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Lisztomania - Wikipedia. Lisztomania or Liszt fever was the intense fan frenzy directed toward Hungarian composer Franz Liszt during his performances.

Lisztomania - Wikipedia

John McCain - Wikipedia. Early life and military career, 1936–1981 Formative years and education John McCain was born on August 29, 1936, at Coco Solo Naval Air Station in the Panama Canal Zone, to naval officer John S.

John McCain - Wikipedia

McCain Jr. (1911–1981) and Roberta (Wright) McCain (born 1912). He has a younger brother named Joe and an elder sister named Sandy.[1] At that time, the Panama Canal was under U.S. control.[2] Ludger Sylbaris - Wikipedia. A postcard featuring Cyparis labelled "survivor of Saint-Pierre".

Ludger Sylbaris - Wikipedia

Ludger Sylbaris (born circa 1875 – died circa 1929), born either August Cyparis or Louis-Auguste Cyparis, was an Afro-Caribbean man who travelled with the Barnum & Bailey circus. He had become something of an early 20th-century celebrity for being one of the only survivors in the town itself of the devastating volcanic eruption of Mt. Pelée on the French-Caribbean island of Martinique on May 8, 1902. This same eruption completely flattened an entire city, the "Paris of the West Indies", St. Urbain Grandier. Urbain Grandier (born in 1590 in Bouère, died in Mayenne – 18 August 1634 in Loudun) was a French Catholic priest who was burned at the stake after being convicted of witchcraft, following the events of the so-called "Loudun Possessions".

Urbain Grandier

The circumstances of Father Grandier's trial and execution have attracted the attention of writers Alexandre Dumas, père, Aldous Huxley and the playwright John Whiting, composers like Krzysztof Penderecki and Peter Maxwell Davies, as well as historian Jules Michelet and various scholars of European witchcraft. Most modern commentators have concluded that Grandier was the victim of a politically motivated persecution led by the powerful Cardinal Richelieu. Life[edit] Grandier served as priest in the church of Sainte Croix in Loudun, in the Diocese of Poitiers. Ignoring his vow of celibacy, he is known to have had sexual relationships with a number of women and to have acquired a reputation as a philanderer.

Louis Wain. Louis Wain at his drawing table[1] Louis Wain (5 August 1860 – 4 July 1939) was an English artist best known for his drawings, which consistently featured anthropomorphised large-eyed cats and kittens. In his later years he may have suffered from schizophrenia (although this claim is disputed), which, according to some psychiatrists, can be seen in his works. Life and work[edit] A naturalistic cat from early in Wain's career. Olga of Kiev. Saint Olga (Old Church Slavonic: Ольга, hypothetically Old Norse: Helga[1] born c. 890 died 11 July 969, Kiev) was a ruler of Kievan Rus' as regent (945–c. 963) for her son, Svyatoslav.

Olga of Kiev

Early life[edit] Olga was a Pskov woman of Varangian extraction who married the future Igor of Kiev, arguably in 903. The Primary Chronicle gives 879 as her date of birth, which is rather unlikely, given the fact that her only son was probably born some 65 years after that date. After Igor's death, she ruled Kievan Rus as regent (945-c. 963) for their son, Svyatoslav. Musa I of Mali. Ota Benga. Ota Benga (circa 1883[1] – March 20, 1916) was a Congolese man, an Mbuti pygmy known for being featured in an anthropology exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St.

Ota Benga

Louis, Missouri in 1904, and in a human zoo exhibit in 1906 at the Bronx Zoo. Benga had been purchased from African slave traders by the explorer Samuel Phillips Verner, a businessman hunting Africans for the Exposition.[2] He traveled with Verner to the United States. At the Bronx Zoo, Benga had free run of the grounds before and after he was exhibited in the zoo's Monkey House. Patrick Hughes (artist) Patrick Hughes.

Patrick Hughes (artist)

Leaning on a Landscape, 1979, print. He has been represented by Angela Flowers for more than forty years. His work entitled Paradoxymoron is currently exhibited in the British Library, London. Samy Kamkar. For the surname Kamkar, see Kamkar.

Samy Kamkar

Work[edit] Samy worm[edit] In 2006, Kamkar was raided by the United States Secret Service and Electronic Crimes Task Force, expanded from the Patriot Act, for releasing the worm.[6] Kamkar pled guilty to a felony charge of computer hacking in Los Angeles Superior Court, and was prohibited from using a computer for three years. Since 2008, Kamkar has been doing independent computer security and privacy research and consulting.[14] Green Boots. Photo of Green Boots taken by Everest climber.

Green Boots

Akinwale Arobieke. Akinwale Oluwafolajimi Oluwatope Arobieke[1] (born 15 July 1961),[1][2][3] known locally in North West England as Purple Aki due to his very dark skin almost resembling the colour purple,[1] is an English convicted criminal.

Akinwale Arobieke

Abraham Shakespeare. Abraham Lee Shakespeare (April 24, 1966[citation needed] — ca. April 7, 2009) was an American casual laborer who won a $30 million lottery jackpot, receiving $17 million in 2006. In 2009, his family declared him missing, and in January 2010 his body was found buried under a concrete slab in the backyard of an acquaintance. Dorris "Dee Dee" Moore was convicted of his murder and is now serving life in prison without the possibility of parole.[1] Shakespeare's troubles began after winning the lottery. Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca. Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca (Jerez de la Frontera, c. 1488/1490/1492[1] – Seville, c. 1557/1558/1559[1]/1560[2]) was a Spanish explorer of the New World, and one of four survivors of the 1527 Narváez expedition. During eight years of traveling across the US Southwest, he became a trader and faith healer to various Native American tribes before reconnecting with Spanish colonial forces in Mexico in 1536.

After returning to Spain in 1537, he wrote an account, first published in 1542 as La Relación ("The Relation", or in more modern terms "The Account"[3]), which in later editions was retitled Naufragios ("Shipwrecks"). Cabeza de Vaca has been considered notable as a proto-anthropologist for his detailed accounts of the many tribes of American Indians that he encountered. Early life and education[edit] Omayra Sánchez. Omayra Sánchez Garzón (August 28, 1972 – November 16, 1985) was a Colombian girl killed in Armero, department of Tolima, by the 1985 eruption of the Nevado del Ruiz volcano when she was 13 years old. Volcanic debris mixed with ice to form massive lahars (volcanically induced mudslides, landslides, and debris flows) that rushed into the river valleys below the mountain, killing nearly 23,000 people and destroying Armero and 13 other villages.

After a lahar demolished her home, Sánchez became pinned beneath the debris of her house, where she remained trapped in water for three days. Her plight was documented as she descended from calmness into agony. Her courage and dignity touched journalists and relief workers, who put great efforts into comforting her. After 60 hours of struggling, she died, likely as a result of either gangrene or hypothermia. Sánchez became internationally famous through a photograph of her taken by the photojournalist Frank Fournier shortly before she died. Sentinelese people. Audrey Munson. Raymond Robinson. Ötzi. Ötzi (German pronunciation: [ˈœtsi] ( ); also called Ötzi the Iceman, the Similaun Man, the Man from Hauslabjoch, Homo tyrolensis, and the Hauslabjoch mummy) is a well-preserved natural mummy of a man who lived around 3,300 BCE.[2][3] The mummy was found in September 1991 in the Ötztal Alps, hence Ötzi, near the Similaun mountain and Hauslabjoch on the border between Austria and Italy.[4] He is Europe's oldest known natural human mummy, and has offered an unprecedented view of Chalcolithic Europeans.

Gautama Buddha. Hatred does not cease by hatred, but only by love. This is the eternal rule. Gautama Buddha (c. 563 – c. 483 BC) was a teacher and religious leader. "Buddha", meaning "awakened one" or "enlightened one" is a title, not a name; the Shakyamuni Buddha, whose original name was Siddhartha Gautama, was the founder of Buddhism. Lucretia. Lucretia (/lʊˈkriːʃə/; died c. 510 BC (traditionally)) is a semi-legendary figure in the history of the Roman Republic. According to the story, told mainly by two turn-of-the-millennium historians, the Roman Livy and the Greek historian Dionysius of Halicarnassus (who lived in Rome at the time of the Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus), her rape by the Etruscan king's son and consequent suicide were the immediate cause of the revolution that overthrew the monarchy and established the Roman Republic.

Tarrare. Baron Percy's original paper on Tarrare's medical history, Mémoire sur la polyphagie (1805) James Barry. James Miranda Stuart Barry (c. 1789-1799 – 25 July 1865, born Margaret Ann Bulkley), was a military surgeon in the British Army. House of Saud. The House of Saud (Arabic: آل سعود‎ Āl Saʻūd) is the ruling royal family of Saudi Arabia. The family has thousands of members. Olivier Levasseur. Misao Fujimura. David Reimer. Roman Polanski. Amelia Dyer. Temple Grandin. Mary I of England. Genie.

Stuart Roosa.