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Orgone energy accumulator (with door closed) (with door open) Alternating layers of organic and non-organic materials inside the walls supposedly increase the orgone concentration inside the enclosure relative to the surrounding environment. Reich's theories held that deficits or constrictions in bodily orgone were at the root of many diseases—including cancer—much as deficits or constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses in Freudian theory. Reich founded the Orgone Institute ca. 1942[10] to pursue research into orgone energy after he immigrated to the US in 1939, and used it to publish literature and distribute material relating to the topic for more than a decade. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine lists orgone as a type of "putative energy".[12] There is no empirical support for the concept of orgone in medicine or the physical sciences,[6][dead link] and research into the concept ceased with the end[when?] History[edit] Evaluation[edit] William S.

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Wilhelm Reich Wilhelm Reich (/raɪx/; German: [ʀaɪç], 24 March 1897 – 3 November 1957) was an Austrian psychoanalyst, a member of the second generation of psychoanalysts after Sigmund Freud, and one of the most radical figures in the history of psychiatry. He was the author of several influential books, most notably Character Analysis (1933) and The Mass Psychology of Fascism (1933).[2] His work on character contributed to the development of Anna Freud's The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence (1936), and his idea of muscular armour – the expression of the personality in the way the body moves – shaped innovations such as body psychotherapy, Fritz Perls's Gestalt therapy, Alexander Lowen's bioenergetic analysis, and Arthur Janov's primal therapy. His writing influenced generations of intellectuals: during the 1968 student uprisings in Paris and Berlin, students scrawled his name on walls and threw copies of The Mass Psychology of Fascism at the police.[3] Early life[edit] Childhood[edit]

The Enneagram is Astrology! by E. Alan Meece The Enneagram is a system of nine psychological types. The word enneagram is based on the Greek word for nine. Peter J. Carroll Peter James Carroll (born 8 January 1953, in Patching, England) is a modern occultist, author, cofounder of the Illuminates of Thanateros, and practitioner of chaos magic theory.[1] Early life[edit] Carroll studied science at University of London and graduated with a "precisely calculated minimum pass".[2] After university, Carroll was employed as a school teacher, and spent four years in India and the Himalayas.[2] Career[edit]

Septenary (Theosophy) The Septenary in Helena Blavatsky's teachings refers to the seven principles of man. In The Key to Theosophy[1] she presents a synthesis of Eastern (Advaita Vedanta, Samkhya) and Western (Platonism, 19th century Occultism) ideas, according to which human nature consists of seven principles. These are: Each of these principles are embodied as such: These seven principles can be grouped into a threefold division of Monad (transcendent Spirit, consisting of Atma and Buddhi), Ego (the higher immortal spiritual Personality, made up of the Higher Manas only) and Lower Quaternity (the mortal personality, the Lower Manas and the remaining principles). Theosophists believe that the most material of the vestures of the soul are interpenetrated by the particles of the more subtle vesture.

Martin Fleischmann Martin Fleischmann FRS (29 March 1927 – 3 August 2012) was a British chemist noted for his work in electrochemistry.[3][4] Premature announcement of his cold fusion research with Stanley Pons,[5] regarding excess heat in heavy water, led to their names being identified with the frenzy, controversy, and backlash that followed, although they continued their interest and research in cold fusion.[6][citation needed] Early life[edit] Born in Karlovy Vary, Czechoslovakia, in 1927.[6] Since his father was of Jewish heritage, Fleischmann's family moved to the Netherlands and then to England in 1938, to avoid Nazi persecution.[6] He received a PhD from Imperial College London in 1950.[6] Career[edit] 1950s – 1983[edit]

Which star system did YOU originate from? Last updated on July 6, 2011 at 12:00 am EDT by in5d Alternative News * Visit in5D Connection where you can find your soul mate or join one of our amazing groups. EVERYONE is welcome! Chaos magic The chaosphere is a popular symbol of chaos magic. Many variants exist. For more, see Symbol of Chaos. General principles[edit] Chaos magicians are often seen by other occultists as dangerous or worrisome revolutionaries.[2] Messiah (Derren Brown special) Messiah is a Derren Brown special originally shown on Channel 4 on 7 January 2005 at 21:00. In the episode, Brown travels to the United States to try to convince five influential figures that he has special abilities in their particular field of expertise: psychic powers, Christian evangelism, New Age theories, alien abduction and contacting the dead, with the objective of getting them to endorse him as a practitioner in their field. The concept of the show is to highlight the power of suggestion with regard to beliefs and people's abilities, and failure to question them. Brown makes it quite clear that if any of the subjects accused him of trickery he would immediately come clean about the whole thing, a rule similar to one of the self-imposed rules of the perpetrators of the Project Alpha hoax.

Clarke's three laws Clarke's Three Laws are three "laws" of prediction formulated by the British science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke. They are: