background preloader

Art Deco

Art Deco
Historian Bevis Hillier defined Art Deco as "an assertively modern style [that] ran to symmetry rather than asymmetry, and to the rectilinear rather than the curvilinear; it responded to the demands of the machine and of new material [and] the requirements of mass production".[2] During its heyday, Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance and faith in social and technological progress. §Etymology[edit] The first use of the term Art Deco has been attributed to architect Le Corbusier, who penned a series of articles in his journal L'Esprit nouveau under the headline "1925 Expo: Arts Déco". He was referring to the 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exposition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts).[3] §Origins[edit] Joseph Csaky, Deux figures, 1920, relief, limestone, polychrome, 80 cm. Paul Iribe created for the couturier Paul Poiret esthetic designs that shocked the Parisian milieu with its novelty. §Attributes[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Deco

Related:  more about artWikipedia A

Victor Horta Victor, Baron Horta (6 January 1861 - 8 September 1947) was a Belgian architect and designer. John Julius Norwich described him as "undoubtedly the key European Art Nouveau architect." Indeed, Horta is one of the most important names in Art Nouveau architecture; the construction of his Hôtel Tassel in Brussels in 1892-3 means that he is sometimes credited as the first to introduce the style to architecture from the decorative arts. The French architect Hector Guimard was deeply influenced by Horta and further spread the "whiplash" style in France and abroad. Life and career[edit] Born in Ghent, Horta was first attracted to the architectural profession when he helped his uncle on a building site at the age of twelve.

Flapper A flapper onboard ship (1929) Flappers were a "new breed" of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.[1] Flappers had their origins in the liberal period of the Roaring Twenties, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe.

At home with eco-housing The time has come for low-energy housing in Belgium, as regional governments invest in lower energy consumption Anyone feeling particularly glum about life here as the mercury sinks has a point: houses in Belgium are, typically, poorly insulated and better equipped for Mediterranean climes. As we turn up the heat to stave off the winter chill, much of it goes straight out the window; not so good for our pockets, especially as oil prices trend upwards. Also out the window are Belgium’s climate change pledges, if the regional governments, responsible for environmental policy, don’t do something to cut households’ energy consumption. This is a large contributor (in Brussels, the largest) to national greenhouse gas emissions. While the federal government dragged its heels on implementing a European Union law on energy performance of buildings (setting standards on energy efficiency), households are now, by necessity, firmly in the regions’ sights.

How to Use Almost Any 35mm Film Camera (with pictures) Once your camera is set up, you can go out into the big blue room and take some great photographs. Older cameras, however, will require that you set many (sometimes all) of the things that a modern film or digital camera would handle for you automatically. 1Focus your shot. We'll detail this first because some old SLR cameras need their apertures stopped down in order to meter; this makes the viewfinder much darker, and makes it harder to see when you're in focus or not. <img alt="" src=" width="500" height="333" class="whcdn">The Canon EOS 650, an early auto-focus camera.Auto-focus cameras, common since the mid-1980s onwards, are the easiest.

Jazz Age The Jazz Age was a feature of the 1920s (ending with The Great Depression) when jazz music and dance became popular. This occurred particularly in the United States, but also in Britain, France and elsewhere. Jazz played a significant part in wider cultural changes during the period, and its influence on pop culture continued long afterwards. Jazz music originated mainly in New Orleans, and is/was a fusion of African and European music. The Jazz Age is often referred to in conjunction with the phenomenon referred to as the Roaring Twenties.

Belgium - Wikipedia Coordinates: Belgium ( i/ˈbɛldʒəm/; Dutch: België [ˈbɛlɣijə]; French: Belgique [bɛlʒik]; German: Belgien [ˈbɛlɡiən̩]), officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a sovereign state in Western Europe bordered by France, the Netherlands, Germany, Luxembourg, and the North Sea. It is a small, densely populated country which covers an area of 30,528 square kilometres (11,787 sq mi) and has a population of about 11 million people. Tate Britain: British Art from 1500 Pimlico: Victoria Line, 600 metres approx Vauxhall: Victoria Line, 850 metres approx Westminster: Jubilee, District and Circle Lines, 1,200 metres approx Route 87 stops on Millbank Routes 88 and C10 stop on John Islip Street Routes 2, 36, 185, 436 stop on Vauxhall Bridge Road.) Vauxhall 850 metres approx. Victoria 1,600 metres approx.

Mental breakdown Definition[edit] The terms "nervous breakdown" and "mental breakdown" have not been formally defined through a medical diagnostic system such as the DSM-IV or ICD-10, and are nearly absent from current scientific literature regarding mental illness.[1][2] Although "nervous breakdown" does not necessarily have a rigorous or static definition, surveys of laypersons suggest that the term refers to a specific acute time-limited reactive disorder, involving symptoms such as anxiety or depression, usually precipitated by external stressors.[1] Specific cases are sometimes described as a "breakdown" only after a person becomes unable to function in day-to-day life.[3]

Related: