Us Speed, strength, and grace are the finer qualities of this noble animal. The horse lived on the North American continent for thousands of years, but mysteriously disappeared and was later reintroduced by Spanish Conquistadors in the 1500's. American Indians quickly mastered equestrian skills and found the spirit of the horse to be a valuable asset in learning ways of leadership, safety in movement and freedom. Even though the horse can be domesticated, it's spirit forever roams into the far reaches of freedom. The horse meant ease of movement for indigenous people who quickly learned they could hunt and move into new territories as never before.

Does Mental Illness Truly Exist As Western Medicine Has Us Believing? Andrew Barker, Collective-EvolutionWaking Times Is mental illness real as we now define it today? Identification as the mind certainly is and this is the actual problem that we are faced with that is only just being acknowledged in the western world. Mental illness is at epidemic proportions in “developed” countries; with 1 in 4 people in the US having some sort of mental illness (this rate is always rising), and there are kids as young as 5 on antidepressants and other behavioral drugs, even pets are on these drugs too! In the mean time, there are countries and cultures where mental illness is virtually unheard of. The western world writes 170 million prescriptions for antidepressants per year and has a HUGE range of illnesses, whereas certain societies in Tibet and India don’t even have words that can translate as anxiety, depression, bi-polar, etc.

Reporter's Notebook: 'What Part Of Sacred Don't You Understand?' : Code Switch hide captionNavajo activist Klee Benally chains himself to an excavator on the San Francisco Peaks, which he and 13 tribes consider sacred. Ethan Sing Navajo activist Klee Benally chains himself to an excavator on the San Francisco Peaks, which he and 13 tribes consider sacred. Laurel Morales covers Indian Country as a reporter for NPR member station KJZZ from a base in Flagstaff, which is on the edge of the country's largest reservation. The Paris auction of 27 sacred American-Indian items earlier this month marks just the latest in a series of conflicts between what tribes consider sacred and what western cultures think is fair game in the marketplace.

11 Ways Our Society Treats Us Like Caged Rats: Do Our Addictions Stem from that Trapped Feeling? Charles Eisenstein, The FixWaking Times Instead of a moral failing or physiological malfunction, is addiction an adaptive response to circumstances? You’ve probably heard about those addiction studies with caged lab rats, in which the rats compulsively press the heroin dispensing lever again and again, even to the point of choosing it over food and starving themselves to death. These studies seemed to imply some pretty disheartening things about human nature. Our basic biology is not to be trusted; the seeking of pleasure leads to disaster; one must therefore overcome biological desires through reason, education, and the inculcation of morals; those whose willpower or morals are weak must be controlled and corrected.

Why So Many Icelanders Still Believe in Invisible Elves - Ryan Jacobs If a road is completely necessary, the elves will generally move out of the way, but if it is deemed superfluous, a possibility at Gálgahraun, “very bad things” might happen. “This elf church is connected by light energy to other churches, other places,” Jónsdóttir said. “So, if one of them is destroyed, it’s, uh, well, it’s not a good thing.”

Flame Retardants and Fluoride—Two Neurotoxic Chemicals Again Linked to Reduced IQ Dr. MercolaWaking Times Did you know that items you come into contact with every day, such as your couch cushions, your carpeting, and your mattress, might be exposing you to highly toxic compounds? In most cases, they will contain flame-retardant chemicals that have been linked to serious health risks like infertility, birth defects, neurodevelopmental delays, reduced IQ scores and behavioral problems in children, hormone disruptions, and various forms of cancer. In fact, flame retardant chemicals were recently identified as one of 17 “high priority” chemical groups that should be avoided to1, 2

How to Free Yourself From Repressed Emotions Ryan Brown, ContributorWaking Times A common way in which we deal with unpleasant emotions is to suppress or ignore them. These are normal coping mechanisms our minds uses to handle situations we don’t particularly want to deal with in the present moment. When strong emotions come into our consciousness, there is often something inside of us which says, “This is going to ruin my happiness right now and I don’t like that, so I’ll just deal with it later.” The problem with this approach is that ‘later’ never comes and these emotions get pushed further down, out of our conscious awareness. It is a basic law of the universe that energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can only change form.

El Mundo Bueno In Starhawk’s novel, The Fifth Sacred Thing, two vastly different worlds vie for control. In mundane terms: a utopian, earth-loving, community-oriented, individual honoring society that values freedom and the sacred fights for survival against corporate fascism, religious, financial, and soul oppression, hypocrisy, and the Police State — a culture’s unprocessed Shadow Side made manifest. In magical realist terms: “Doña Elena used to say that there was the Good Reality, El Mundo Bueno, literally the Good World, and the Bad Reality, El Mundo Malo, and they were always vying with each other. In the Good Reality you have a mild headache; in the Bad Reality you have a fatal brain disease. In the Good Reality, you catch hold of the rail as your foot slips; in the Bad Reality, you miss, slide down the stairs, and break your neck.

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