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Spoon River Anthology - Wikipedia.

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Wiki: People. Sympathetic ophthalmia. Phobos monolith. The location of the monolith (HiRISE image PIA10368) The general vicinity of the monolith is a proposed landing site for a Canadian Space Agency vehicle, funded by Optech and the Mars Institute, for an unmanned mission to Phobos known as PRIME (Phobos Reconnaissance and International Mars Exploration).[3] The PRIME mission would be composed of an orbiter and lander, and each would carry four instruments designed to study various aspects of Phobos' geology.[5] At present, PRIME has not been funded and does not have a projected launch date.

Phobos monolith

The object appears in Mars Global Surveyor images SPS252603 and SPS255103, dated 1998. The object is unrelated to another monolith located on the surface of Mars, which NASA noted as an example of a common surface feature in that region.[6] See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Conium maculatum. Conium maculatum (hemlock or poison hemlock) is a highly poisonous perennial herbaceous flowering plant in the carrot family Apiaceae, native to Europe and North Africa.[2] Description[edit] It is a herbaceous biennial plant that grows to 1.5–2.5 m (5–8 ft) tall, with a smooth, green, hollow stem, usually spotted or streaked with red or purple on the lower half of the stem.

Conium maculatum

All parts of the plant are hairless (glabrous). The leaves are two- to four-pinnate, finely divided and lacy, overall triangular in shape, up to 50 cm (20 in) long and 40 cm (16 in) broad. The flowers are small, white, clustered in umbels up to 10–15 cm (4–6 in) across. Delusional parasitosis. Delusional parasitosis, also known as delusional infestation[1] or Ekbom's syndrome,[2][3] is a delusional disorder in which individuals incorrectly believe they are infested with parasites, insects, or bugs, whereas in reality no such infestation is present.[4] Individuals with delusional parasitosis usually report tactile hallucinations known as formication, a sensation resembling insects crawling on or under the skin.

Delusional parasitosis

Delusional parasitosis is a mental disorder characterized by a fixed, false belief that a skin infestation exists, which is in contrast to cases of actual parasitosis, such as scabies and infestation with Demodex, in which a skin infestation is present and identifiable by a physician through physical examination or laboratory tests.[5][6] Morgellons is poorly understood but appears to be a form of this condition. The alternative name, Ekbom's syndrome, was named after Swedish neurologist Karl-Axel Ekbom,[7] who published seminal accounts of the disease in 1937 and 1938.

Dokkōdō. The "Dokkōdō" [ (Japanese: 独行道?)

Dokkōdō

; "The Path of Aloneness", "The Way to Go Forth Alone", or "The Way of Walking Alone"] is a short work written by Miyamoto Musashi (宮本 武蔵) a week before he died in 1645. It consists of either nineteen or twenty-one precepts; precepts 4 and 20 are omitted from the former version. "Dokkodo" was largely composed on the occasion of Musashi giving away his possessions in preparation for death, and was dedicated to his favorite disciple, Terao Magonojō (to whom the earlier Go rin no sho [The Book of Five Rings] had also been dedicated), who took them to heart.

"Dokkōdō" expresses a stringent, honest, and ascetic view of life. Wall Drug. Coordinates: Wall Drug Store, often called simply "Wall Drug," is a tourist attraction located in the city of Wall, South Dakota.

Wall Drug

It is a shopping mall consisting of a drug store, gift shop, restaurants and various other stores. Unlike a traditional shopping mall, all the stores at Wall Drug operate under a single entity instead of being individually run stores. Moving sofa problem. Hope Diamond. The Hope Diamond is one of the most legendary jewels of history, with ownership records dating back almost four centuries.

Hope Diamond

Its much-admired rare blue colour is due to trace amounts of boron atoms. Weighing 45.52 carats, its exceptional size has revealed new findings about the formation of gemstones. The Hope Diamond has long been rumored to carry a curse, possibly due to agents trying to arouse interest in the stone. It was last reported to be insured for $250 million. Dunning–Kruger effect. The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which low-ability individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability as much higher than it really is.

Dunning–Kruger effect

Psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger attributed this bias to a metacognitive incapacity, on the part of those with low ability, to recognize their ineptitude and evaluate their competence accurately. Their research also suggests corollaries: high-ability individuals may underestimate their relative competence and may erroneously assume that tasks which are easy for them are also easy for others.[1] Dunning and Kruger have postulated that the effect is the result of internal illusion in those of low ability and external misperception in those of high ability: "The miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others. Fasciation. Wyethia helianthoides or Mule's Ear Wildflower (on right) showing fasciation A "crested" Saguaro cactus (Carnegiea), resulting from fasciation, located at Saguaro National Park (West), Arizona, U.S.

Fasciation

Fasciation (pronounced /ˌfæʃiˈeɪʃən/, from the Latin root meaning "band" or "stripe"), also known as cresting, is a relatively rare condition of abnormal growth in vascular plants in which the apical meristem (growing tip), which normally is concentrated around a single point and produces approximately cylindrical tissue, instead becomes elongated perpendicularly to the direction of growth, thus, producing flattened, ribbon-like, crested, or elaborately contorted tissue.[1] Fasciation may also cause plant parts to increase in weight and volume in some instances.[2] The phenomenon may occur in the stem, root, fruit, or flower head.

Causation[edit] Danger triangle of the face. The danger triangle of the face consists of the area from the corners of the mouth to the bridge of the nose, including the nose and maxilla.[1][2] (pp345–346)Due to the special nature of the blood supply to the human nose and surrounding area, it is possible for retrograde infections from the nasal area to spread to the brain causing cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis or brain abscess.

Danger triangle of the face

This is possible because of venous communication (via the ophthalmic veins) between the facial vein and the cavernous sinus. The cavernous sinus lies within the cranial cavity, between layers of the meninges and is a major conduit of venous drainage from the brain.[3] It is a common misconception that the veins of the head do not contain one-way valves like other veins of the circulatory system. Infection of cavernous sinus[edit] Great Molasses Flood. The Great Molasses Flood, also known as the Boston Molasses Disaster or the Great Boston Molassacre, occurred on January 15, 1919, in the North End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, in the United States.

Great Molasses Flood

A large molasses storage tank burst, and a wave of molasses rushed through the streets at an estimated 35 mph (56 km/h), killing 21 and injuring 150. The event has entered local folklore, and for decades afterward residents claimed that on hot summer days the area still smelled of molasses.[1] Flood[edit] The disaster occurred at the Purity Distilling Company facility on January 15, 1919. The temperature had risen above 40 °F (4.4 °C), climbing rapidly from the frigid temperatures of the preceding days.[2]:91, 95 Modern downtown Boston with molasses flood area circled At about 12:30 in the afternoon near Keany Square,[3] at 529 Commercial Street, a molasses tank 50 ft (15 m) tall, 90 ft (27 m) in diameter, and containing as much as 2,300,000 US gal (8,700 m3), collapsed. ...

Microsoft vs. MikeRoweSoft. Microsoft argued that their trademark had been infringed because of the phonetic resemblance between "Microsoft" and "MikeRoweSoft".[1] Microsoft vs. MikeRoweSoft was a legal dispute between Microsoft and a Canadian Belmont High School student named Mike Rowe over the domain name "MikeRoweSoft.com".[2] The case received international press attention following Microsoft's perceived heavy-handed approach to a 12th grade student's part-time web design business and the subsequent support that Rowe received from the online community.[3] A settlement was eventually reached, with Rowe granting ownership of the domain to Microsoft in exchange for Microsoft products.[4]

Great Fire of London. Detail of the Great Fire of London by an unknown painter, depicting the fire as it would have appeared on the evening of Tuesday, 4 September 1666 from a boat in the vicinity of Tower Wharf. The Tower of London is on the right and London Bridge on the left, with St. List of unusual deaths. This is a list of unusual deaths. This list includes unique or extremely rare circumstances of death recorded throughout history, noted as being unusual by multiple sources. Some of the deaths are mythological or are considered to be unsubstantiated by contemporary researchers. Oxford Dictionaries defines the word "unusual" as "not habitually or commonly occurring or done" and "remarkable or interesting because different from or better than others.

"[1] Some other articles also cover deaths that might be considered unusual or ironic, including List of entertainers who died during a performance, List of inventors killed by their own inventions, List of association footballers who died while playing, List of professional cyclists who died during a race and the List of political self-immolations. Breast-shaped hill. Overview[edit] Falling cat problem. A falling cat modeled as two independently rotating parts turns around while maintaining zero net angular momentum.

St. Elmo's fire. St. Elmo's fire on a ship at sea. The Void (philosophy) Closed-eye hallucination. Closed-eye hallucinations and closed-eye visualizations (CEV) are a distinct class of hallucination. List of Nestlé brands. Pascal's Wager. Blaise Pascal Pascal's Wager is an argument in apologetic philosophy which was devised by the seventeenth-century French philosopher, mathematician, and physicist Blaise Pascal (1623–1662). It posits that humans all bet with their lives either that God exists or does not exist. Given the possibility that God actually does exist and assuming the infinite gain or loss associated with belief in God or with unbelief, a rational person should live as though God exists and seek to believe in God.

Wahhabism. List of largest empires. As Slow as Possible. Pseudanthium. Year Without a Summer. Geology of Mars. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva. Final girl. Autonomous sensory meridian response. Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko. Dominican Republic–Haiti relations. Capgras delusion. Semantic satiation. Macdonald triad. Mydriasis. USS Scorpion (SSN-589)

Voynich manuscript. Milgram experiment. Taman Shud Case. The Missing Shade of Blue. Sleep paralysis. Solipsism. Desiderata. Pareidolia. Moon rabbit. Sense of agency. The Juniper Tree (fairy tale) Stanford prison experiment. Proprioception. Foo fighter. Santuario de Las Lajas. Baltic Sea anomaly. Kuru (disease) Fabergé egg. Language of Flowers. List of unsolved problems in philosophy. Facilitated communication. Operant conditioning. Agraphesthesia.

EURion constellation.